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Upcoming new release of the 1965 Shea Stadium material sounds promising. LP version depicted.




The word is out that the underground (= bootleg) label HMC (His Master's Choice) is due to release a number of interesting new Beatles products in the near future and that it will all start with a Shea Stadium film in the same quality as the few clips Apple let us see in their Anthology DVDs. We are talking about two different products here:
  • A "HMC Gazette" with a DVD + CD
  • A 12" Vinyl LP + CD package with a colour poster
Rumoured is that the DVD contains the unreleased 2005 stereo remaster of the film commissioned by Apple. The audio contents are not known at the time of writing. HMC (formerly known as Yellow Dog) is primarily known for audio only bootlegs, but they recently released their first DVD (the Delaney & Bonnie concert from Copenhagen), so this new Shea will be their second DVD release. Further DVD releases of rare Beatles stuff is expected from the company in the next few months.

Due to the fact that "The Beatles At Shea Stadium" never has been released in an official capacity except for a few clips from the film used in documentaries, the film keeps being exploited by various bootleggers as well as being traded among fans. The undoctored soundtrack was leaked to the Beatlesfan community a few years ago and has been frequently used as a secondary soundtrack to bootleg DVDs of the film.

Below is a clip of "Dizzy Miss Lizzy" was used to promote a collection of Capitol Albums in 2007.
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1 comment: Links to this post

Source: http://wogew.blogspot.com/2014/04/upcoming-new-underground-shea-releases.html

Bonus Clip: Beatles "Can't Buy Me Love" from Shea Stadium
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We thought we’d start the new year with something very special. Just before Christmas, Apple Corps/Universal Music invited SuperDeluxeEdition in to take an exclusive look at the forthcoming Beatles box set, The U.S. Albums.

As previously announced on this blog, this special collection is released on 20 January 2014 and contains 13 CDs; titles released by Capitol Records in the 1960s that, for the most part, were quite different from their UK counterparts (new titles, alternate track listing, occasional mix differences).

The U.S. Albums box (the individual titles are also being released separately) celebrates 50 years since The Beatles’ started the so-called ‘British Invasion’, when I Want To Hold Your Hand hit number one in AmericaHalf a century hasn’t diminished the scale of that achievement. I Want To Hold Your Hand spent seven weeks and the top of the US charts and went on to sell an incredible five million copies. It only relinquished the top-spot to She Loves You (which had by that point already spent five weeks waiting patiently at number two!) and during this time The Beatles made their historic appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. Beatlemania was in full swing and in April 1964 the band held the top five positions in Billboard’s Hot 100.


WORLD EXCLUSIVE: First Pictures / The Beatles U.S. Albums box set

front
 We thought we’d start the new year with something very special. Just before Christmas, Apple Corps/Universal Music invited SuperDeluxeEdition in to take an exclusive look at the forthcoming Beatles box set, The U.S. Albums.
As previously announced on this blog, this special collection is released on 20 January 2014 and contains 13 CDs; titles released by Capitol Records in the 1960s that, for the most part, were quite different from their UK counterparts (new titles, alternate track listing, occasional mix differences).

The U.S. Albums box (the individual titles are also being released separately) celebrates 50 years since The Beatles’ started the so-called ‘British Invasion’, when I Want To Hold Your Hand hit number one in AmericaHalf a century hasn’t diminished the scale of that achievement. I Want To Hold Your Hand spent seven weeks and the top of the US charts and went on to sell an incredible five million copies. It only relinquished the top-spot to She Loves You (which had by that point already spent five weeks waiting patiently at number two!) and during this time The Beatles made their historic appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. Beatlemania was in full swing and in April 1964 the band held the top five positions in Billboard’s Hot 100.
open


13 CDs replicate the original Capitol releases
The U.S. Albums box set is very similar in style to The Beatles in Mono box that was issued in 2009. It eschews the stark black and white of previous box designs and boasts a glossy and colourful presentation set largely in blue, with a great photo of John, Paul, George and Ringo positioned in front of the Stars & Stripes (the image is used on both sides of the set). Like the Mono Box an inner ‘drawer’ (complete with Apple Corps logo) slides out containing the 13 CDs in Japanese-style clear resealable plastic sleeves. The box is a high quality affair and is very sturdy.


The individual albums are reproduced in vinyl replica mini-LP CD style, on VERY thick card. These include two gatefolds (The Beatles’ Story and Help!) and Yesterday And Today is reproduced with the infamous ‘butcher’ cover. This comes with a separate sticker which features the replacement ‘trunk’ cover. Replica inner sleeves with period adverts are accurate (“Join the teen set on Capitol“, “Capitol ’66; Sounds Great!“) and the CDs within these paper inner sleeves have a further protection from thin Japanese-style plastic inner wallets.


Starting tomorrow with Meet The Beatles!, we will bring you further photos of the individual albums over the next two weeks.
In the meantime, we’d like to wish you all a very happy twenty fab four-teen and hope you enjoy the many photos of this box set, below. We will answer any questions we can on this set – just leave a comment.

Source: http://www.superdeluxeedition.com/picture-gallery/world-exclusive-first-pictures-the-beatles-u-s-albums-box-set/

1964: Meet The Beatles

The Superdeluxeedition blog kicks off the new year by publishing quite a few real photos of the new US Beatles CD boxed set. Individual shots of each album is to follow the next days. Take a look at the box here.


1964: Second Album

1964: A Hard Day's Night (first time on CD)

1964: Something New

1964: The Beatles' Story (first time on CD)

1964: Beatles '65

1964: The Early Beatles

1965: Beatles VI

1965: Help!

1965: Rubber Soul

1966: Yesterday And Today (first time on CD)
1966: Yesterday and Today (alternate cover sticker)

1966: Revolver (first time on CD)

1970: Hey Jude (aka The Beatles Again) (first time on CD)


The Second Disc

Expanded and Remastered Music News

Review: The Beatles, “The U.S. Albums”

The Beatles - U.S. Albums Box


I. Meet the Beatles!
Did The Beatles save rock and roll?
If John, Paul, George and Ringo didn’t save the still-young form, they certainly gifted it with a reinvigorating, exhilarating jolt of musical euphoria the likes of which hadn’t been seen before – and hasn’t been duplicated since.  The scene was early 1964.  Buddy Holly was long gone, and the big hits had dried up – at the moment, at least – for Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard.  Elvis had served his time in the Army, threatening to turn the rebellious rogue into a symbol of The Establishment.  Of course, all was far from lost.  The rise of the Brill Building led to some of the most well-crafted, immaculately-produced records of all time, though many of those were as indebted to classic Tin Pan Alley songwriting as to the youthful spirit of rock and roll.


Enter The Beatles.  By the end of the tumultuous year, the group had charted 28 records in the U.S. Hot 100 (11 in the Top 10) and released five – count ‘em, five – albums on Capitol plus one soundtrack on United Artists.  Capitol had a lot of catching up to do to sate seemingly insatiable demand for the music of the Liverpudlian quartet.  Those heady early days in which The Beatles began the charge that would transform “rock and roll” into “rock” are chronicled on the splendid new 13-CD box set The U.S. Albums.  It presents the unique albums released stateside between 1964 and 1966, plus one from 1970, including five which have never before appeared on CD (well, legally, anyway) anywhere in the world.  [Every album in the box is also available for individual sale save The Beatles’ Story which is exclusive to the box.]

From the time The Beatles broke into the British Top 20 in late 1962 with “Love Me Do,” there was no turning back.  By the end of 1963, the hard-working band had scored five singles in the U.K. Top 20, three of which went to No. 1.  Debut long-player Please Please Me was No. 1 on the U.K. Albums Chart for 30 weeks, only finally displaced with the arrival of sophomore LP With the Beatles.  The stage was set for world domination, and the key to that international success was America.  But could The Beatles repeat that level of success on American shores?

Dave Dexter Jr., head of Capitol’s international A&R, had been rejecting Beatles singles since late 1962 and “Love Me Do.”  Dexter’s recalcitrance led to EMI entering into early licensing agreements with labels like Swan and Vee-Jay (Remember The Beatles vs. The Four Seasons?  Or Introducing…The Beatles?  Altogether unsurprisingly, they’re not included in this box set!).  But the executive could only ignore the future Fabs for so long.  “She Loves You,” rejected by Dexter for U.S. release, had become the first British record to sell one million copies prior to its release; With the Beatles sold 500,000 copies within a week of its release date.  Capitol had no choice but to pay attention to these numbers, especially given the small size of the U.K. compared to the U.S. market.  When Capitol finally acquiesced and signed the lads, Dexter was the one in charge of packaging the band’s music for American audiences.

Meet the Beatles, his first newly-created U.S. album, was based on With the Beatles, the group’s second British LP.  It arrived in stores on January 20, 1964, just weeks before the band debuted on the February 9 broadcast of The Ed Sullivan Show.  73 million viewers tuned in, a higher number than had watched any program in television history.  The reviews weren’t all glowing; in fact, many were far from it.  But Beatlemania couldn’t be stopped.  The ensuing frenzy was, perhaps, a manifestation of the power of the nascent youth culture, but soon the Fab Four dominated culture, period.

The American media was poised to rebel against this revolution, looking upon The Beatles’ seemingly inevitable success with curiosity and distrust.  But America, still smarting from the tragic assassination of President John F. Kennedy in November 1963, was poised to accept these bright young men with all of their enormous promise, goofy humor, and messages of love and hope in their music.  What wasn’t immediately evident except perhaps to the most perceptive listeners was the mélange of influences that informed The Beatles’ revolutionary sound – showtunes, music hall ballads, rockabilly, country-and-western, Brill Building pop, and rhythm and blues, to name a few.  It didn’t hurt that the lads’ looks were as revolutionary as their music.  They were, of course, “the whole package.”    The Beatles were frequently queried about how long such success could possibly last.  Even the most confident of them likely couldn’t have imagined the fact that, 50 years later, their music would remain just as beloved – perhaps even more – as during those heady days of 1964.

Meet the Beatles! didn’t disappoint…far from it.  Dexter’s LP remained at No. 1 on the Billboard chart for eleven weeks, ceding only to The Beatles’ Second Album.  When the United Artists soundtrack album to A Hard Day’s Night arrived, it spent 14 weeks at No. 1, the longest run of any album in 1964.  Capitol’s Something New could have been considered a disappointment as it peaked at No. 2, but it was held from the top position by…A Hard Day’s NightBeatles ’65 spent nine weeks at No. 1 and was crowned the best-selling LP of 1965.  The Beatles were no flash in the pan.
After the jump: what exactly will you find in The U.S. Albums?



Hard Day's Night OST

II.            Yesterday and Today
The discs contained in The U.S. Albums are the records that ushered in the British Invasion, yet their importance wasn’t always recognized.  When The Beatles’ recordings came to CD for the first time in 1987, the U.S. releases were almost completely ignored, as Apple Corps favored an approach to standardize the catalogue with the U.K. albums – which, it’s paramount to note, were the only versions completely created and sanctioned by the band and their producer, George Martin.  One U.S. release did “make the cut” – Capitol’s Magical Mystery Tour, which explains its absence from The U.S. Albums.  Martin also remixed two albums, Help! and Rubber Soul, to provide more natural stereo soundscapes.
Capitol’s American creations were, after all, cobbled together from various U.K. releases, and even when albums bore the same titles as their British counterparts, the material was still often quite different.  For one thing, the U.S. albums were limited to twelve tracks, whereas their British counterparts boasted fourteen.  Capitol also desired to place on albums the non-LP singles recorded by The Beatles overseas.  The British A Hard Day’s Night and Help! LPs were all-Beatles, all-the-time.  Their American counterparts subbed out numerous cuts for instrumental, orchestral tracks.  It wasn’t until 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band that The Beatles finally were able to demand that their original albums – created and sequenced by the band and their producer in the U.K. – be released worldwide, untouched.


The differences between the U.S. and U.K. releases extended beyond repertoire.  Dexter had frequently altered Martin’s original mixes, adding reverb to several tracks and simulating stereo via Capitol’s “Duophonic” process on other tracks.   Apple delivered on the promise of CD releases for the familiar U.S. titles in 2004 with The Capitol Albums Vol. 1, containing Meet the Beatles!, The Beatles’ Second Album, Something New and Beatles ’65 on CD for the first time. A second volume followed in 2006 with The Early Beatles, Beatles VI, and the U.S. versions of Help! and Rubber Soul.  Both of these box sets retained all of Capitol’s mixes, including the “fake stereo” duophonic tracks.

Clearly, Apple felt the 50th anniversary of the Fabs’ American arrival warranted an upgrade for these beloved albums.  In addition to re-presenting those already reissued via The Capitol Albums Vols. 1 and 2, the new set premieres the five albums never before on CD – the United Artists soundtrack of A Hard Day’s Night (1964), the audio documentary The Beatles’ Story (1964), Yesterday and Today (1966), the U.S. Revolver (1966) and Hey Jude (1970).  Every album in the box includes both mono and stereo mixes save the stereo-only Beatles Story and Hey Jude.  Make no mistake: this set is every bit as lavish as its historically-significant (and still exciting and vibrant) music deserves.

However, the set is not without controversy.  The decision was made by Apple not to replicate the original U.S. albums’ often-dodgy mixes, but rather to use their track listings as a jumping-on point to recreate the albums anew for 2014.  The band’s preferred mixes – as remastered for the core catalogue in 2009 – provide the basis for The U.S. Albums.  For the most part, that is.  (More on that later.)   All of the “duophonic”/fake stereo mixes are absent here, replaced with true stereo versions.  The tracks subjected to additional reverb by Capitol have been largely stripped of it.  The mono tracks which were “folded down” from stereo have been replaced with true mono versions.  George Martin’s 1987 mixes of Help! and Rubber Soul have been utilized, as well, rather than the originals.  Now, here’s the “most part” part.  The 2009 remasters have undergone further audio tweaking and subtle volume adjustments. 

 Producers have also chosen to preserve certain unique U.S. mixes and edits in both the mono and stereo portions of the albums while others have been overlooked.  (For those who are interested, the Usenet Guide to Beatles Recording Variations is one particularly valuable resource in determining what’s what, and a page of a lengthy thread here might also prove helpful.)  The box’s notes indicate that “the original U.S. albums were used as models and set the overall direction for the process” of assembling this set.


Beatles - Hey Jude

III.           What Goes On
Your level of devotion to authenticity will likely determine your mileage concerning this set which has been assembled and remastered, in part, by Greg Calbi of Sterling Sound.  (Remastering for the set is credited to Paul Hicks, Sean Magee, Guy Massey, Sam Okell, Steve Rooke and Greg Calbi, under the supervision of Steve Berkowitz.)  The U.S. Albums raises a question that periodically occurs when considering reissues and catalogue titles: Is it more important that a reissue reflect an original recording, however flawed, or strive for the best possible sound and quality?  Frank Zappa famously re-recorded parts of his released albums when revisiting them for compact disc.  Bruce Springsteen and The Rolling Stones are among the artists who have prepared previously unreleased material for CD by re-recording vocal and instrumental parts decades later.  The last round of American reissues of Frank Sinatra’s Reprise catalogue extensively remixed the original recordings.  In the case of The Beatles, few would argue – though a cursory look around the Internet will easily turn up those few – that true stereo sounds better than “fake” duophonic, or that true mono beats “fold downs.”  Likewise, most would agree with George Martin that The Beatles’ Abbey Road-made recordings didn’t need any additional reverb (reportedly added to achieve a more “American” studio sound).  Should Capitol and Apple have replaced those mixes here, given that they were the mixes with which these tracks were introduced to the American public?  Each person reading this might well have a different answer, but if you’re looking for the best sounding versions of these songs and not necessarily the versions you heard in the sixties, you will, indeed, find them here.
If that’s not enough, keep in mind that the two volumes of The Capitol Albums already have preserved the original U.S. versions of all but five of this box set’s albums on CD.  Of those five making their CD debuts here:
  • The mono Hard Day’s Night soundtrack is accurate to the original U.S. pressing; the album was never released in true stereo, so the true stereo version here is a welcome extra.
  • The Beatles’ Story, an audio documentary written by John Babcock and produced by Gary Usher and Roger Christian of Beach Boys fame, has been derived from its original Capitol stereo masters.
  • The U.S. Revolver and Hey Jude (the former in both mono and stereo, the latter stereo-only) are also said to be wholly accurate to the Capitol and Apple LPs, respectively.
  • That leaves Yesterday and Today as the box set’s one title that still hasn’t appeared on CD in its original form (and likely never will).  The U.S. Albums version preserves unique U.S. mixes of “I’m Only Sleeping,” “Doctor Robert” and “And Your Bird Can Sing” in mono, and “We Can Work It Out” and “Day Tripper” in stereo.  The other eight stereo tracks have been replaced with U.K. versions (many with the 1987 remixes); the U.S. mono tracks were largely identical to the U.K. tracks to begin with, and so only “Drive My Car” and “If I Needed Someone” have been replaced with U.K. mono versions.
In short, other than Yesterday and Today, all of The Beatles’ original U.S. album configurations can now be acquired on CD.
Beatles - Yesterday and Today

IV.          Think for Yourself
The U.S. Albums has been designed by Meire Murakami and Mike Diehl as a companion piece to the 2009 release The Beatles in Mono.  The striking slipcase box is the same size, and like that set, contains each album in deluxe Japanese-style oversized mini-LP jackets.  Each jacket is individually sealed in plastic, and besides the painstakingly recreated artwork, contains replicas of the original inserts and the CD itself in an inner sleeve.  Like the album art, the original labels from Capitol, Apple and United Artists have also all been recreated.  (The individually-released CDs also have OBI strips; these are not included with the box set’s CDs.)  Original gatefold covers have also been retained.  Only the most jaded Beatlefan won’t experience at least a small thrill finally picking up A Hard Day’s Night on CD and discovering the period United Artists logo or the inner sleeve advertising albums from George Jones, Duke Ellington and Ferrante and Teicher plus the soundtracks to From Russia with Love and Never on Sunday!  Even more exciting is the presentation of Yesterday and Today.  At first glance you’ll notice the final “trunk” cover, but once you open the album, you’ll find that the trunk cover is a sticker, and the actual CD boasts the infamous “butcher” cover!   The Capitol Albums boxes were sharply criticized for their oddly shoddy packaging; no such complaints could be leveled against this beautiful, sturdy package. A new “The Beatles 50” logo adorns the box alongside the Apple, Capitol and UMe labels, as well, signaling that future projects may be in the works for 2014.


A squarebound paperback 64-page booklet is included, which is lavishly illustrated with photographs, memorabilia and single sleeve images and original album advertisements.  A page dedicated to each album preserves credits and chart positions, but individual notes aren’t made as to the origins of each track.  The centerpiece of the booklet is Bill Flanagan’s thoughtful and comprehensive essay which places these albums in context and also delves into the variations between the U.S. and U.K. LPs.  Some wags might note the irony of an essay beginning with “How would you feel if someone told you your memories were WRONG?  The way you remember it didn’t happen – or if it did happen, it was a mistake.  You’d be bothered, you’d be annoyed, you’d resent whoever was devaluing your experience.”  Flanagan is, of course, referring to some American fans’ reactions when the Beatles catalogue was standardized in 1987 to the U.K. albums only.  Some readers might feel “bothered, annoyed” and resentful at the liberties taken by The U.S. Albums to its source material.  A second note in the booklet defends the decision as “an effort to preserve the original intentions of the band and the producers”: “While doing so [remastering from the Capitol master tapes] would have been the easiest way to go, it would not have created the best possible listening experience.”  The U.S. Albums is, then, the best of both worlds – the track listings American fans remember from fifty years ago with the sound quality demanded by present-day listeners.  On those counts, it succeeds mightily.


The U.S. Albums is an engrossing and sonically superior presentation worthy of the monumental, significant, and yes, fun music within its slipcase.  It traces the evolution of The Beatles’ liberating sound from Motown and Chuck Berry covers and effervescent originals like “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and “She Loves You” through the creation of their own “new standards” such as “In My Life” and “Yesterday.”  This is music that doesn’t grow old, music that knows no barriers.  Some might prefer the “pure” remasters on The Capitol Albums Vols. 1 and 2.  Those who do should hold onto those volumes and pick up the new Hard Day’s Night, Revolver and Hey Jude titles to all but complete your set.  The U.S. Albums is a new, thrilling, alternative look at the essential records that ignited cultural change and brought generations apart, then together.   You say you want a revolution?  Look no further.


You can order The U.S. Albums at Amazon U.S. and Amazon U.K.  !

Source: http://theseconddisc.com/2014/01/28/review-the-beatles-the-u-s-albums/


As a special treat for Christmas, I've posted the Beatles Christmas Messages recordings. 
Below are details on each of the recordings and their audio to enjoy. These bring back fond memories.



Each year from 1963 through 1969, the Beatles recorded a special Christmas greeting for their fans. The Official Beatles Fan Club in England sent flexi-discs containing the Christmas messages to its members each holiday season.The American fan club, Beatles (U.S.A.) Ltd., was established in 1964, and for their first Christmas, the American fan club sent fans the 1963 Christmas message on a soundcard, which is like a flexi-disc, but is "printed" on the post card that is mailed. No message was sent to the American fans in 1965 because the tape was not received on time.[Read more →] The Beatles Christmas flexis are very rare, and sell, in excellent condition, anywhere from $200 to $500.


These recordings offer a unique time-capsule glimpse into the personalities and evolution of the Beatles from 1963 through 1969. In the early years, like their appearances in A Hard Day’s Night, even though these messages were scripted by “somebody’s bad hand-wroter” (their Press Agent Tony Barrow), the Beatle’s geniune wit and humor shines through, for example, in 1963, when as John mentions taking part in the Royal Variety show, the boys extemporaneously launch into a whistling version of God Save The Queen, or in 1964, when Paul mentions that they don’t really know where they’d be without the fans, John says, off-handedly, “In the Army, perhaps…”


For older Beatles fans who remember hearing these messages over the years, “these little bits of plastic” are a fond holiday tradition, while for younger Beatles fans they offer a whole new insight into a pop music phenomenon which might never be repeated.


We present the Beatles Christmas Records here as a Christmas present to you from the Internet Beatles Album. Happy Crimble!

1963-uk-cover.jpg 


1963
The Beatles Christmas Record
Released December 6, 1963
Recorded October 17, 1963
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Engineer: Norman Smith
Recorded after a session for I Want To Hold Your Hand and This Boy.
About 30,000 total copies were manufactured.
This recording was sent to US Fan Club members in 1964.









1964
Another Beatles Christmas Record
Released December 18, 1964
Recorded October 26, 1964
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Engineer: Norman Smith
The only Beatles Fan Club Christmas record that played at 45 RPM instead of 33 1/3 RPM.
Recorded on the same day that they recorded Honey Don’t for Beatles For Sale.
US Fan Club members received the 1963 Christmas message this year.








1965
The Beatles Third Christmas Record
Released December 17, 1965
Recorded November 8, 1965
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Engineer: Norman Smith
Recorded during the Rubber Soul sessions, on the same day they recorded Think For Yourself. Cover photo taken on November 1 during the taping of Granada-TV’s ‘The Music of Lennon and McCartney’.









1966
Pantomime (Everywhere It’s Christmas)
Released December 16, 1966
Recorded November 25, 1966
Recorded in the basement studio of Dick James Music in London
Mixed at Abbey Road, December 2, 1966. Produced by George Martin.
Cover designed by Paul.




Some of the historical info on this page is from the books The Beatles: A Day In The Life by Tom Schultheiss, The Beatles Day By Day by Mark Lewisohn and The Price Guide for the Beatles American Records by Perry Cox and Frank Daniels As the 60’s evolve, so do the Beatles, and so do their Christmas records.


The previous year, the Christmas message changed from scripted messages talking directly to the fans, to sketch comedy, mostly Paul’s idea, but enthusiastically joined in by the other three. 1967 brings a similar production, but as the members of the group start desiring to go their separate ways, this is also reflected in the Christmas records, as the final two years bring messages recorded in bits and pieces recorded separately by each Beatle and assembled together later.







1967
Christmas Time (Is Here Again)
Released December 15, 1967
Recorded November 28, 1967
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Produced by George Martin
Special guest: Victor Spinetti

The script was written earlier in the day by the band. Last Christmas record the Beatles recorded together as a group. Cover designed on November 29 by John and Ringo.

The song Christmas Time (Is Here Again) was later released on the Real Love single in 1995.







1968
Happy Christmas
Released December 20, 1968
Recorded in November, 1968 at John’s home in London, Paul’s home in London, in the back of Ringo’s van in Surrey, with George in America and at George’s house in Esher during rehearsals for the White Album.
Special guest: Tiny Tim.

Created by Radio 1 disc jockey Kenny Everett who edited together separately-recorded messages from John, Paul, George and Ringo, and inter-cut random fragments from the White Album.









1969
Happy Christmas 1969
Released December 19, 1969
Recorded in fall of 1969 at John and Yoko’s home in Ascot, Ringo’s home in Weybridge, Paul’s home in London, and the London offices of Apple.
Edited by Maurice Cole (Kenny Everett’s original name)
Cover designed by Ringo








Because the Beatles officially broke up in 1970, no Christmas message was prepared for that holiday season.



In early 1971, fan club members were sent an album on the Apple label containing all seven of the Christmas messages.
Pictured is the American version of the LP. The British LP entitled From Then To You included a reproduction of the cover of the 1963 Christmas record.



Along with Let It Be and Introducing The Beatles, this is one of the notoriously most heavily counterfeited of Beatles albums. Counterfeits can be identified by blurry cover photos and an indentation ring much larger than 1 1/2″.



Some of the historical info on this page is from the books The Beatles: A Day In The Life by Tom Schultheiss, The Beatles Day By Day by Mark Lewisohn and The Price Guide for the Beatles American Records by Perry Cox and Frank Daniels.


Thank you, Ringo. http://www.beatlesagain.com/




Source : http://www.ringofstars.ru/across/?p=2767





Below is my previous post of scans of the covers:
http://jfnmusicmemories.blogspot.com/2009/07/christmas-messages-covers.html

You can get the recordings here:

http://teenagedogsintrouble.blogspot.com/2009/12/very-merry-beatles-christmas.html










The 2-CD set features 63 tracks, with 40 new performances, not heard on the first Live At The BBC collection. It will be released on November 11th, and is available on Amazon now here:



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F3VOL38/ref=s9_simh_gw_p15_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=18A9KDEM009B7CF67AN7&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470939291&pf_rd_i=507846

From The Beatles.com

London – September 12, 2013 - In 1994, The Beatles’ Live at the BBC was released to worldwide acclaim - hitting number one in the U.K., number three in the U.S. and selling more than five million copies within six weeks. A new companion to The Beatles’ first BBC collection, On Air – Live at the BBC Volume 2, will be released Monday, November 11 in 2CD and 180-gram vinyl packages with a 48-page booklet. On Air’s 63 tracks, none of which overlaps with The Beatles’ first BBC release, include 37 previously unreleased performances and 23 previously unreleased recordings of in-studio banter and conversation between the band’s members and their BBC radio hosts.


In the studios of the British Broadcasting Corporation, The Beatles performed music for a variety of radio shows. On Air - Live at the BBC Volume 2 presents the sound of The Beatles seizing their moment to play for the nation. Thrilled to hear these exciting recordings again, Paul McCartney said, “There’s a lot of energy and spirit. We are going for it, not holding back at all, trying to put in the best performance of our lifetimes.”


Ten of On Air’s songs were never recorded by the group for EMI in the 1960s, including two making their debuts with the new release: The Beatles’ direct-to-air performance of Chuck Berry’s “I’m Talking About You” and a rocking cover of the standard “Beautiful Dreamer.” On Air also includes different versions of six rarities heard on the 1994 BBC collection: Little Richard’s “Lucille,” Chuck Berry’s “Memphis, Tennessee,” Chan Romero’s “The Hippy Hippy Shake,” Ray Charles’ “I Got A Woman,” and two songs they learned from records by Carl Perkins, “Glad All Over” and “Sure To Fall.”


The Beatles’ tribute to the BBC’s most important pop show of the early ’60s – “Happy Birthday, Dear Saturday Club” – is another surprise. As John Lennon recalled in 1980, “We did a lot of tracks that were never on record for Saturday Club – they were well recorded, too.” Paul remembers, “We’d been raised on the BBC radio programs. One of the big things in our week was Saturday Club – this great show was playing the kind of music we loved, so that was something we really aspired to.”


Between March 1962 and June 1965, no fewer than 275 unique musical performances by The Beatles were broadcast by the BBC in the U.K. The group played songs on 39 radio shows in 1963 alone. Ringo Starr said in 1994, “You tend to forget that we were a working band. It’s that mono sound. There were usually no overdubs. We were in at the count-in and that was it. I get excited listening to them.” On their busiest BBC day, July 16, 1963, The Beatles recorded 18 songs for three editions of their Pop Go The Beatles series in fewer than seven hours.


The group played 88 distinct songs in their BBC sessions – some were recorded many times; others performed just once. At the time, three national BBC stations provided all daytime radio broadcasting in the U.K. Only the Light Programme network might occasionally play a record. Most broadcast music was live music. Consequently, to promote their releases, The Beatles had to play live at the BBC. “Everything was done instantly,” remembered George Harrison, “But before that, we used to drive 200 miles in an old van down the M1, come into London, try and find the BBC and then set up and do the program. Then we’d probably drive back to Newcastle for a gig in the evening!”


On Air also features BBC recordings of 30 well-loved songs from The Beatles’ catalogue, including five number on¬es and other favorites such as: “I Saw Her Standing There,” “Twist And Shout,” “Do You Want To Know A Secret,” “Boys,” “Please Mister Postman,” “Money,” “And I Love Her,” and “If I Fell.”


Like its critically acclaimed predecessor, On Air - Live at the BBC Volume 2 includes audio of The Beatles talking to DJs Brian Matthew and Alan Freeman and Pop Go The Beatles hosts Lee Peters and Rodney Burke. When first broadcast, pop fans were amazed to hear such witty irreverence on the rather formal BBC and it is great fun to hear these extracts now. In addition, On Air releases, for the first time, the group’s candid interviews for the Pop Profile series recorded in November 1965 and May 1966.


Newly remastered for reissue on November 11, The Beatles’ first Live at the BBC album sounds and looks better than ever. This collection of the group’s BBC sessions mixed versions of their hits with a treasure trove of 30 songs The Beatles performed on air but never released on record in the 1960s. The compelling track list ranged from a rare performance of the little known Lennon-McCartney original “I’ll Be On My Way” to covers of classic rock ’n’ roll and contemporary rhythm and blues songs. At the time of its release, Live at the BBC was hailed by Rolling Stone as “an exhilarating portrait of a band in the process of shaping its own voice and vision.” It earned a GRAMMY® Award nomination for Best Historical Album.


Live at the BBC was assembled by George Martin in 1994 and On Air - Live at the BBC Volume Two was compiled and researched by producers Kevin Howlett and Mike Heatley. Both albums have been meticulously mastered by engineers Guy Massey and Alex Wharton at Abbey Road Studios. The booklets for both collections include Kevin Howlett’s essays on the history of The Beatles’ BBC radio sessions and his detailed commentaries on all of the tracks.


www.thebeatles.com
The Beatles: On Air – Live at the BBC Volume 2

CD ONE

1. And Here We Are Again (Speech)
2. WORDS OF LOVE
3. How About It, Gorgeous? (Speech)
4. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET
5. LUCILLE
6. Hey, Paul… (Speech)
7. ANNA (GO TO HIM)
8. Hello! (Speech)
9. PLEASE PLEASE ME
10. MISERY
11. I’M TALKING ABOUT YOU
12. A Real Treat (Speech)
13. BOYS
14. Absolutely Fab (Speech)
15. CHAINS
16. ASK ME WHY
17. TILL THERE WAS YOU
18. LEND ME YOUR COMB
19. Lower 5E (Speech)
20. THE HIPPY HIPPY SHAKE
21. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN
22. THERE’S A PLACE
23. Bumper Bundle (Speech)
24. P.S. I LOVE YOU
25. PLEASE MISTER POSTMAN
26. BEAUTIFUL DREAMER
27. DEVIL IN HER HEART
28. The 49 Weeks (Speech)
29. SURE TO FALL (IN LOVE WITH YOU)
30. Never Mind, Eh? (Speech)
31. TWIST AND SHOUT
32. Bye, Bye (speech)
33. John - Pop Profile (Speech)
34. George - Pop Profile (Speech)

CD TWO

1. I SAW HER STANDING THERE
2. GLAD ALL OVER
3. Lift Lid Again (Speech)
4. I’LL GET YOU
5. SHE LOVES YOU
6. MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
7. HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEAR SATURDAY CLUB
8. Now Hush, Hush (Speech)
9. FROM ME TO YOU
10. MONEY (THAT’S WHAT I WANT)
11. I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
12. Brian Bathtubes (Speech)
13. THIS BOY
14. If I Wasn’t In America (Speech)
15. I GOT A WOMAN
16. LONG TALL SALLY
17. IF I FELL
18. A Hard Job Writing Them (Speech)
19. AND I LOVE HER
20. Oh, Can’t We? Yes We Can (Speech)
21. YOU CAN’T DO THAT
22. HONEY DON’T
23. I’LL FOLLOW THE SUN
24. Green With Black Shutters (Speech)
25. KANSAS CITY/HEY-HEY-HEY-HEY!
26. That’s What We’re Here For (Speech)
27. I FEEL FINE (STUDIO OUTTAKE)
28. Paul - Pop Profile (Speech)
29. Ringo - Pop Profile (Speech)



Update: Now scheduled for November 2013.

In November 1994 Apple Records made a celebrated triumphant return after not having a release since Ringo Starr’s hits compilation LP Blast From Your Past 19 years earlier. The comeback was initiated with Live At The BBC – a 2-CD collection of Beatles BBC radio performances recorded between 1963 and 1965. Since then they’ve brought us everything from The Beatles Anthologies, Yellow Submarine Songtrack, the One collection, a “naked version of the Let It Be LP, the Love mashups, an entire remastering of the complete Beatles catalog on CD and vinyl and even restored versions of most of The Beatles films. Now that Apple has gone full circle, it is releasing a second collection of BBC radio recordings by The Beatles called Live At The BBC Volume 2 that promises to be every bit as entertaining as the first.

Although the first Live At The BBC didn’t use any of the earliest Beatles BBC recordings from 1962, they actually go all the way back to March of that year. With nearly 270 recordings made between then and May of 1965, this adds up to around 9 and a half hours of music in all. Only 56 of these tracks appeared on Apple’s first BBC collection (click here for a track listing). In addition to that set only four other tracks have been released officially. They are “Lend Me Your Comb” on The Beatles Anthology 1 CD set and three B-sides to a 1995 CD single of “Baby It’s You” – “Boys,” “Devil In Her Heart” and “I’ll Follow The Sun” (I’m not counting “Baby It’s You” itself since it also appeared on Live At The BBC). Other BBC recordings by The Beatles have only been available in the bootleg market.
As with Apples’ first BBC collection, this set will include a few bits of humorous chat sessions between The Beatles and the likes of the BBC radio personalities of the day such as Brian Matthew and Alan Freeman. The new set was reported earlier to be planned for release during the first week of October 2013 but the latest is that it will be out in November. Stay tuned!


Source: http://www.thebeatlesrarity.com/2013/08/22/the-beatles-live-at-the-bbc-volume-2-coming-in-october-2013/

 In a separate article:

Hard as it might be to believe, apparently there are still enough unreleased Beatles recordings to fill yet another compilation.

Multiple sources are reporting that Apple has set Oct. 3 as the release date for ‘Live at the BBC, Vol. 2,’ which arrives nearly 20 years after ‘Vol. 1.’ And like its predecessor, it compiles live performances that the Fab Four delivered within the walls of the U.K. radio giant’s studios.

The first volume, released in 1994, filled two CDs with 69 songs from appearances the band made between 1962-65. It’s unknown at this time how many tracks or discs ‘Vol. 2′ will boast, but it will focus on performances previously thought to be lost due to the BBC’s policy of erasing and reusing tapes after shows.

Between listeners who recorded the shows at home and syndicated stations that aired the broadcasts in other markets, Apple has apparently compiled enough rarities to round out a new album. The new volume may include some of the bonus tracks issued as B-sides on the ‘Baby It’s You’ single from ‘Vol. 1′ (‘I’ll Follow The Sun,’ ‘Devil In Her Heart’ and ‘Boys’)

‘Live at the BBC, Vol. 2′ will be released alongside a new book, titled ‘The Beatles: The BBC Archives: 1962-1970,’ written by Kevin Howlett, author of ‘The Beatles at the Beeb 1962-1965′ and ‘The Beatles at the BBC.’ It’s set to arrive in stores on Oct. 10.

Source: http://ultimateclassicrock.com/beatles-live-at-the-bbc-vol-2/


When Capitol Records released “The Beatles Live at the BBC” to great fanfare in 1994, Beatles collectors lamented that the two-disc set barely scratched the surface of the vast trove of recordings the band made for the BBC between March 1962 and June 1965. Many of those radio recordings were already on a 10-disc bootleg set, after all, and in the 19 years since then, bootleggers have come up with another three discs’ worth of material.

But Capitol and Apple, the Beatles’ own label, are determined to catch up. “On Air – Live at the BBC Volume 2,” another two discs, will be released Nov. 11. It will include 63 tracks, including 40 songs and 23 spoken segments, with interviews, introductions and studio banter. A remastered version of the 1994 set will be released at the same time.

The new set redresses some of the complaints about the original. It had seemed odd, for example, that the Beatles’ radio performances of some of their biggest hits, including “Please Please Me,” “She Loves You” and “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” were left off the first set. All three are included here, as are “This Boy,” “Words of Love” and “And I Love Her,” which the earlier set also skipped.

The new set also includes several songs new to the Beatles official discography, including a rocked-up version of Stephen Foster’s “Beautiful Dreamer,” Paul McCartney’s energetic rendering of Little Richard’s “Lucille,” and John Lennon’s biting account of Chuck Berry’s “I’m Talking About You.”  Included, too, is the Beatles version of “Happy Birthday,” recorded to celebrate the anniversary of Saturday Club, one of the shows they performed on.

Three of the tracks have been released previously, including a cover of a Carl Perkins track, “Lend Me Your Comb,” which appeared on the first volume of “The Beatles Anthology.” There is no crossover between the 1994 set and the new album, but several songs from the earlier collection – including “I Saw Her Standing There,” “I Got A Woman,” “Sure To Fall” and “Hippy Hippy Shake” – are heard here in different performances.

All told, the Beatles performed 88 songs on the BBC, most in multiple performances. Among them were 36 songs they never recorded at Abbey Road. Equally significant, though, is the way the BBC recordings were made. Essentially, they were live performances, sometimes with minimal vocal overdubbing. They represent the group’s concert style, which had an edge that their polished studio productions sometimes lacked – but although a few of the BBC recordings were made before live audiences, most were not, and are therefore free of the hysterical shrieking typically heard on even the most professionally recorded Beatles concert tapes.

Among the interviews are individual talks with each Beatle recorded for the Beeb’s Pop Profile program in November 1965 and May 1966. The sets will have notes by Kevin Howlett, a former BBC producer whose 1996 book, “The Beatles at the BBC – The Radio Years 1962-70,” is being republished in a substantially expanded and reconfigured edition as “The Beatles – The BBC Archives 1962-1970,” by Harper Design, in November.

Source: http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/12/another-set-of-beatles-bbc-recordings-is-on-the-way/?_r=0





paul-mccartney.jpg
For Paul McCartney to name an album “New” in 2013 is almost as oblivious—or as brash—as the band Asia naming an album “XXX,” which they did last year. Try searching for information about either of those: in the latter case, you’ll suddenly find yourself looking at a tremendous amount of Japanese pornography; in the former, you’ll get articles about every McCartney project from the past fifteen years. But “New” is something more specific: it’s McCartney’s first collection of original material since “Memory Almost Full,” from 2007.

In the half decade since then, he hasn’t exactly been idle: there’s been a ballet score (“Ocean’s Kingdom”), a collection of standards (“Kisses on the Bottom”), soundtrack-only songs (“(I Want to) Come Home,” from “Everybody’s Fine”), collaborations (“Cut Me Some Slack,” with the two surviving members of Nirvana), and a series of lavish rereleases (most recently, a multi-disk set of the mid-seventies concert “Wings Over America”). The McCartney industry is enjoying such a boom that there is a legitimate question as to the necessity of new material. When there’s so much traffic in what’s old, who needs “New”? The lead single and title track attempt an answer, with instantly loveable Beatle harmonies, a touch of harpsichord, and bright backing vocals. But saying that Paul McCartney wrote a bouncy, prepossessing song on the high side of passable is like saying that a bird laid an egg.

McCartney has been famous at an unimaginable level longer for than nearly anyone else alive. But as he has headed into old age, he has addressed the matter with a kind of relentless professionalism that borders on impersonality. He isn’t Paul Simon, using rueful humor to get a foothold on mortality. He isn’t Bob Dylan, grizzling his way to the grave. He isn’t Neil Young, hurtling from primal enthusiasm to primal enthusiasm, or Leonard Cohen, wisely dissipating into a mist of erotic Buddhism. He’s Paul McCartney, and he’s Paul McCartney now the way that he was Paul McCartney ten years ago, or thirty, generically exhorting listeners to action or reminding them of glory of love or sketching the outlines of a less pleasant emotion (fear, sadness, unregulated anger) without any real specifics. On album after album, McCartney has been content to be a rock star seen from the outside rather than an artist seen from the inside. Fronting Nirvana was only ever going to be a style exercise that yielded a muscular song, quickly forgotten. When he performed at the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Astoria, Queens, last week, his closing remarks to the students were laughably generic, in the Paul McCartney way: “You rock on. You be great. You be lovely in your careers.”

In that sense, “New” is a perfect Paul McCartney album. It’s filled with songs that are without meaning but not meaningless. Whether in the wonderfully eerie “Appreciate,” the lovely, Indian-inflected “Hosanna,” or the happily crack-brained nursery rhyme “Queenie Eye,” McCartney makes songs that work extremely well on their own terms while remaining largely sealed off from anything approaching real or raw emotion. “Alligator” is a sharp, bluesy song whose lyrics, about love’s liberating power, are defiantly characterless: “Could you be that person for me? / Would you feel right setting me free? / Could you dare to find my key?” And “Everybody Out There,” which deploys a full arsenal of McCartneyisms—a descending melody line, spiralling guitar, squiggles of keyboard, and background chanting that will remind people of Mumford & Sons but should remind them of “Mrs. Vanderbilt”—exerts a tremendous amount of energy to put across a platitude: “Do some good before you say goodbye.” The title track might be a love song for his third wife, Nancy Shevell, unless it’s a broad statement regarding universal optimism. “Save Us” (packed with guitar and at least one brilliant rhyme, “battle” and “that’ll”) might be a political manifesto, unless it’s a broad statement about hope. The songs aren’t especially irritating until you think too much about them, at which point you may start to feel foolish—not as a result of their limits but as a result of your own. If you come to a Paul McCartney album looking for ragged candor, you will be left wanting, and that’s not a koan so much as it is a warning label.

Much has been made of the fact that, on “New,” McCartney worked with a series of young producers: Mark Ronson (best known for his work with Amy Winehouse), Paul Epworth (best known for his work with Adele), Ethan Johns (whose father, Glyn, took a crack at early versions of the Beatles’ “Let It Be,” before it was turned over to Phil Spector), and Giles Martin (whose father, George, also had some passing acquaintance with McCartney’s former band). The four of them are responsible for the sound of McCartney’s record, but only in the sense that, when they made it, they made it in his image. “I Can Bet,” produced by Martin, is lightly funky and heavily orchestrated, the kind of thing that Wings was doing around “Back to the Egg.” The dark piano chords of “Road” have nothing on “1985.” And even those rare songs that don’t sound like by-the-numbers extensions of his earlier hits sound like extensions of his earlier experiments—remember, McCartney has been toying with circular composition, atonality, and ambient soundscapes for longer than his producers have been alive. The title of the album is almost comically inaccurate.

That’s especially clear in the record’s most interesting and least characteristic song, “Early Days,” an overt memoir of his Beatle past. Here, the rose-colored glasses come off entirely, as McCartney confesses that he’s wounded that others feel entitled to retell his history. “They can’t take it from me if they try,” he sings. “I lived through those early days / So many times I had to change the pain to laughter / Just to keep from getting crazed.” The details are spare and specific, anchored in time and place: “Dressed from head to toe / Two guitars across our back / We would walk the city road / Seeking someone who would listen to the music / That we were writing down at home.” Wounded, melancholy, and even a little defensive—the melodic callbacks to “Blackbird” are especially confusing (are life rights civil rights?)—“Early Days” is also the rare McCartney song that feels as though it was created honestly, by a real human, rather than strategically, by a corporate director interested primarily in promoting (or at least preserving) his brand. What’s most notable about “Early Days” is how it presents McCartney’s vocals. Johns has stripped away all the artificial sweeteners and busy arrangements and exposed McCartney’s voice for what it really is these days: frail and aged, able to convey sadness not as an effect but as a fact.

Source: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2013/10/the-generic-genius-of-paul-mccartney.html




Photograph: Christopher Polk/Getty for Clear Channel







Track Listing:
October 14th (15th in the US) will see the release of Paul’s first album of brand NEW solo material in six years. 

The track listing has been revealed:

1. Save Us (produced by Paul Epworth)
2. Alligator (produced by Mark Ronson)
3. On My Way To Work (produced by Giles Martin)
4. Queenie Eye (produced by Paul Epworth)
5. Early Days (produced by Ethan Johns)
6. New (produced by Mark Ronson)
7. Appreciate (produced by Giles Martin)
8. Everybody Out There (produced by Giles Martin)
9. Hosanna (produced by Ethan Johns)
10. I Can Bet (produced by Giles Martin)
11. Looking At Her (produced by Giles Martin)
12. Road (produced by Paul Epworth)
13. Turned Out (Deluxe)
14. Get Me Out Of Here (Deluxe)

Executive Producers: Paul McCartney and Giles Martin
Mixed by Mark ‘Spike’ Stent

Total Running Time: 46:11

Talking about the album, Paul said: “It's funny, when I play people the album they’re surprised it’s me. A lot of the tracks are quite varied and not necessarily in a style you'd recognise as mine. I didn't want it to all sound the same. I really enjoyed making this album. It's always great to get a chance to get into the studio with a bunch of new songs and I was lucky to work with some very cool producers. We had a lot of fun.”

Paul worked on the album with producers Paul Epworth, Mark Ronson, Ethan Johns and Giles Martin.Commenting on the process, Paul said: “The original idea was to go to a couple of producers whose work I loved, to see who I got on with best - but it turned out I got on with all of them! We made something really different with each producer, so I couldn’t choose and ended up working with all four. We just had a good time in different ways.”

The album was recorded at Henson Recording Studios, Los Angeles;
Avatar Studios, New York; Abbey Road Studios, London; Air Studios,
London; Wolf Tone Studios, London and Hog Hill Mill, East Sussex.
Source: http://www.paulmccartney.com/news-blogs/news/27639-paul-reveals-tracklisting-for-new-album

From Wikipedia:

Recording

McCartney had initially intended to trial four of his favourite producers and select the best to record the whole album with.[5] McCartney ended up recording with all four: Mark Ronson, Ethan Johns, Paul Epworth and Giles Martin.[3][5] Martin produced the majority of the tracks and acted as executive producer on the album. Recording took place at Henson Recording Studios in Los Angeles; Avatar Studios in New York; Abbey Road Studios, Air Studios and Wolf Tone Studios in London; and The Mill in East Sussex.

Ronson had been selected following his set as DJ at McCartney's wedding to Nancy Shevell two years before production began. The producer noted that he was preoccupied with his own wedding occurring at about the same time as McCartney's, and had nearly forgotten to call him back to accept the offer. A few months after Ronson served as DJ for another McCartney event in New York, Ronson received a call inviting him into the studio. In total Ronson recorded three tracks: "New", "Alligator" and "Secret Life of a Party Girl", although the third track does not appear on the album.[6]

Composition

"I just started knocking something out on the piano, he started drumming to it, and I stuck a bit of bass on it and we had the basis of the song worked out."[7]
—McCartney on songwriting with Epworth, BBC News, August 2013

McCartney has said that the album would be "very varied. I worked with four producers and each of them brought something different".[7] The songs produced by Paul Epworth "weren't written" but improvised.[7] The title track, "New", is a "love song but it's saying don't look at me I haven't got any answers. It says I don't know what's happening, I don't know how it's all happening, but it's good and I love you."[7]

Other tracks are biographical: "On My Way to Work" was written about his pre-fame past alluding to his time working as a driver's mate for Speedy Prompt Delivery in Liverpool.[8] Similarly on the day McCartney composed "Early Days", he had been reminiscing about his past in Liverpool with John Lennon: "I started to get images of us in the record shop listening to early rock and roll and looking at the posters and the joy that that gave me remembering all those moments."[9]

Regarding contemporary inspirations, McCartney expressed that the album had been influenced by his marriage to Shevell: "This is a happy period in my life, having a new woman — so you get new songs when you get a new woman." He felt that New is generally joyful, but with an undercurrent of "pain getting changed to laughter".[9] Ronson referred to the song "Alligator" in particular as being "brooding" and "quite tough".[6] McCartney wrote "Everybody Out There" specifically to "get the audience singing along" and that he was particularly proud of "Early Days" and the hidden track "Scared".[10]


Promotion


A "drive-in" listening event took place at the Open Road car dealership in Manhattan.

"New" was released as a single to the iTunes Store and SoundCloud on 28 August 2013.[3] The single came with the announcement that the album would be released on 14 October in the United Kingdom, and a day later in the United States.[7] A deluxe edition was also announced featuring two bonus tracks.[3] An official McCartney Instagram account launched at the same time the album was revealed.[11] McCartney debuted the songs "Save Us" and "Everybody Out There" at the third annual iHeartRadio Music Festival.[12]

On 23 September 2013, McCartney's news blog unveiled the final artwork for New, replacing the earlier minimal black and white logo used as a placeholder for online retailers. The logo and cover concept was conceived by UK art and design team Rebecca and Mike, with CGI created by Ben Ib. The imagery of fluorescent lights was inspired by the sculptural work of Dan Flavin.[13][14] The titles of the deluxe edition bonus tracks were also announced: "Turned Out" and "Get Me Out of Here".[13] Promotion later included a Twitter interview on 4 October, when McCartney answered fan questions related to the album.[10]

On 6 October, full-album listening events took place in the form of drive-ins: in the Los Angeles area fans brought their vehicles to the Vinland Drive-In, whereas in New York City listeners were taken to the rooftop of an Open Road Volkswagen dealership to sit in new cars belonging to the company.[15] The drive-in idea came about late into the promotional campaign, when McCartney had been listening to the album in his own car about a week before the event took place.[16]

On 10 October, McCartney and his band performed a surprise concert in Times Square after posting two short tweets announcing the event about an hour before it occurred.[17] The brief performance consisted of four tracks off the album ("New," "Save Us," "Everybody Out There," and "Queenie Eye"), lasting about fifteen minutes. The event gathered a large crowd and came a day after another surprise concert to 400 students at Frank Sinatra School for the Arts in Queens, New York. The performance at the school was filmed and will be streamed on Yahoo! on October 14.[18]

Reception

The first track to be released, "New", was greeted positively by critics and the musical press. As well as being selected as BBC Radio 2's Record of the Week[7][26] and placed on their A-list,[27] the track was greeted as the 'Track of the Day' by Mojo which praised its "doe-eyed optimism, irresistible melody" and "orchestrated pop arrangements".[28] Rolling Stone's Will Hermes, praised its "bouncy harpsichord-laden melody", giving it a four-star rating and drawing comparisons to the Beatles' "Got to Get You into My Life",[29] a view shared by The Daily Telegraph which described it as a "jaunty, Beatles-esque stomp".[30]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_%28album%29





Newly remastered for reissue, The Beatles' first Live at the BBC album sounds and looks better than ever. This collection of the group's BBC sessions mixed versions of their hits with a treasure trove of 30 songs The Beatles performed on air but never released on record in the 1960s. The compelling track list ranged from a rare performance of the little known Lennon-McCartney original 'I'll Be On My Way' to covers of classic rock 'n' roll and contemporary rhythm and blues songs. At the time of its release, Live at the BBC was hailed by Rolling Stone as 'an exhilarating portrait of a band in the process of shaping its own voice and vision.'. It earned a GRAMMY Award nomination for Best Historical Album.


Live at the BBC was assembled by George Martin in 1994.









It is available for pre-order from Amazon.com here:
http://www.amazon.com/Live-At-The-BBC-Remastered/dp/B00F4BJ4M0


The Beatles
1962-1968
Unsurpassed Broadcasts
(Second Edition)



Teenager's Turn rcd 7th March / txd 8th March 1962
01. Dream Baby A
02. Memphis Tennessee A
03. Please Mr. Postman A
Here We Go rcd 11th June / txd 15th June 1962
04. Ask Me Why A
05. Besame Mucho A
06. A Picture Of You A
07. Interview with Monty Lister part 1 P
08. A Taste Of Honey (excerpt from People And Places tv show) A
09. Interview with Monty Lister part 2 P
10. Love Me Do (single version)
Here We Go rcd 16th Jan / txd 25th Jan 1963
11. Chains (excerpts) A
12. Please Please Me (incomplete) A
13. Ask Me Why (incomplete) A
Saturday Club rcd 22nd Jan / txd 26th Jan 1963
14. Some Other Guy G
15. Announcer M
16. Love Me Do M
17. Please Please Me (excerpts) C
18. Keep Your Hands Off My Baby A
19. Beautiful Dreamer G
The Talent Spot rcd 22nd Jan / txd 29th Jan 1963
20. Ask Me Why A
Here We Go rcd 6th March / txd 12th March 1963
21. Misery A
22. Do You Want To Know A Secret? A
23. Please Please Me A
Saturday Club txd live 16th March 1963
24. I Saw Her Standing There A
25. Chat A
26. Misery A
27. Too Much Monkey Business G
28. I'm Talking About You C
29. Chat A
30. Please Please Me A
31. Hippy Hippy Shake A
Easy Beat rcd 3rd April / txd 7th April 1963
32. Gerry Marsden A
33. From Me To You A



Swinging Sound '63 recorded 18th April 1963 / txd live
01. Twist And Shout A, C
02. From Me To You A
Side By Side recorded 1st April 1963 / txd 22nd April 1963
03. Side By Side Theme (partial) H
04. Chat / Do You Want To Know A Secret? (fragment) P
Side By Side recorded 1st April 1963 / txd 13th May 1963
05. Chat P
06. Long Tall Sally A
07. Chat A
08. A Taste Of Honey A
09. Chains A
10. Chat A
11. Thank You Girl A
12. Chat A
13. Boys A
Side By Side recorded 4th April 1963 / txd 24th June 1963
14. Side By Side Theme A
15. Announcer A
16. Too Much Monkey Business A
17.Chat A
18. Boys A
19. Chat A
20. I'll Be On Way A
21. From Me To You A
Saturday Club recorded 21st May 1963 / txd 25th May 1963
22. Announcer A
23. I Saw Her Standing There A, P
24. Chat A
25. Do You Want To Know A Secret? A
26. Boys A
27.Chat A
28. Long Tall Sally A
29. Chat A
30. From Me To You A
31. Money A
Steppin' Out recorded 21st May 1963 / txd 3rd June 1963
32. Please Please Me A
33. I Saw Her Standing There A
Pop Go The Beatles (1) recorded 24th May 1963 / txd 4th June 1963
34. Announcer A
35. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby A
36.Chat A
37. Do You Want To Know A Secret? A
38. Announcer A
39. You Really ot A Hold On Me A
40. Misery A
41. Chat A
42. The Hippy Hippy Shake A




Pop Go The Beatles (2) recorded 1st June 1963 / txd 11th June 1963
01. Too Much Monkey Business A
02. Chat A
03. I Got To Find My Baby A
04. Announcer A
05. Young Blood A
06. Announcer A
07. Till There Was You A
08. Chat A
09. Baby It's You A
10. Announcer A
11. Love Me Do A
12. Pop Go The Beatles (long theme) A
Pop Go The Beatles (3) recorded 1st June 1963 / txd 18th June 1963
13. Pop Go The Beatles (short theme) A
14. Announcer A
15. A Shot Of Rythm And Blues A
16. Chat X
17. Memphis Tennessee X
18. Chat A
19. A Taste Of Honey A
20. Announcer A
21. Sure To Fall A
22. Announcer A
23. Money A
24. Chat X
25. From Me To You X
Easy Beat recorded 19th June 1963 / txd 23rd June 1963
26. Some Other Guy A
27. Chat J
28. A Taste Of Honey J
29. Thank You Girl A
30. Announcer A
31. From Me To You A
Pop Go The Beatles recorded 17thJune 1963 / txd 25th June 1963
32. I Saw Her Standing There A
33. Announcer A
34. Anna A
35. Chat A
36. Chat A
37. Boys B
38. Chat L
39. Chains L
40. Chat M
41. P.S. I Love You M
42. Chat M
43. Twist And Shout M
44. Announcer M
45. Pop Go The Beatles (long theme) A
Saturday Club recorded 24th June 1963 / txd 29th June 1963
46. I Got To Find My Baby A
47. Chat A
48. Memphis Tennessee A
49. MoneyA
50. Till There Was You A
51. Chat A
52. From Me To You A
53. Roll Over Beethoven A
The Beat Show recorded 3rd July1963 / txd 4th July 1963
54. A Taste Of Honey A
55. Twist And Shout A



Pop Go The Beatles (5) rcd 2nd July / txd 16th July 1963
01. Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
02. Announcer P
03. That's All Right Mama P
04. Chat P
05. There's A Place A
06. Announcer D
07. Carol D
08. Chat D
09. Soldier Of Love D, A
10. Announcer D
11. Lend Me Your Comb D
12. Chat D
13. Clarabella D
Announcer P
Easy Beat rcd 17th July / txd 21st July 1963
14. I Saw Her Standing There A
15. Shot Of Rhythm And Blues A
16. There's A Place A
17. Twist And Shout A
Pop Go The Beatles (6) rcd 10th July / txd 23rd July 1963
18. Chat P
19. Sweet Little Sixteen B
20. Chat P
21. A Taste Of Honey B
22. Announcer A
23. Nothin' Shakin B'
24. Announcer A
25. Love Me Do B
26. Chat B
27. Lonesome Tears In My Eyes B
28. Chat A
29. So How Come No One Loves Me B
30. Announcer A
31. Pop Go The Beatles (long version) A
Pop Go The Beatles (7) rcd 10th July / txd 30th July 1963
32. Memphis Tennessee A, B
33. Chat A
34. Do You Want To Know A Secret? A
35. Chat A
36. Till There Was You A
37. Chat B
38. Matchbox B
39. Announcer A
40. Please Mr. Postman O, A
41. Chat A
42. The Hippy Hippy Shake B
43. Announcer A
44. Pop Go The Beatles (long version) A
Pop Go The Beatles (8) rcd 16th July / txd 6th August1963
45. Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
46. Announcer A
47. I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You) B
48. Chat A, M
49. Crying, Waiting, Hoping M
50. Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey Hey A,
51. Announcer A
52. To Know Her Is To Love Her M
53. Chat M
54. The Honeymoon Song M
55. Announcer A
56. Twist And Shout A
57. Announcer A
58. Pop Go The Beatles (long version) A


Pop Go The Beatles (9) rcd 16th July / txd 13th August 1963
01. Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
02. Announcer A
03. Long Tall Sally B
04. Announcer A
05. Please Please Me A
06. Announcer A
07. She Loves You A
08. Announcer A
09. You Really Got A Hold On Me A
10. Announcer A
11. I'll Get You A
12. I Got A Woman B
13. Announcer A
14. Pop Go The Beatles (long version) A
Pop Go The Beatles (10) rcd 16th July / txd 20th August 1963
15. She Loves You A
16. Announcer A
17. Words Of Love A
18. Announcer A
19. Glad All Over B
20. Announcer A
21. I Just Don't Understand B
22. Announcer A
23. Devil In Her Heart B
24. Announcer A
25. Slow Down B
Saturday Club rcd 30th July / txd 24th August 1963
26. Long Tall Sally H
27. She Loves You A
28. Glad All Over X
29. Chat X
30. Twist And Shout X
31. Chat X
32. You Really Got A Hold On Me
33. I'll Get You X
Pop Go The Beatles (11) rcd 1st August / txd 27th August 1963
34. Ooh! My Soul A
35. Chat B
36. Don't Ever Change B
37. Twist And Shout A
38. Chat A
39. She Loves You A
40. Announcer A
41. Anna A
42. A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues B
Pop Go The Beatles (12) rcd 1st August / txd 3rd September 1963
43. Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
44. Announcer A
45. From Me To You A
46. I'll Get You A
47. Chat A
48. Money A
49. Announcer A
50. There's A Place A
51. Honey Don't B
52. Chat A
53. Roll Over Beethoven A



Non Stop Pop rcd 30th July / txd 30th Aug 1963
01. 'Pop Chat' interview with Phil Tate - Q
Pop Go The Beatles (13) rcd 3rd Sept / txd 10th Sept 1963
02 Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
03. Announcer A
04. Too Much Monkey Business B
05. Chat A
06. Love Me Do A
07. Chat A
08. She Loves You A
09. I'll Get You A
10. Chat A
11. A Taste Of Honey A
12. Chat M
13. The Hippy Hippy Shake M
Pop Go The Beatles (14) rcd 3rd Sept / txd 17th Sept 1963
14. Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
15. Announcer A
16. Chains A
17. Chat A
18. You Really Got A Hold On Me A
19 Misery A
20. Announcer A
21. Lucille A
22. Announcer A
23. From Me To You A
24. 'Brackets!' A
25. Chat A
26. Boys A
Pop Go The Beatles (15) rcd 3rd Sept / txd 24th Sept 1963
27. Pop Go The Beatles (short version) A
28. Announcer A
29. She Loves You A
30. Announcer A
31. Ask Me Why A
32. Announcer A
33. Devil In My Heart A
34. Chat A
35. I Saw Her Standing There A
36. Chat M
37. Sure To Fall M
38. Chat A
39. Twist And Shout A
40. Announcer / Theme From The Flowerpot Men A
41. Pop Go The Beatles (long version) A
Saturday Club rcd 7th Sept / txd 5th Oct 1963
42. Saturday Jump / Announcer A
43. I Saw Her Standing There J
44. Memphis Tennesse A, J
45. Happy Birthday Saturday Club J
46. Continuity / Announcer Q
47. I'll Get You J
48. Announcer
49. She Loves You J
50. Lucille J
51. Announcer / Saturday Jump A
Easy Beat rcd 16th Oct / txd 20th Oct 1963
52. Announcer A
53. I Saw Her Standing There A
54. Announcer A
55. Love Me Do A
56. Please Please Me A
57. Chat A
58. From Me To You A
59. She Loves You A



Radio Newsreel rcd 16th Oct 1963 / txd 16th Oct 1963
01. Interview with Peter Woods - Q
The Ken Dodd Show rcd 3rd Oct 1963 / txd 3rd Nov 1963
02. She Loves You C
The Public Ear rcd 9th Oct 1963 / txd 3rd Nov 1963
03. Interview with Michael Colley - Q
Saturday Club rcd 17th Dec 1963 / txd 21st Dec 1963
04. All My Loving A
05. Chat M
06. This Boy M
07. All I Want For Christmas A
Chat A
08. I Want To Hold Your Hand A
09. Till There Was You A
10. Roll Over Beethoven A
11. Chat A
12. She Loves You J
13. Crimble Medley A
From Us To You (1) rcd 18th Dec 1963 / txd 26th Dec 1963
14. From Us To You M
15. Announcer M
16. She Loves You A
17. Announcer A
18. All My Loving A
19. Roll Over Beethoven A
20. Chat A
21. Till There Was You A
22. Chat C
23. Chat A
24. Boys A
25. Money M
26. I Saw Her Standing There A
27. Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport M
28. Chat M
29. I Want To Hold Your Hand Z
30. Announcer M
31. From Us To You A
Saturday Club rcd 7th Feb 1964 / txd 8th Feb 1964
32. Malcolm Davis in New York - Z
33. Interview with Murray The 'K' - Z
34. Interviews with fans at Kennedy Airport - Z
35. Arrival at Kennedy Airport - Z
36. Interviews with fans outside Plaza Hotel - Z
37. Beatles phone interview with Brian Matthew - Z
BONUS TRACKS:
Dateline London rcd 10th Dec 63 / txd early 1964
38. Interview with Dibbs Mather for the BBC Transcription Service - P, K
From Us To You (1) rcd 18th Dec 1963 / txd 26th Dec 1963
39. I Want To Hold Your Hand (1996 BBC edit) M
40. I Want To Hold Your Hand (1996 edit with missing sections inserted) M, Z


Saturday Club rcd 7th Jan / txd 15th Feb 1964
01. Announcer A
All My Loving A
02. Money A
03. Chat A
04. The Hippy Hippy Shake A
05.Chat A
06. I Want To Hold Your Hand (rcd 17th Dec 1963) A
07. Roll Over Beethoven A
08. Announcer A
09. Johnny B. Goode A
10. Announcer A
11. I Wanna Be Your Man A
Saturday Club rcd 22nd Feb / txd 22nd Feb 1964
12. Phone interview with Brian Matthew
from London Airport - Z
The Public Ear rcd 18th March / txd 22nd March 1964
13. Letter from listener / Ringo - Q
14. George and Ringo request tk1 - Q
15. George and Ringo request tk2 - N
16. John reads from In His Own Write - Q
17. George and Ringo read the credits - Q
From Us To You (2) rcd 28th Feb / txd 30th March 1964
18. From Us To You A
19. Announcer A
20.. You Can't Do That A
21. Chat J
22. Roll Over Beethoven J
23. Chat J, A
24. Till There Was You J
25. Chat J
26. I Wanna Be Your Man J
27. Chat A
28. Please Mr. Postman F
29. All My Loving J
30. Chat A,
31. This Boy W
32. Chat A, O
33. Can't Buy Me Love J
34. Announcer A
35. From Us To You J, F
Saturday Club rcd 31st March / txd 4th April 1964
36. Announcer A
37. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby A
38. Announcer A
39. I Call Your Name A
40. I Got A Woman E
41. Chat J, A
42. You Can't Do That J
43. Chat A
44. Can't Buy Me Love A
45. Chat J,A
46. Sure To Fall J
47. Long Tall Sally E



From Us To You (3) rcd 1st May / txd 18th May 1964
01. From Us To You A
02. Chat / Whit Monday To You A
03. I Saw Her Standing There A
04. Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey Hey A
05. Chat A
06. I Forgot To Remember To Forget A
07. Chat A
08. You Can't Do That A
09. Sure To Fall A
10. Chat A
11. Can't Buy Me Love A
12. Chat A
13. Matchbox A
14. Honey Don't A
15. From Us to You A
Top Gear rcd 14th July / txd 16th July 1964
16. Promo Q
17. Promo (outtake) Q
18. Long Tall Sally J
19. Announcer A
20. Things We Said Today J
21. Chat J
22. A Hard Day's Night J
23. Chat J, A
24. And I Love Her J
25. Announcer's intro to album track A
26. If I Fell A
27. You Can't Do That A
28. Announcer / Top Gear Theme A
From Us To You (4) rcd 17th July / txd 3rd August 1964
29. From Us To You A
30. Chat A
31. Long Tall Sally A
32. If I Fell A
33. I'm Happy Just To Dance With You A
34. Chat A
35. Things We Said Today A
36. I Should Have Know Better A
37. Chat A
38. Boys A
39. Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey Hey A
40. It's For You (performed by Cilla Black) A
41. Chat A
42. A Hard Day's Night A
43. From Us To You A
BONUS TRACKS:
From Us To You (4) recording session 17th July 1964
44. From Us To You (outtake) A
45. From Us To You (no voice-over) A
46. I'm Happy Just To Dance With You (backing track) A
47. I Should Have Known Better (false start) A
48. I Should Have Known Better (no harmonica / single-tracked vocal) A
Top Gear recording session 17th Nov 1964
49. I'll Follow The Sun (outtake) P
50. Studio chat / I Feel fine (false start) Q
51. I Feel Fine (single-tracked vocal) Q
52. Studio chat Q




Top Gear rcd 17th Nov / txd 26th Nov 196
01. Chat A
02. I'm A Loser B
03. Chat A
04. Honey Don't (edited by Transcription Services) J
05. She's A Woman B
06. Chat J
07. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby B
08. I'll Follow The Sun B
09. Chat A
10. I Feel Fine B
Saturday Club rcd 25th Nov / txd 26th Dec 1964
11. Announcer A
12. Rock And Roll Music J
13. Chat A
14. I'm A Loser (rcd 17th Nov 1964) J
15. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby (rcd 17th Nov 1964) J
16. Chat A
17. I Feel Fine (rcd 17th Nov 1964) J
18. Chat A
19. Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey Hey J
20. Announcer A
21. She's A Woman (rcd 17th Nov 1964) J
Pop Inn txd live 13th April 1965
22. Interview with Keith Fordyce - M
The Beatles Invite You To Take A Ticket To Ride rcd 26th May / txd 7th June 1965
23. Ticket To Ride (extract) J
24. Announcer A
25. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby A
26. I'm A Loser A
27. Chat A
28. The Night Before A
29. Honey Don't A, Z
30. Chat A
31. Dizzy Miss Lizzy J
32. She's A Woman A
33. Announcer A
34. Ticket To Ride (with 'bye now' intro) A, J
BONUS TRACKS:
Top Of The Pops show 32 (*) rcd Spring 1965 / txd July 1965 (overseas only)
35. Chat O
36. Chat O
37. Ticket To Ride (with clean intro - rcd 26th May 1965) J
British Information Service rcd 30th July 1965 / txd 1965
38. Interview with Dibbs Mather for the BBC Transcription
Service (broadcast in the US only) N
Top Gear rcd 17th Nov / txd 26th Nov 1964
39. Honey Don't (unedited original version) A



The World Of Books rcd 16th June / txd 3rd July 1965
01. John discusses his writing and drawing with Wilfred De'Ath - Q, K
The Beatles Abroad rcd August 1965 / txd 30th Aug 1965
02. US tour interviews with Brian Matthew - Q
Pop Profile rcd 30th Nov 1965 / txd March 1966
03. John talks with Brian Matthew - Q
Pop Profile rcd 30th Nov 1965 / txd March 1966
04. George talks with Brian Matthew - Q
Saturday Club rcd 29th Nov 1965 / txd 25th Dec 1965
05. Chat with Brian Matthew (unedited session tape) A
Saturday Club rcd 2nd May 1966 / txd 4th June 1966
06. Chat with Brian Matthew - P
Pop Profile rcd 2nd May 1966 / txd 1966
07. Ringo talks with Brian Matthew - Q
Pop Profile rcd 2nd May 1966 / txd 1966
08. Paul talks with Brian Matthew - Q
The Lennon And McCartney Songbook rcd 6th Aug / txd 29th Aug 1966
09. John and Paul talk with Keith Fordyce - P, Q
Top Of The Pops rcd 20th March 1967 / txd 1967 (overseas only)
10. Penny Lane (extract)
John and Paul talk with Brian Matthew - Q
Scene And Heard 13th Sept / txd 30th Sept 1967
11. Interview with George - Q
Where It's At rcd Nov 1967 / txd 25th Nov 1967
12. John talks with Kenny Everett and Chris Denning (extracts) - Q
13. All Together On The Wireless Machine (Paul, Kenny Everett & Chris Denning) M, P


The Lennon And McCartney Songbook rcd 6th Aug / txd 29th Aug 1966
01. John And Paul Talk To Keith Fordyce
The Ivor Novello Awards For 1966 rcd 20th March / txd 27th March 1967
02. Pesentation And Interview with Brian Matthew
Top Of The Pops Show 127 rcd 20th March / txd May 1967 (OS only)
03. John And Paul talk with Brian Matthew
Where It's At rcd May / txd 20th May 1967
04. Paul Promo
05. John Introduces Sgt. Pepper
06. Ringo talks with Kenny Everett
07. John Introduces Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds
08. John talks to Kenny Everett
09. Paul talks to Kenny Everett
10. Paul talks to Kenny Everett
11. Paul Promo
Where It's At rcd June / txd 1st July 1967
12. Paul talks with Kenny Everett
Scene And Heard rcd 13th Sept / txd 30th Sept 1967
13. George Talks with Kenny Everett
Scene And Heard rcd 13th Sept / txd 7th Oct 1967
14. George Talks with Kenny Everett
Scene And Heard rcd 14th Sept / txd 14th Oct 1967
15. Ringo talks with Miranda Ward
Where It's At rcd Nov / txd 25th Nov 1967
16. John talks with Kenny Everett and Chris Denning
Kenny Everett rcd 6th June 1968 / txd 9th June 1968
17. John talks with Kenny Everett
18. Unedited Chat with John, Paul and Ringo
BONUS TRACK
19. All Together On The Wireless Machine (Paul Jingle)



01. From Us To You Theme (Edited)
02. All My Loving
03. Chat
04. Till There Was You
05. Chat
06. Roll Over Beethoven
07. Chat
08. I Wanna Be Your Man
09. Chat
10. Can't Buy Me Love
11. From Us To You Theme (Edited)
12. Opening Theme
13. Link
14. Link
15. Long Tall Sally
16. Chat
17. A Hard Days Night
18. Link
19. Things We Said Today
20. Closing Theme And Sign-off
21. Opening Theme And Link
22. A Long Nose
23. Link
24. I'm A Loser
25. Chat
26. She's A Woman
27. Link
28. I Feel Fine
29. Closing Theme And Sign-off
30. Chat
31. I'll Follow The Sun
32. Chat
33. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby
34. I Feel Fine
35. Opening Theme
36. Link
37. Chat
38. Kansas City
39. Link
40. Honey Don't
41. Link
42. Rock And Roll Music
43. Closing Theme And Sign-off
44. Opening Theme
45. Link
46. Link
47. Dizzy Miss Lizzy
48. Chat
49. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby
50. Link
51. Ticket To Ride
52. Closing Theme And Sign-off
53. Chat (1967)
54. Alternate Intro To Show 00
55. Alternate Links For Things We Said Today

Sources:
The From Us To You special is reconstructed from the 1982 Beatles At The Beeb retrospective and the Westwood one cds of 'The BBC Beatles Tapes'. Most of the Top Of The Pops shows are from lossless copies of the original transcription discs, except for Show 8 where I had to take excerpts from 'The
Beeb's Lost Beatles Tapes'. That show also provided the 1967 appearance, and the 1982 special provided the final track.




Complete BBC sessions on 13 CD

The following sources were used:
A = At The Beeb Vols 1-12 (Yellow Dog 2002)
B = Live At The BBC (Masterfraction 2002)
C = The Complete BBC Sessions (Purple Chick 2004)
X = BBC Trailer Collection (Yellow Dog 1999)
J = The BBC Beatles Tapes: The Original Masters (1990)
Vinyl:
D = Four By The Beatles (1979 EP)
E = The Beatles Broadcasts (Circuit Records 1980)
F = Rough Notes (Unknown - 1978)
G = The Beatles At The Beeb With Pete Best (Drexel 1988)
H = Rare Unreleased Beatles Tracks (Picture disc 1985)
W = Johnny & The Moondogs: Silver Days (Warwick 1981)
Z = The Beatles At The Beeb Vols 1-14 (Beeb Transcription Records 1986-89)
O = The Beatles At The Beeb (1983 special)
Tape:
Q= The Beeeb's Lost Beatles Tapes (1988 special)
K = In My Life: John Lennon Remembered (1990 special)
L = The Beatles At The BBC (1996 special)
M = The Beatles At The Beeb (2009 special)
N = The Beatles Story (1972 special)
P = private tape

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Much of the Beatles unreleased material used to be in the hands of the non-traditional record companies. Well now the Internet has changed all that with many collectors posting this material to share with the world. The Purple Chick label last year released a series of collections for all Beatles concerts and studio albums with improved artwork and audio quality. Below are some liner notes from the 10 CD set "The Complete Live at the BBC Sessions - Upgraded for 2004". As well as a link below on where to get it. You can also Google it to find it many other places.

The Complete BBC Sessions - Great Dane's Liner Notes.

BBC Light Programme - Stay Tuned!

On 7 March 1962 the Beatles entered a BBC studio for their first session. It was the beginning of a long relationship between the group and BBC radio and was of tremendous importance for their success. These sessions are among the most important documents of the Beatles' music for two main reasons. First of all, the BBC had regulations limiting the number of discs which could be played during the transmissions, so whenever possible the songs were performed live in their studios. The Beatles did not escape this rule, and each number to be broadcast, including their hits, was recorded live a few days or weeks before being aired. Some of these BBC versions can hardly be distinguished from the commercially released ones, but often slight differences (particularly in guitar solos) can be appreciated. In a few cases the songs were played in noticeably different arrangements, and there are even BBC sessions which unquestionably beat the takes recorded at Abbey Road studios: "Honey Don't", Pop Go The Beatles, September 3, 1963; "I Saw Her Standing There", Easy Beat, October 20, 1963; "Rock And Roll Music", Saturday Club, December 26, 1964; "Long Tall Sally", Top Gear, July 16, 1964, are but a few examples. But the real gems of these sessions are all the classics of the fifties and early sixties rock and pop music, performed on BBC and never commercially released by the group.

Why did the Beatles play these songs instead of only promoting their records? At the beginning, they had not yet released enough songs to fill all the programmes, nearly one a week. Later, these performances added exciting surprises to fans waiting to hear their favourite group playing live on the BBC. As a result, these programmes were very similar to their live stage performances. A BBC session also provided the opportunity to try out covers which could later be commercially released. Only on the last shows did the Beatles limit themselves to promoting the commercial releases: by late 1963 they had already conquered the world, and fans just wanted to hear the songs found on the records. What's sure is that the boys had great fun in the BBC studios, joking with the announcers or reading letters from fans; some of the chats in-between the songs are as pleasant as the musical performances. The influences which were important to each of the Beatles also can be recognized. John, for example, was a great fan of Chuck Berry. He sang eight Berry songs, always with great personality, and he had great pleasure in covering Arthur Alexander's tunes. Paul sang powerful covers of Little Richards' numbers which very closely match the original version. But he also was attracted to popular music hits, such as a "rock" version of "Besame Mucho" and the title song from the film "Honeymoon". George, beside performing a few classics, often played a different, more rockabilly rendition of the guitar solos than on the commercially released songs; his covers of Carl Perkins' records are unforgettable. Ringo, apart from his occasional numbers, always displays a very precise rhythm.

The Beatles performed ninety different songs on BBC radio, two of which were taped but not broadcast ("Sheila" and "Three Cool Cats"). Some of these were played many times (usually their hits which were to be promoted, such as "From Me To You", featured in 15 different programmes, but also unreleased songs, such as "Memphis, Tennessee" which had five appearances); many other songs were executed just once, for a total of 288 transmitted performances, including occasional renditions of traditional tunes ("Happy Birthday", etc.). In a few cases, a song was taped once and broadcast on two different programmes. Thirty-six songs have not been commercially released, and many other numbers, later included on their LPs, were presented on BBC radio months or even more than a year before their eventual release. Indeed, considering the few, often low-quality, live concerts available, the BBC sessions represent a true mirror of how the "live Beatles" were on stage. This explains the immense interest of these tracks.

We will not fool anyone by saying that this material has not been previously available to collectors (although two of the programmes and some other songs here included have never been released in any form ). However, it is true that until now all these songs were scattered among many different sources, so that a comprehensive collection would need various LPs, CDs and a few of the tapes which have been traded since the early seventies. Also, sound quality was in general not fully satisfying, at least for many sources. The BBC itself preserved very few programmes in its archives. This is the first attempt to organize all the material available to collectors in the most complete form, chronologically arranged, and with the best possible sound quality. To achieve this aim, we have checked every available source for each track, and in some cases fragments from different sources had to be edited to restore the song the way it was originally performed and in its best possible quality (this is, for example, the case with "Ooh! My Soul", "So How Come (No One Loves Me)", one of the "Memphis" takes, and a few others). Obviously, all our efforts have been addressed to recreate the original sound as it was broadcast about thirty years ago, avoiding any kind of alteration. All this material has been chronologically arranged according to the transmission date (not the recording session date). To provide collectors, and also "normal" Beatles listeners, with the best possible sound quality, DAT masters have been processed with Sonic Solutions software, a powerful digital medium which has helped editing and equalizing. Whenever possible, the particularly boring tape drop-outs have been corrected. Over 100 hours were spent at the mastering studios (plus the hours spent at home checking each track ...), but the results are encouraging, and we hope it's been worthwhile. A few of the original tapes were of really low quality; in these cases there's not much to be done but try to cut background noise to recover the sound; of course, sound distorsions can only be attenuated. However, apart from these very few tracks, the general quality of the recordings is noticeably good. We have mainly been concerned with the musical performances, so we apologize if a few seconds of chat is missing. We also apologize for any mistakes that may have occurred, we tried our best, but no one is perfect. The interview-only programmes have not been included, nor have the TV shows which had also a radio airing. The programme themes which were taped only once and used for all the numbers in the series (such as "Pop Go The Beatles") have been included in the first programme of the series only. The theme of "From Us To You" has always been included.

We hope you'll enjoy these CDs and invite you to write your comments to Great Dane Records, "Beatles projects", Via L. Manara 5, 20122 Milano, Italy. This will help us to make our future projects better. Of the 288 performances which were aired, 247 have been recovered and are included on these CDs. It should be very interesting to rediscover the lost tracks; should any Beatle collector have tapes from BBC programmes (from unidentified as well as already known programms, and even if in poor quality), we'll be glad to hear from him/her. If we find some of the apparently lost tracks, an updated release can be pressed!

This work would not have been possible without the help of many friends and collectors who provided tapes or useful information. Our deepest thanks in particular to Werner, Maurizio, Arno, Doug, U. G. Beanwaste, Dr. Cod and Dr. Moody. DAT masters processed at Audio Time Studios, Digital Post-Production, Cologno Monzese (Milano, Italy). Sound engineering by Marco Lacchini and Massimo Meregalli. Photos of the records by Ezio Degam, Settimo Torinese (Torino, Italy). Art direction by Erlab (Rome, Italy).

Previous Releases

Considering the tremendous importance of the material performed and broadcast in the fifty-two BBC sessions, it is no surprise that many LP and, lately, CD releases have appeared. It is not possible to detail every single production here but some notes on the most important records nevertheless should be of interest. These notes are derived from a forthcoming book which will report on every known unofficial Beatles record.

The first record to contain Beatles BBC radio performances, and one of the most important Beatles bootlegs from the historical point of view, was released in August 1971 by TMOQ (Trade Mark of Quality), a legendary California company which produced, from 1970 to 1975, more than a hundred different unofficial records by many top rock and pop groups. This first record was titled "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD" and contained 14 "BBC" songs, thirteen of which were never recorded for EMI (the other one was "Slow Down"). These were derived from the Pop Go The Beatles programmes of July and August 1963. The first pressing of this LP had the typical coloured cardboard jacket of TMOQ, with a round sticker with a pig logo, rubber-stamped title (reading "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD - PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED STUDIO MATERIAL"), round a label with a large 1 or 2 for side indicators, and coloured vinyl. Its sound quality was reasonably good. The matrix number was BBL-513. It became one of the most sought-after items by Beatles collectors, and during the seventies (and into the eighties) the stamper BBL-513 was used for a great number of repressings, with differences in labels and sleeve, and coloured as well as black, or even multicoloured, vinyl. The issues released from 1973 to 1976 also had the catalogue number 71032 printed on a slipsheet. A different tape, including the same songs in slightly superior sound quality, was used in late 1971 or early 1972 by another outfit known to collectors as White Cover Folks, probably from the eastern coast of the USA. This had the matrix number YMC-101, the same title, "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD", a red label marked "Yellow Records", and a track listing. After a few reissues, it was repressed in 1975 from the original stampers by Berkeley Records, with the misleading title "THE DECCA AUDITION TAPES". These two original LPs were copied by other manufacturers. The TMOQ record gave rise to the Contra Band Music (CBM) issues, which first appeared in early 1972 on a 2-LP set titled "DON'T PASS ME BY", matrix CBM 2C1/2D1. This set included the Christmas records and, as second disc, TMOQ LP with the addition of "The Saints" and "My Bonnie" from the Polydor Hamburg record. Starting in May 1973, this second disc was also distributed as a single LP with the usual title "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD". There were repressings (often of poor quality) until 1976. The "Yellow Records" version was copied by Dittolino Discs and issued in 1972 and 1973; this producer originally released it in a cover rubber-stamped with "14 UNRELEASED EARLY BEATLES CUTS". The subsequent editions had an insert titled "AS SWEET AS YOU ARE" (from the song "Don't Ever Change"). The stamper used for these issues was numbered D-1/2. In September 1976 it reappeared for K.O. Records (a name used by the Wizards group). The "Yellow Records" release was also copied by TMOQ-Smokin' Pig (to be distinguished from the original TMOQ by the Smoking Pig logo on their labels), for an LP released in 1973 and again titled "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD" (matrix and catalogue number 1858). In summer 1975 Wizardo Records reproduced the thirteen unreleased songs, together with a few other BBC tracks copied from other records, on the LP "ORIGINAL AUDITION TAPE CIRCA 1962" (another misleading title... - and they knew it!). Other issues date from the mid-eighties, with a European fake "CBM" titled "AS SWEET AS JOU ARE" (sic!) and a "new" "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD" version pressed by Starlight Records in 1990. The songs on the latter were taken from sources of better sound quality, and six more tracks were added.

More songs appeared in May 1972, again from TMOQ. This time two LPs, with the titles "OUTAKES 1" and "OUTAKES 2", contained the BBC versions of 21 commercially released songs, plus "Lucille" and "The Hippy Hippy Shake". This material was from Pop Go The Beatles and Saturday Club. The sound quality was comparable with that of the previous release. The records were on matrix BO-519 and BO-520, and the first pressing had coloured vinyl, a rubber-stamped cover with a pig sticker, and white labels with a black 1 and 2 for the sides, and two thin black rings around their border. The further issues, in part on black vinyl, featured the pig label; also a 2-LP set coupling the two single LPs was released. CBM copied the TMOQ records in 2 single LPs, titled "STUDIO SESSIONS VOL. 1" and "STUDIO SESSIONS VOL. 2". They were originally released in May 1973, with the title printed on the label, and subsequently repressed with various generic labels until 1976. In late 1979 or early 1980 the Japanese label Black Discs released these records on matrix ZAP-1061 / 1062. Twenty of these songs were joined together by Wizardo on a single album, titled "WORDS OF LOVE" in its first pressing released in August 1975 and subtitled "STUDIO OUTAKE RECORDINGS 1962-64" in the later issues (continuing the tradition of misleading titles). These issues were on matrix WRMB-326 and had noticeably worse sound quality. Another compilation featuring part of the songs included on the two "OUTAKES" LPs was produced by Wizardo in September 1976, entitled "THE LAST BEETLE RECORD" (matrix 393, black "World Records" label). Excerpts from the "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD" and "OUTAKES 1 & 2" LPs were spread over a great number of records distributed in the second half of the seventies and in the first half of the eighties. There is no use in listing them here. More material appeared in the early seventies; this did not usually fill a complete LP: one or a few tracks, at times a single programme, were added to other material. The first programme to appear was Top Of The Pops, the U.S. rebroadcast of Top Gear July 16, 1964. This was independently released by an anonymous label on the album titled "THE BEATLES LAST ALBUM" and by CBM on "THE NEVER RELEASED MARY JANE". The first one was released in (possibly) late 1971 or early 1972, matrix 01 971. It was copied in 1972 by White Cover Folks as "LIVE AT NASSAU", matrix 999, originally distributed with a yellow label. This album was repressed in 1973 and 1974 as "TOP OF THE POPS/LIVE IN GERMANY". The CBM record ("THE NEVER RELEASED MARY JANE"), with matrix 3585, was originally distributed in November 1972 with a purple slipsheet and label with printed title. The subsequent issues had generic labels and usually a blue printed insert. This session was also included on a record by Highway HiFi, a subsidiary of TMOQ-Smokin' Pig, titled "TOP OF THE POPS", matrix HHCER 111. This LP was first issued in mid-1974 with a slipsheet printed with "rainbow" effect and repressed a number of times until 1983. In the late seventies the programme Top Of The Pops was independently rereleased by two different manufacturers on 7" EPs. One of these versions, in excellent quality, was on matrix 45x45000/45001 and bore fake "Capitol" P-9431 labels; the other one, from Brown Cloud Records (a name for a Melvin Records issue), had worse sound. Some more BBC items resurfaced in 1973; the following records contained previously unreleased material. "HAVE YOU HEARD THE WORD", by CBM, featured 3 tracks which had been broadcast on the BBC programme "The Beatles Story", transmitted in 1972; it was distributed in February 1973 and its first pressing had a label with a printed title and a red insert; matrix is WEC-3624. This record, quite surprisingly in view of its low level of interesting material and low sound quality, had an astonishing number of repressings and copies, including one by Amazon Etcetera released in 1974 or early 1975. In late spring 1973 CBM distributed another album, titled "PEACE OF MIND", matrix WEC Rl-3670, which, among various material, also included a few songs taken from the BBC sessions, in low quality. Its first pressing had generic labels with side indications. In late 1974 this too was copied by Amazon Etcetera records. In June 1973 TMOQ released "MARY JANE", matrix MJ-543, featuring in good audio quality parts of the June 30, 1964 From Us To You programme plus excerpts from Top Of The Pops; it was distributed in purple cardboard with rubber-stamped title and square gold pig sticker, red vinyl, and a black label with silver pig. The reissues were subtitled "SPICY BEATLES SONGS"; in the late seventies and early eighties it also reappeared as "BUG CRUSHER 'LIVE' ", from the original stamper. More repressings of the MJ-543 stamper, usually distributed with the first titles, date back to the mid and late eighties. The June 30, 1964 session reappeared on the CBM release "SWEDEN 1963", matrix WEC 3795, produced in July 1973; it had deluxe labels with the title printed on them. Very little material appeared in 1974: on "RARE BEATLES" (also titled "HAPPY BIRTHDAY" on another insert), CBM TB5030, distributed in March 1974, four previously unreleased songs made their debut, unfortunately in poor quality and noticeably slow (among these, "Johnny B. Goode" can hardly be recognized!). This LP first appeared with blank labels and had a few repressings on various other CBM labels. The record "HAPPY BIRTHDAY" by Wizardo Records, WRMB 345, featured the BBC track of this song plus songs from other records, in part BBC numbers. "SOLDIER OF LOVE", released in summer 1974 with a yellow CBM "pirate" label, a back cover featuring a D'Anunzio drawing pasted over the CBM "cartoon" print, matrix TB-1022, features the first appearance on LP of "I'll Be On My Way", in quite poor quality (a very rare 7" single had already been released), together with a few other numbers, among which is of course the title track. The last album for a few years to contain BBC material, released in December 1974, was the rare "STOCKHOLM", an LP by CBM on its Instant Analysis yellow label. This featured tracks from the "Easy Beat" show of July 21, 1963, in dreadful quality.

No more "new" BBC songs appeared between 1975 and 1977, only compilations recycling previously released material appeared. New items suddenly flooded the market in 1978, when the important label "Ruthless Rhymes" was founded. "FROM US TO YOU - A PARLOPHONE REHEARSAL SESSION" is a 10" disc featuring the rehearsals for the fourth From Us To You programme. It was released in May 1978 on coloured vinyl, matrix LMW 28 IF, Ruthless Rhymes label, and was later copied on matrix 10 A/B. A new LP by the same label was distributed in June 1978, titled "YOUNGBLOOD". This included on side A 10 BBC cuts, some of which were previously unreleased, but unfortunately the performances were not included in their complete form. This record on matrix BVP-005-RE had a deluxe b&w printed cover, two versions of which exist. The first one, with the group on stage, and a second one, with the Beatles in the field. The original stamper had a few reissues, with various labels (blank, Hohrweite and Stereophonie); a different version was released by Gotham Records in the early eighties: this retained the original cover, but replaced part of the new BBC tracks with other BBC material (already known) or with some Decca numbers. It was on matrix BVP-005. The counterpart of "YOUNGBLOOD" was released in late 1978 by Odd Records as "DEC. 63". This album copies side B of the Ruthless Rhymes production (a Liverpool live show) and adds four tracks from Saturday Club of December 26, 1964, previously unreleased. Apart from the poor audio quality, however, these are affected by overdubbed "live audience" screams, which make them completely useless. "DEC. 63" was repressed in 1982 by Modern Jazz Records as "FIRST U.S. SHOW" (a very imprecise title, as the record does not contain anything from the USA...).

In 1980 a tape with songs in excellent quality reached the producers, and the result was a series of astonishing releases. The first on is a 7" EP titled "FOUR BY THE BEATLES", by Hohrweite Stereophonie, matrix L-1453. This features 4 tracks from the July 16, 1963 Pop Go The Beatles, including some chat. Although three of these were already known to collectors, the audio quality here is excellent. This single, released in April 1980, had many repressings with various sleeves and, subsequently, with "BBC Transcription Service" labels, and was also copied by Gear Records on 2 single 7" discs. These tracks reappeared on an LP by the same producer, "BROADCASTS", matrix L-2087 NR 771 x 100. This record included 18 BBC numbers in excellent quality, in part unreleased. It was distributed in July 1980 on green or black "BBC Transcription Service" labels, deluxe full colour cover (which was later used for a picture disc produced by another manufacturer). As expected, this LP had a series of reissues in the eighties, including one on coloured vinyl by Box Top Records, and was copied by other manufacturers. Even today it should be considered as one of the most interesting Beatles bootlegs. A further release distributed in July 1980 by the same producer under the POD Records label was "ROUGH NOTES". This is a miscellaneous LP, which features 4 BBC songs, three of which were unreleased at the time (from March 30, 1964 From Us To You) and the other one is "I'll Be On My Way" in better, although not particularly good, quality. Its matrix is L-2408-SR-73941, and it was released with 2 different b/w laminated covers.

More than a year after these issues, a very important new LP appeared on the market, "SILVER DAYS (AIR TIME)" contained, besides a perfect copy of the Sweden October 24, 1963 concert, many songs from the BBC sessions, in excellent quality. Some of these tracks had already been known for more than 10 years, but here they sound almost perfect. This album was distributed in October 1981, matrix L-7198-MX 4729; on the cover it was credited to "Johnny and the Moondogs" (one of the Beatles' earlier names). Its first pressing had a blank label, the back cover had a sticker with track listing, and the front cover had a sticker with "AIR TIME" (hence it's common title). More issues were on the Subway Records label (although the cover says Warwick Records), lacking stickers. A few months later, in January 1982, another very important LP, "BEAUTIFUL DREAMER", was released in the USA (all these records were produced by the same manufacturers, under different names). This is the first album to contain tracks from the very early BBC appearances, for example the title song; it's on matrix L-8346-DH-9501 and has a nice full colour jacket. Another producer released "WONDERFUL PICTURE OF YOU" in May 1982, matrix SKI-5430, Circle Records. This is a 2-LP set, which, to a copy of an older record featuring some "Get Back" material, was added some BBC sampler tapes. Very interesting, previously unreleased songs are included, among which are tracks taken from their very first Teenagers Turn programme. The weak point is that these cuts were only in fragments, badly edited and partly off-speed. However, sound quality for a few of them has not been equalled yet.

In early 1982 the BBC (after suggestions by a Beatle fan) decided to prepare a memorial programme to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the first Beatles BBC sessions. This was quite a difficult task, as only very few parts of the Beatles sessions had survived in the BBC archives. However, using these few programmes and some of the songs which had previously appeared on unofficial releases, the BBC could eventually manage a two-hour programme, which was aired on March 7, 1982. Needless to say, this show was immediately reproduced on a 2-LP set by "Radio Transcription Records", matrix CBB-20 released in June 1982. The BBC show was rearranged by American radio networks, with the addition of some tracks taken from the most recent LPs (in particular "BEAUTIFUL DREAMER" and "SILVER DAYS"). The programme, which was aired in U.S. between May 29 and 31, 1982, was used to produce a couple of LPs: "THE BEATLES BBC", by Dream Records, matrix L-9743-DR-36282 and "WITH LOVE FROM US TO YOU", by Oro Records, matrix L-10328-ORO-6365; both these LPs were released in July 1982. The second one also contained a poster, but, from a musical point of view, they obviously did not add anything new to our knowledge.

On December 27, 1982 BBC aired an expanded version of the Beatles special, with more songs chosen from among those left out in the first edition and included in the American ones, plus some of the material which was traded among collectors on tape (excerpts from the first BBC session of March 8, 1962, for example). This three-hour programme was rebroadcast in the U.S. in May 1983 and, as its preceding one, it was soon transcripted to unofficial records. The first one to appear was a 3-LP set titled "THE BEATLES AT THE BEEB" by (fake) London Wavelength Records, matrix AT THE BEEB A-H. It was released in July 1983 and was the direct transcription of the programme, including commercials. A slightly subsequent release by a different manufacturer was titled "THE BEATLES AT THE BEEB - THE STORY OF THEIR RADIO CAREER", again on (fake) London Wavelength Records labels. This had a better pressing and commercials were edited out; it was on matrix HOUR 1/2/3 and each record had a label of a different colour (red, green and blue). The original stampers were also used for a copy on picture disc, which was included in the 5-LP box "SO MUCH YOUNGER THEN", produced in 1985. A Japanese version, whose pressing is extremely good, is a 2-LP set, which did not include all the songs broadcast by the BBC and cut all the interviews and comments by the presenter of the show. This record is titled "BEATLES BROADCAST COLLECTION" and is on matrix BBC 1/2/3/4. At this point, collectors had a comparatively good representation of the BBC material available. Some compilations or copies of the aforementioned records started appearing, but all the sources were fragmentary. Even the BBC programmes failed to give comprehensive information, as obviously the producers of the memorials chose only the songs available in better quality of those of greater importance.

An essential addition to the collection of BBC tracks came in December 1984, with the release of "DIRECTLY FROM SANTA CLAUS, RARE UNRELEASED BEATLES TRACK", a now rare European picture disc which featured 18 songs as yet unreleased. All these songs were arranged in chronological order of original broadcast (except for a single mistaken attribution) and derived from some tapes which were traded at the time. Although sound quality was not always satisfying, this record gained an extraordinary importance for completists: until now, in fact, it contained tracks not available elsewhere on disc.

The most important series of Beatles BBC unofficial releases started in October 1986, when the first of 13 LPs with BBC sessions, titled "THE BEATLES AT THE BEEB - VOL. 1" to "VOL. 13", appeared. The tapes originating this series had long been preserved by a U.K. collector, who in the middle of the eighties traded them with some Dutch friends. The material was then given to a group of European producers who started the release of the records on the label "Beeb Transcription Records". The first 9 volumes were pressed in Europe, while the last four volumes, due to some problems which arose at the pressing plants, were produced in the USA at two different plants, one of which used noticeably worse vinyl. The absolute importance of this series is that it brings us an incredible amount of previously unreleased sessions, often including chats and announcements. Moreover, sound quality is in general very good, often excellent, and the liner notes (although excessively emphatic) give useful information. A few weak points however affected this production. First of all, some of the incomplete programmes could have been at least in part completed taking the available missing songs from already released sources. Some songs in poor quality could have been replaced with those available in better sound. Slight work with filters and equalizers on the original tapes could have increased the overall audio quality, which sometimes suffers from some hiss or is not equalized. Unfortunately, the tapes start from 1963, thus all the first BBC sessions are missing (and probably many of them are lost forever). The series ended with Vol. 13 in December 1988. These LPs were in part copied in the USA as 2-LP sets, and a few of them also had an issue on coloured vinyl. Starting from 1989, the complete series was transferred onto CD by the European producers Pyramid Records. All these CDs appeared with a stock sleeve saying "RADIOACTIVE", to which some US and European distributors added a reduced copy of the original LP covers. When it was clear that the "BEATLES AT THE BEEB" producers did not own the tapes of the first programmes, some European and U.S. manufacturers (not directly related to the "BEEB" producers) pressed a further record, which included these missing sessions. The first one to appear was "MEET THE BEEB", released in April 1988, on matrix 800, designed to look like number 0 of the "BEEB" series. It was a European record, of much worse sound quality than the tapes from which it was derived. Of course, all the material was unreleased at the time, so this record was nevertheless quite interesting.

An American attempt with a slightly more complete track listing was released in summer 1988. It was titled "THE BEATLES AT THE BEEB WITH PETE BEST", by Drexel Records, matrix L-31 1 23-BEEB 6263 (the lacquers of the "BEEB" volumes 10 and 11 were produced at the same plant). This time the tapes were of better quality, but the release is ruined by a very hissy and noisy pressing. The third attempt, and the worst of all, was released by Tiger Beat Records in December 1988 (this label also pressed the last two "BEEB" volumes). They included on "THE LOST BEEBS", matrix TBR LP-2, also tracks missing from the "BEEB" series: these were taken from "YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD", but sound was awfully distorted, worse than on the original 1971 record! With these releases, nearly all the surviving BBC sessions were published. The BBC itself acquired the "BEEB" series and produced a new 14-episode memorial series, including also a few other sessions which meanwhile had surfaced from their archives; this programme was broadcast in the U.K. from October 1 to December 31, 1988, and, in a somewhat different version, in the USA in the next year. Lots of compilations were derived from these releases of BBC programmes. Among these, the most interesting are the Swingin' Pig 3-LP/2-CD sets "FROM US TO YOU" and the Japanese 2-CD set "THE BEATLES ON BBC". In 1992 a 9-CD series appeared in Europe, claiming to be the complete BBC catalogue ("THE BBC BEATLES: COMPLETE CATALOGUE VOL. 1-9"). However, this was simply produced by adding "AT THE BEEB WITH PETE BEST" to the "Pyramid" CDs, and mastering the programmes according to the broadcast date; the tracks missing from the Pyramid CDs have not been added, and those incomplete or in poorer quality have not been replaced with the ones available in better sound.

The 9-CD set which we have produced should represent the definitive collection of the Beatles' BBC Sessions now available, chronologically arranged, and in the best sound quality. Enjoy listening to the Beatles at the Beeb and...

STAY TUNED!

THE BEATLES LIVE AT THE BBC - COMPILING THE 'LOST' TAPES

Down in the BBC vaults, we were told, they had stumbled upon golden tapes containing long lost recordings of the Beatles' radio performances. It was hailed as the greatest and most fortuitous discovery since the unearthing of Tutankhamun's tomb, but then RICHARD BUSKIN,intrepid reporter, got on the case and spoke to BBC Radio producer Kevin Howlett and Abbey Road Studios engineer, Peter Mew. The truth, he learned, differed somewhat from the hype.

Well, well, well, here we go again! What is it about publicity and press hacks that compels them, every timesome legendary, previously-unreleased material is unleashed on the general public, to summon up images of said tapes being discovered down in the vaults? For one thing, just how many record companies do, in fact, have these mysterious - and, no doubt, cobweb-infested - underground storage chambers; and secondly, are we to assume that there are regularly exploratory expeditions undertaken in order to seek out even more of this hidden treasure? You can just imagine the scene..... Indiana Jones, eat your heart out!

Indeed, in the case of the recently released Beatles radio sessions, we were informed by news reports on the BBC itself that the vaults in which
the tapes were actually 'dust-encrusted', which doesn't say too much for the work of the BBC archivists. Furthermore the tapes were miraculously
all found to be in pristine condition, and they contained songs which nobody could recall the Beatles ever performing. Well, to all this I will
say just one thing - and, being my usual diplomatic self, I will do so in a typically restrained manner - what a pile of tosh.

Of the 275 Beatles recordings broadcast by the BBC between March 8, 1962 and June 7, 1965, various were in fact re-broadcast by the network in a two hour special entitled The Beatles At The Beeb in 1982. A three hour version was subsequently syndicated in other countries, and in 1988, there was a series of 14 half hour shows entitled The Beeb's Lost Beatles Tapes. What is more, the fans have had bootleg recordings of many of these sessions since the early 1970's. during the past year, an Italian company has even put out a nine CD boxed set containing every single number the band committed to tape in the BBC studios. The only reason for the delay was the protracted legal wrangling between the BBC, EMI Records (to whom the Beatles were contracted from 1962 onwards), and the group's own company Apple Corp. So let's not talk about the mass rediscovery of long lost masters.

DISCOVERING THE TOMB

Kevin Howlett, a senior producer at BBC Radio 1, wrote the sleeve notes for the new album, The Beatles, Live At The BBC, having previously
re-engineered - and acted as a conduit in the location of - much of the material that was used for the 1982 and 1988 re-broadcasts.

"At the press launch for the album, the first question I was asked was whether it was like discovering Tutankhamen's tomb," he says. "So I
replied that the material was very exciting and that I therefore suppose you could use that analogy if you want to. That was a mistake, however,
because the reporter then quoted me as asserting, 'it was like discovering Tutankhamun's tomb!' I should have been wise to his little ploy, because in truth I feel that the material is much more a time capsule that enables you to travel back and rediscover where BBC Radio was at in the mid 1960's.

Such is the case for Howlett himself whose own time at the beeb commenced quite a few years later. "I was just a child listening at home to this stuff - a beatle baby," he says. Nevertheless, while researching the sessions he did talk to numerous people who had worked on them, and
from what they said, he deduced that, during the early to mid 60's, there had actually been a conscious decision among the BBc hierarchy to
dispose of all the material.

"I spoke to Jeff Griffin who was here at the BBC, and he recalled a particular Head Of Department saying, 'This material is taking up too much
room. we've got to get rid of it!' Today that may seem ludicrous, especially as Radio 1 has its own archive and we hang on to all our
sessions. In fairness, there was so much live recording done in those days - because there weren't all that many records being played - that if they had kept absolutely everything, it would have got completely out of control. I mean. you didn't really need to keep the Northern Dance
Orchestra performing Singing The Blues for the fifteenth time or whatever.

"On the other hand, The Beatles had certainly become a phenomenon within a very short space of time, and so you would have though that somebody would have though that somebody would have considered the recordings worth hanging onto for posterity. There again, I've also heard that the contracts made with performing artists back then contained a clause stating that session tapes should be destroyed after three months; possibly a Musicians Union rule that its members would then be required to return and make further recordings.

Nevertheless in spite of all the rules and regulations, some employees fortunately did have the foresight todisregard them, albeit that the task
of tracking down and collating these remnants was anything but straightforward for Howlett and his colleagues. The beeb, you see, is a large corporate body with numerous arms that reach out to both the domestic and overseas markets, and as a result, it has several different archives in a variety of locations.

BACK TO THE ARCHIVE

"Over the years, it's been a process of putting the Beatles archive back together really, as more and more stuff has come to light," says Howlett.
"For the series The Beeb's Lost Beatles Tapes, which included a lot of speech interviews from the timew as well as the tracks, we turned up quite a few things. One of the most exciting finds came from the BBC Transcription Department, which was originally set up to distribute
programmes to far flung corners of the British Empire."

During the 1960's, there was a radio show called Top Of The Pops - not to be confused with the television programme of the same name - hosted by Brian Matthew. This fitted onto two sides of a long playing disc and it featured Matthew presenting session tracks that had been recorded for various BBC programmes by groups such as the Hollie, The Swinging Blue Jeans.... and The Beatles.

"The transcription discs were utilised as the source for some of the 1964 material on the Live At The BBC album," explains Howlett. "On 'Things
We Said Today', for instance, you can hear Brian Matthew voicing-over some sort of introduction, and that's actually taken from a Top Of The Pops disc, because the original version without the voice-over doesn't exist.

"There can be no doubt that the shows were well recorded at the time. So it's just a question as to how well the material has lasted over the years and in what form. I can remeber George Martin (the album's Executive Producer) saying to me that a disc is quite a good storage medium and that he was quite happy to master from it. In fact when I was working on a series called Paul Simon's Songbook a few years ago I talked to (producer) Roy Halee about his re-mastering of the Simon and Garfunkel material and how the original master tapes were in a bad condition, having been played over and over again and not looked after. he was appalled at the state they were in, and said, 'if only they could find me a decent mintcopy of 'Bridge Over Troubled Water', at least I would be able to master from that!"

So much for disc storage, yet within the BBC Transcription Department there is also a tape library, and it is here that the most exciting find was made for the 1988 series The Beeb's Lost Beatles Tapes. "We came across two ten-inch reels with 'The Beatles' on the spine," recalls
Howlett. "One of these was a half-hour reel featuring them larking around for the '65 Christmas Show, (an edition of Saturday Club on which the
group did not perform any songs). They were being interviewed by Brian Matthew and doing a send up of (the then influential TV pop show) Juke Box Jury, and obviously another version was eventually edited down from this.

"At the same time, the other half-hour reel was similar in that it had been left running while the session was in process, but it also included
them performing 'I Feel Fine' and 'She's A Woman'. It had false starts, takes which broke down half-way through, and talkback between the group and the control room. It was fascinating, and that was quite a find, because it's sort of a pre-master really. From it, a master would have
been made - a track would have been dubbed down, edited or whatever".

It's wierd how some things turn up. For instance, I've done a programme about the Rolling Stones' work at the Beeb. Some of their sessions are
still missing, but one of those that is still around is probably the most interseting of all. In 1964, they performed tracks in front of a live audience that they never recorded for Decca. it was an experimantel stereo broadcast for the BBC, whereby they would broadcast one side of the stereo
on the radio and the other side on the television (ie. stereophony). Then there were no television programmes in the early morning, and so they
broadcast one side of the stereo on TV only and you would have to position your radio and your TV to get the stereo image! Now, that tape survived because it was of interest technically. You know, some engineer kept it because it was one of the first stereo broadcasts and not particularly because it featured the Rolling Stones".

ALTERNATIVE SOURCES

Meanwhile, with regard to The Beatles' radio performances, contact with the original session producers yielded some more tapes, but there were still quite a few gaps to be filled. It was for this reason that contact also had to be made with some.... ahem, 'alternative sources'. Indeed,
since the transmission of the 1988 series, the most recent and valuable discovery has been a recording that a member of the public made off his radio back on January 26, 1963. Now it should be pointed out that this kind of practice was, of course, highly illegal, but in the case of The
Beatles sessions, the BBC have had to behavein a manner which could more aptly be described as bloody grateful rather than terribly annoyed, for it is thanks to some eager listeners - and not the hallowed vaults - that certain lost gems have been retreived.

"The 1988 radio series was virtually completed just before it went out on the air", says Howlett, "but then when it did go out, some people
phoned up and said that they has more tapes. Out of all of them one appeared to actually have some stuff that we didn't have, recorded all
those years ago on his little Grundig. While it was too late for the series, I nevertheless kept his letter on file and got back in touch with
him when this album project was imminent. he journeyed down to London with his five-inch reels, we went through them, and that's how 'Keep Your Hands Off My Baby' appeared on the album".

Certainly, a good number of shows were originally broadcast by the BBC in what was then known as VHF, and so, if someone had a half-decent
domestic tape recorder and took a direct feed from his radio, the result of his or her endeavours could well be usable, especially with the digital
technology now available to clean up such recordings. Peter Mew has been utilising the SonicSolutions computer enhancement system for the past 5 years at Abbey Road. He first became involved in the Beatles project when work on the album started in earnest around the middle of 1992.

SONIC ENHANCEMENT

"After George Martin had chosen the tracks that would go on the record, they were passed over to me for de-noising, EQing, and all the rest of
it," he says. "Over the peiod of two and a half years, the album went through various changes - running order changes, title changes and things
like that. At each stage I had to re-edit and make adjustments, so that it still sounded OK. In fact, overall it must have gone through seven
different versions, and so I can now sing almost every song off by heart!

The masters that the BBC had were in pretty reasonable shape, and they therefore needed much the same treatment that old studio tapes would need. From there, however, things went down the scale in terms of sound quality and some items required a lot more work. Coming from so many different sources, each track had its own problems, and so it wasn't like a normal studio job where you had a number of studio reductions which basically required noise reduction. Everything had to be approached as a separate entity, and then, having done that, it was a matter of trying to get continuity of sound, and that worked in some cases and probably not in others!"

Undoubtedly, the greatest attraction of the 56 song Live At The BBC album is the 30 numbers which the band never recorded; mostly old
rock'n'roll covers from thier Hamburg and Cavern Club days, as well as a few contemporary hits and even one of their own compositions, 'I'll Be On My Way', which was a hit for Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas. Again, as with Little Eva's 'Keep Your Hands Off My Baby', several of these
performances returned the BBC's way courtesy of private recordings, yet in a good number of cases they also came from the Transcription Library at Kensington House, but from Bush House, where the World Service programmes are broadcast.

"The show, Pop Go The Beatles, was broadcast in the summer of 1963 on the domestic service," explains Kevin Howlett. "It featured a guest group and and a presenter and The Beatles reading requests, but it was then re-made for the BBC World Service and put out in '64 featuring just the songs and an announcer, and so that material went over to Bush House. Now, somebody over there made a tape of the more unusual songs, and due to this I was able to get hold of some of the most interesting tracks".

Still, there are half a dozen Beatles performances of 'unreleased' numbers which George Martin deemed as unsuitable for the album: Roy
Orbisin's 'Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)', from their very first radio broadcast on March 8, 1962 (featuring Pete Best on drums); The
Coasters' arrangement of 'Besame Mucho' and Joe Brown's 'A Picture Of You', both from June 15, 1962 (still with Best on drums); Slim Whitman's 'Beautiful Dreamer' from January 26, 1963; Chuck Berry's 'I'm Talking About You' from March 16, 1963; and Carl Perkins' 'Lend Me your Comb' from the broadcat of July 16, 1963.

Of these, the first five are audibly much too poor to bring up to scratch for the album - listeners' recordings that were evidently not made
via direct feed into a good quality grundig, but rather with a cheap microphone placed next to the radio speaker while Mum was told to be
quiet. In other words, items of historic importance that are not quite fit for general public consumption. yet the reason for omitting 'Lend Me Your
Comb', which originates from the BBC's Bush House archive, is altogether less obvious.

Officially George Martin's selection criteria for the material involved both technical quality and the standard of the performance, and on the
latter count the number just missed the mark. Unofficially, the powers that be may also wish to keep something in the can, and thus have somthing in reserve to use as a 'bonus track' enticement for some future release along with all of the alternate takes.

DROPOUTS AND MAGIC WANDS

"The Roling Stones only did about 12 sessions, and so the fact that The Beatles did 52 is absolutely phenomenal", says Kevin Howlett. "They really worked at it, and of course, they were playing live in the studio, although by '64 they did get a bit more sophisticated. They certainly
didn't have a multitrack machine at their disposal. The first multitrack to come into the BBC was an eight-track, and that was a very long time
after The Beatles had stopped doing sessions here. So, the only way that they could overdub was to put down a backing track and then play the tape back through the mixing desk and perform over the top of it. You can occasionally hear examples of this on some of their '64 recordings.

30 years later one of the problems which peter mew had to deal with, especially when working on some of the rarer recordings, was that of sound dropouts. For, whilst he was able to repair most of them, a close listen to the album indicates that there were still a few instances wher this was just not possible.

"The art, if you like, of using computer editing systems these days is that they allow you to take very small slithers of sound from elsewhere
and patch them in, much like you would with a painting," mew explains. "But if you can't find a matching piece of sound from somewhere else in
the song, then you just can't do it, because you obviously don't want to apply any new paint!

On 'A Taste Of Honey', for instance, there's an analogue dropout that has bugged me from the word go, but I couldn't do anything about it,
because that piece of sound wasn't repeated anywhere else in the song. I also couldn't boost it, because it's not a particular level that drops for
a particular length of time; it might drop a little bit here and then go up and down, and it's too long to restore using the click removal devices,
which work on several milliseconds of sound. This dropout lasts for perhaps half a second and so you can't use the computer.

So, at the end of the day, contrary to what some people think, the Sonic Solutions system is not a magic wand. It's a piece of technology, and if
you've got absolute garbage going in, then you'll have something better than absolute garbage coming out, but it ain't going to be perfect".

Anyway, in the case of The Beatles, Live At The BBC album, who really cares? This is vintage stuff and it serves to remind one that, in the
final analysis, musical content is of far more importance to the average listener than sheer sonic quality.

SPOTTING TALENT

Brian Willey produced the December 4, 1962 and January 29, 1963 editions of The Talent Spot on which the Beatles first performed before a live audience. The first of these, recorded on November 27, 1962 at the BBC's Paris Theatre in Central London, featured the soon-to-be fab Four at the bottom of a star spangled bill comprising The Ted Taylor Four, Mark Tracey, Elkie Brooks, and Frank Kelly. Still, it served as a showcase for new talent and broke the mould in as much as no audition was required. In effect, therefore, it was like a broadcast audition.

Willey now recalls that after the first show, Brian Epstein, the Beatles' manager, "asked me, 'Do you like them?' and I said 'Well, they're
rough, but they entertain me.' Bearing in mind that it was a live broadcast, a one-take job, they didn't do too badly. Epstein then asked me
if I would have them back on the show. I said 'Yes', and by the time that happened, a few weeks later, they had already climbed the charts, and in
fact, made a hell of a difference to my audience. This usually consisted of about 30 or 40 people, and now, suddenly, hundreds were packing the
Paris and queueing outside on the street".

Full-scale Beatlemania was looming just ahead and the band's phenomenal rise to superstardom was underway. Yet it is only with hindsight that
those who were involved in this story can fully appreciate the significance of what they took part in all those years ago. "Looking back
they were great days", says Brian Willey, "but at the time, I was just doing a job, and I'm sure that none of us ever thought we were making a
mark on history.

Oh well, back to the vaults...




March 7th, 1962
TEENAGERS TURN (HERE WE GO)
The Playhouse Theatre, St. John's Road, Manchester



RECORDED: 07 March, 1962, 8:00 - 8:45 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 08 March, 1962, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Ray Peters
PRODUCER: Peter Pilbeam

1. MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE BBC.01.01
2. DREAM BABY BBC.01.02
3. PLEASE MR. POSTMAN BBC.01.03

Here We Go was a programme recorded before a live audience, and the Beatles took part in five shows. This is an absolutely essential session: their first radio broadcast, the first live show which has been preserved, the only Beatles recording of "Dream Baby", and the only live perfomances of "Memphis" and "Please Mr. Postman". Also, it is one of the very few available shows with Pete Best on drums.

The group's successful February 12 audition for the show's producer, Peter Pilbeam, consisted of two Lennon-McCartney songs, "Hello Little Girl" and "Like Dreamers Do", along with "Till There Was You" and "Memphis". Of these, only the last song was played again for their first broadcast.

THE SONGS

1. "Hello Little Girl" is a well-known Lennon-McCartney composition, which was played during their Decca audition on January 1, 1962. It is really a pity that it has not been transmitted, as we do not have other performances of this song (other than a 1969 tape).

2. "Memphis, Tennessee" was first released by Chuck Berry in July 1959 and had plenty of cover versions. The Beatles performed it during the Decca audience and five times at the BBC but never released it officially. All these versions closely match Chuck Berry's original recording. Lead vocalist: John

3. "Dream Baby". The original version had been released by Roy Orbison only one month before and was doing very well in the American charts. Paul takes the lead in this Beatles cover (which however cannot compete with Orbison's original take!).

4. "Please Mr. Postman". It was first recorded by the American group The Marvelettes in 1961. The version from this show is quite interesting for two reasons: it precedes its official release by one year, and it is the only live version (the other two BBC appearances were taped in the studio in 1963 and 1964). The Beatles' arrangement is already almost identical to the released one, however, it is more rock 'n' roll than the original record. Lead vocalist: John.

THE SOUND

Purple Chick's previously unbooted tape (and the releases that copied it) sounds much better than other releases.
June 11th 1962
HERE WE GO
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

RECORDED: 11 June, 1962, 8:45 - 9:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 15 June, 1962, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Ray Peters
PRODUCER: Peter Pilbeam

1. 1. LOVE ME DO
2. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.03.02
3. P.S. I LOVE YOU
4. SHEILA (not broadcast)

The last available recording with Pete Best on drums.

THE SONGS

1. "Ask Me Why". This live version predates the Star Club one by six months and the officially released version by seven. It is the first available version, although very similar to later ones. Played 4 times at the BBC.

2. "Besame Mucho". One of the Beatles' favourite "classic" songs. They performed it in their live act during 1961-62, they played it at their Decca audition and their initial Parlophone session (with Pete Best), and it was revived in 1969 and is shown in the film "Let It Be" , although this is the only BBC rendition. The Beatles' version is probably derived from the Coaster cover which had good success in 1960. Lead vocalist: Paul.

3. "A Picture Of You". The only Beatles recording of this song, which was a hit by Joe Brown and the Bruvvers and had just entered the charts. George's first lead vocal at the BBC.

THE SOUND

Purple Chick's previously unbooted tape (and the releases that copied it) sounds much better than other releases.
October 25th, 1962
HERE WE GO
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

RECORDED: 25 October, 1962, 8:00 - 8:45 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 26 October, 1962, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Ray Peters
PRODUCER: Peter Pilbeam

1. 1. LOVE ME DO
2. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.03.02
3. P.S. I LOVE YOU
4. SHEILA (not broadcast)

Broadcast 26 October 1962 on "Here We Go". This recording has often been identified as coming from the TV show "People And Places", but I disagree due to the audience noise and electric guitars which clash with Lewisohn's description of that TV appearance (no audience, and acoustics).

This show was taped before a live audience. It was Ringo's first BBC session and the only live appearance of "P.S. I Love You". "A Taste Of Honey" predates its official release by a few months. During this session the Beatles also played their unique BBC version of "Sheila", which unfortunately was not aired. A Beatles cover of this song is available on the Hamburg Star Club record.

THE SOUND

The Artifacts tape is a little longer at the end, so it has been edited onto Yellow Dog's ever-so-slightly better quality version.

December 4th, 1963
THE TALENT SPOT
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

RECORDED: 27 November, 1962, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 04 December,1962, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Gary Marshal
PRODUCER: Brian Willey

1. LOVE ME DO
2. P.S. I LOVE YOU
3. TWIST AND SHOUT
Not currently available. Here the Beatles were
promoting their first single release. "Twist And Shout" appears
for the first of its 9 BBC performances and predates its
commercial release by four months.

January 16th, 1963
HERE WE GO
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

RECORDED: 16 January, 1963, 8:00 - 8:45 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 25 January, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Ray Peters
PRODUCER: Peter Pilbeam

1. CHAINS BBC.05.01
2. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.05.02
3. ASK ME WHY BBC.05.03
4. THREE COOL CATS (not broadcast)

A recently rediscovered program. This show presented the first BBC appearance of "Chains" (perfomed three more times.) "Three Cool Cats"
unfortunately was not broadcast. The Beatles were obviously promoting their single "Please Please Me"/"Ask Me Why" which had just been released.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog was the first release of this long-circulating show.

January 22nd, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, Northumberland Avenue, London WC2

RECORDED: 22 January, 1963, 4:00 - 5:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 26 January, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Jimmy Grant

1. SOME OTHER GUY BBC.06.01
2. LOVE ME DO BBC.06.02
3. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.06.03
4. KEEP YOUR HANDS OFF MY BABY BBC.06.04
5. BEAUTIFUL DREAMER BBC.06.05

The first of ten appearances on Saturday Club. This programme was set up in 1958, offering a mix of pop, jazz,country, and rock. Being the only chance to hear this kind of music on the BBC, it soon gained great popularity in Great Britain and was an essential promotional medium for any artist. The Beatles took this opportunity to present their brand-new single, "Please Please Me", together with their first one.

Only fragments of 'Please Please Me' are currently available - but the whole song exists and hopefully will surface shortly.

THE SONGS:


1. "Some Other Guy".
This song was recorded by Ritchie Barrett in May 1962 and quickly became a favourite of many groups. A very famous Beatles live version was filmed at the Cavern Club on August 22, 1962. The group presented this song at the BBC three times. Lead vocalist: John.

4. "Keep Your Hands Off My Baby".
This Goffin-King song was released in 1962 by Little Eva, and this is the only Beatles version known to exist. Lead vocalist: John.


5. "Beautiful Dreamer". An old song written in the second half of the nineteenth century by Stephen Foster, which had other versions by Bing Crosby and Al Jolson. It became very famous in the fifties, and the Beatles probably learned their rock 'n' roll arrangement during their time in Hamburg. It was recorded there by fellow Liverpudlians, the Searchers, who released their version later in 1963. It is the Beatles' only known recorded performance. Lead vocalist: Paul.

THE SOUND

We stuck with the original Purple Chick presentation of this show - using our previously unbooted upgrade along with BBC Trailer's "Love Me Do". Then we added a few previously unheard fragments of Please Please Me, taken from the full song which exists (alas, the rest of the show apparently does not survive in this quality)


January 29th, 1963
THE TALENT SPOT
BBC Paris Theatre, London

RECORDED: 22 January, 1963, 8:45 - 9:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 29 January, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Gary Marshal
PRODUCER: Brian Willey

1. PLEASE PLEASE ME
2. ASK ME WHY BBC.07.02
3. SOME OTHER GUY

A recently rediscovered song.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog was the first release of this long-circulating show.


February 20th, 1963
PARADE OF THE POPS
The Playhouse Theatre, London



TRANSMITTED. live: 20 February, 1963, 12:31 - 1:30 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Denny Piercy
PRODUCER: John Kingdon

1. LOVE ME DO
2. PLEASE PLEASE ME

Not currently available. A live show (the Beatles' first for the BBC) where the group was promoting their records


March 6th, 1963
HERE WE GO
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

RECORDED: 06 March, 1963, 8:00 - 8:45 p.m
TRANSMITTED: 12 March, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER:Ray Peters
PRODUCER: Peter Pilbeam

1. MISERY BBC.09.01
2. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET BBC.09.02
3. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.09.03
4. I SAW HER STANDING THERE (not broadcast)

The Beatles' last appearance on Here We Go. This show features the only live performance of track 2.

THE SOUND

We used Yellow Dog's version, which is probably just a different eq of Great Dane's tape.

Here We Go was normally broadcast on Fridays, but for some reason this show was broadcast on a Tuesday. This was the Beatles' fifth and final appearance on the show, but host Ray Peters incorrectly refers to it as their fourth. Brian Epstein later cancelled three appearances scheduled for June and July. The series was originally titled Teenagers Turn: Here We Go and was the show on which the Beatles made their radio debut in March 1962.

The Beatles also recorded I Saw Her Standing There for this particular show, but it was edited from the final broadcast. This was the first time that the public got to hear Do You Want To Know A Secret and Misery as the Beatles' debut LP wouldn't be released until 22 March - on the same day that Kenny Lynch released Misery. His was the first cover version, while Billy J. Kramer & the Dakotas' version of Do You Want To Know A Secret would be released in April.

This show was recorded three days before the beginning of their U.K. tour, opening for Tommy Roe and Chris Montez. The single version of Please Please Me had just topped the New Musical Express chart, hence the reference in Ray Peters' introduction, although this wasn't the chart which the BBC normally used.

Here We Go's house band was the Northern Dance Orchestra, aka the NDO, one of several bands employed by the BBC to fulfil a long-held agreement with the Musicians Union. Bands like the NDO, the Midlands Dance Orchestra, etc., were Musicians Union members and had to be employed to fulfil the BBC commitment to "live" music. It was because of this agreement that bands like the Beatles were booked to play live. A certain amount of "live" music time had to be alloted to counter the then-growing amount of time given over to the playing of records, so-called "needle time" in radio parlance. Hence, some shows like Here We Go, Pop Go The Beatles, and others were entirely live with no records played, while Saturday Club and Top Gear were a mixture of records and pre-recorded live sessions. Radio Luxembourg and the pirate stations (which appeared in 1964) had no such agreement with the Musicians Union and just played records.

The Trad Lads may have been another Musicians Union member band, specially formed for the purposes of radio work on the BBC. However, a group called the Trad Grads recorded for Decca in 1963. Ben Richmond recorded two songs for Pye's Piccadilly label in 1963. Warmed Over Kisses was not one of them.

About the survival of this particular tape

This show survives only because one of the evening's performers taped it directly off of FM radio onto a domestic tape recorder (which explains the superb sound quality). The 13'46" worth of Here We Go featuring the Beatles' three songs was buried in the middle of nearly three hours' worth of recordings of children playing, a few other minor off-air recordings, and the like. The original tape - believed to be in the possession of the original taper - is complete as reproduced here, but it is shedding oxide and was poorly spooled. Additionally, it was recorded as four mono tracks to get the maximum recording time, so it is impossible to play back on most conventional domestic open-reel decks.

The tape was salvaged by a recording expert in the UK, who transferred it onto analogue cassette while performing some minor tweaking. All that was done after this transfer was to feed the recording through No-Noise and Sonic Solutions to eliminate the prominent hiss, while a touch of boost was added to the drums. Unlike most Beatles' BBC sessions, this recording comes directly off an original open-reel copy, via a single generation of professionally recorded cassette without Dolby noise reduction. As such, you are hearing a fourth-generation-from-source recording (two analogic and two digital generations), which is closer to source than most commercial recordings. Any minor drop-outs are due to the age of the original open-reel tape; however, whenever possible these were edited.

This recording came to light just after the release of Great Dane's 9CD box set, in the Spring of 1994, and was donated to Great Dane to help complete the saga of the Beatles at the BBC.

Great Dane Records is proud to offer this exceptional tape to all Beatles fans and collectors, and also wishes to express sincere thanks to the owner of the original tape for having made this possible. Enjoy and ... stay tuned!!!
March 16th, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB
Studio 3A, Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London W1

TRANSMITTED live: 16 March,1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.10.01
2. MISERY BBC.10.02
3. TOO MUCH MONKEY BUSINESS BBC.10.03
4. I'M TALKING ABOUT YOU BBC.10.04
5. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.10.05
6. THE HIPPY HIPPY SHAKE BBC.10.06

This show was broadcast live, a rarity for Saturday Club, because one of the Beatles had a severe cold the day the recording was scheduled. Although it predates the release of their first LP by just one week , the group only played three cuts from it, the remaining songs being rock classics.

THE SONGS

3. "Too Much Monkey Business". A Chuck Berry number originally released in 1956. The Beatles presented it four times on the BBC, always in a powerful arrangement. Lead vocalist: John.

4. "I'm Talking About You". The only BBC recording of another Berry song, originally released in 1961; also played by the Beatles in Hamburg. Lead vocalist: John.

6. "The Hippy Hippy Shake". Originally released by Chan Romero in 1959, it soon became a Beatles favourite: it was taped in Hamburg and played 5 times during the BBC shows. Lead vocalist: Paul.

THE SOUND

Here's a dilemma. Purple Chick's unbooted tape sounds significantly better, but there's significant interference here and there. Yellow Dog's tape sounds a little worse but has no interference. We tried editing them together, but that just wasn't working. So most of this show comes from Yellow Dog. We edited on the very beginning of "I Saw Her Standing There" from Purple Chick's tape as it was missing from Yellow Dog's. Also, we chose the Deflating The Mythology version of "I'm Talking About You" and added an unbooted tape to top and tail the ends.


March 28th, 1963
ON THE SCENE
Number 1 Studio, BBC Piccadilly Theatre, Denman Street, London W1

TRANSMITTED live: 16 March,1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews


1. MISERY
3. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET
5. PLEASE PLEASE ME

A typical short (and currently unavailable) appearance to promote their records.


April 3rd, 1963
EASY BEAT
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 03 April, 1963, 8:30 - 9:45 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 07 April, 1963, 10:31 - 11:30 a.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Ron Belchier

1. PLEASE PLEASE ME
2. MISERY
3. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.12.03

Only track 3 is available, although it is possible that also the other two numbers are in the hands of some Beatles collectors. It was taped in front of a live audience, thus it features the only live appearance of "Misery".

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog's tape is a tremendous improvement on previous releases.


April 18th, 1963
SWINGIN' SOUND
The Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Gore, London SW7

TX. live: 18 April, 1963, 9:10 - 10:15 p.m.
ANNOUNCERS: George Melly & Rolf Harris
PRODUCERS: Terry Henebery & Ron Belchier

1. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.13.01
2. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.13.02

The group's only appearance in the live concerts from the Royal Albert Hall broadcast by the BBC in 1963.

THE SOUND

Although Yellow Dog's tape is much better than before, the very beginning is missing, so we edited that in from Great Dane.


April 22, 1963
SIDE BY SIDE
Number 1 Studio, BBC Piccadilly Theatre, London

REC.: 01 April, 1963, 2:30 - 6:30 p.m.
TX.: 22 April, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: John Dunn
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. SIDE BY SIDE
2. I SAW HER STANDING THERE
3. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET
4. BABY IT'S YOU
5. PLEASE PLEASE ME
6. FROM ME TO YOU
7. MISERY

The first appearance on Side By Side, where the Fab Four only promoted tracks from their first releases. Currently not available. See also the notes for the second show (listed next), which was recorded the same day.


April 1st, 1963
SIDE BY SIDE
Number 1 Studio, BBC Piccadilly Theatre, London

RECORDED: 01 April, 1963, 6:30 - 10:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 13 May, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: John Dunn
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. SIDE BY SIDE BBC.15.01
2. FROM ME TO YOU
3. LONG TALL SALLY BBC.15.03
4. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.15.04
5. CHAINS BBC.15.05
6. THANK YOU GIRL BBC.15.06
7. BOYS BBC.15.07


The title track was played by the Karl Denver Trio, with John and Paul adding their vocals to Karl Denver's. The backing track was used for all three of the Beatles' appearances, with a different voice-over by John Dunn. All the songs here included, with the exclusion of "Long Tall Sally", had already been released. These versions are played in arrangements nearly identical to the released ones.

THE SONGS

3. "Long Tall Sally". This version predates the official version, which was recorded in February 1964, by nearly one year. It is quite interesting as its arrangement is clearly distinct from the released one, particularly in the rockabilly guitar solos. Lead vocalist: Paul.

5. "Chains". Released in late 1962 by the American group The Cookies, it was clearly one of the Beatles favourites. They not only included it on their first LP but also performed it four times at the BBC, starting with Here We Go, January 25, 1963. 'From Me To You' is currently unavailable.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog's tape is a little better, except for their glitch in "Long Tall Sally". We fixed that using Great Dane.


May 21st, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB + STEPPIN' OUT
The Playhouse Theatre, London

SATURDAY CLUB

RECORDED: 21 May, 1963, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 25 May, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.16.01
2. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET BBC.16.02
3. BOYS BBC.16.03
4. LONG TALL SALLY BBC.16.04
5. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.16.05
6. MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) BBC.16.06

Their third Saturday Club appearance features songs from their first LP, plus two tracks, "Long Tall Sally" and "Money (That's What I Want)", which appeared on a Beatles disc only in November 1963.

THE SONGS

6. "Money (That's What I Want)". The first hit for Motown, by Barrett Strong in 1960, and one of the classic numbers in the Beatles' repertoire. They played it often (including the Decca session), and it was released on their second LP in November 1963. There are 6 BBC takes, four of which predated the commercial release. These versions differ from the one taped at the EMI studio which included a piano intro. Lead vocalist: John.

THE SOUND

You may disagree, but Great Dane gets my vote for this show, just edging out Yellow Dog. It's a pretty subjective call though.

STEPPIN' OUT

RECORDED: 21 May, 1963, 10:00 - 11:15 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 03 June, 1963,10:31 - 11.30 a.m.
ANNOUNCER: Diz Disley
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery

1. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.17.01
2. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.17.02
3. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN
4. THANK YOU GIRL
5. FROM ME TO YOU
6. TWIST AND SHOUT

Only the first two tracks seem to have been preserved, in comparatively inferior quality. This is the first BBC performance of Chuck Berry's "Roll Over Beethoven" and predates its official release on the Beatles' 2nd LP by about 5 months

THE SOUND

It was never going to be much improvement, but for what it's worth, we used Yellow Dog.


May 24th, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 1
Number 2 Studio, BBC Aeolian Hall, 135-137 New Bond Street, London W1

RECORDED: 24 May, 1963, 2:00 -6:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 04 June, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Lee Peters
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: The Lorne Gibson Trio

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. FROM ME TO YOU
3. EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY
4. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET
5. YOU REALLY GOT A HOLD ON ME
6. MISERY
7. THE HIPPY HIPPY SHAKE
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

The first appearance on the most important series of radio shows for the Beatles' career. A trial of four programmes had been scheduled first, but it proved so popular that the series counted eleven more transmissions. It should be kept in mind that when Pop Go The Beatles started, the Beatles had scored only two number one records, and one year before they were virtually unknown outside of Liverpool: the BBC decision was an extremely progressive one. The Beatles enjoyed this programme and had fun joking with the announcers, reading fans' cards, and introducing their songs. What's more interesting is that the group, more than on other programmes, used to play a great number of rock and pop classics, which they never commercially released on record. The title track of the programme was a new arrangement of the nursery rhyme "Pop Goes The Weasel". Although from the first show only "The Hippy Hippy Shake" did not make it onto disc, two more songs were still unreleased in June 1963: "Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby" and "You Really Got A Hold On Me".

THE SONGS

3. "Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby" was by Carl Perkins and was on his self-titled 1959 UK LP.The Beatles included it in their repertoire years before releasing it in November 1964, and indeed this BBC version closely matches the released one. They performed it 5 times at the BBC, twice before the official release, twice to promote their "Beatles For Sale" LP, and the last time during their last appearance in 1965. Lead vocalist: George.

5. "You Really Got A Hold On Me". Another American classic, written by Smokey Robinson for the Miracles. It was performed four times on the BBC before its release on the Beatles' second album. Lead vocalist: John.

THE SOUND

Not only does Yellow Dog sound better (except for the glitch in the PGTB theme, which we fixed with BBC Trailer) it also includes a new introduction.


June 1st, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 3 + POP GO THE BEATLES 2
BBC Paris Theatre, London


PGTB #3

RECORDED: 01 June, 1963, 9:30 a.m - 1:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 18 June, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m
ANNOUNCER: Lee Peters
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: Carter Lewis and the Southerners

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. A SHOT OF RHYTHM AND BLUES BBC.18.01
3. MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE BBC.18.02
4. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.18.03
5. SURE TO FALL (IN LOVE WITH YOU) BBC.18.04
6. MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) BBC.18.05
7. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.18.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

Considering that track 6 was still unreleased in June 1963, we have 4 "new" performances here, 3 of which never made it onto disc. Track 3 is complete and in the best possible quality.

THE SONGS

2. "A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues". The original version had been released in March 1962 by Arthur Alexander as the flip side of another R & B standard, "You Better Move On". It soon became very famous, with many covers. They performed it twice more for the BBC. They apparently learned it in Hamburg since John wrote from there in April 1962 to his then-girlfriend Cynthia Powell to "send me the words of 'A Shot of Rhythm + Blues' please? There's not many." Lead vocal: John.

5. "Sure To Fall (In Love With You)". Another Carl Perkins song, recorded in 1956. It was a favourite of the Beatles, who considered it for release in 1964. Although it eventually was not included on their discs, we know the Decca audition version and four more takes at the BBC. Lead vocalist: Paul.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog has the best sounding tape and includes new segments, although "From Me To You" is slightly longer on Great Dane, which also has a more complete version of the show outro. Naturally these were all merged into the best presentation possible for this show.

PGTB #2

RECORDED: 01 June, 1963, 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 11 June, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Lee Peters
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: The Countrymen

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. TOO MUCH MONKEY BUSINESS BBC.19.01
3. I GOT TO FIND MY BABY BBC.19.02
4. YOUNG BLOOD BBC.19.03
5. BABY IT'S YOU BBC.19.04
6. TILL THERE WAS YOU BBC.19.05
7. LOVE ME DO BBC.19.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

This programme was taped the same day as the previous one; actually, they first recorded PGTB (3) and then PGTB (2).

THE SONGS

3. "I Got To Find My Baby" was another Chuck Berry number, first played by Little Walter in 1954 and released by Berry in 1960. The Beatles played it twice at the BBC, this performance being distinctly better. Lead vocalist: John.

4. "Young Blood". A song originally released by The Coasters in 1957. This is the only available Beatles version. Lead vocalist: George

THE SOUND
Yellow Dog sounds better and includes new segments


June 19th, 1963
EASY BEAT
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 19 June, 1963, 8:45 - 9:45 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 23 June, 1963, 10:31- 11:30 a.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Ron Belchier

1. SOME OTHER GUY BBC.21.01
2. A TASTE A HONEY BBC.21.02
3. THANK YOU GIRL BBC.21.03
4. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.21.04

The last appearance of "Some Other Guy" and a fascinating version of "Thank You Girl" with a different arrangement for the background vocals. This programme was recorded in front of a live audience.

THE SOUND

The origianal Pyramid release wins out on this one although a few seconds of applause at the end of "A Taste Of Honey" were grafted on from Yellow Dog. Otherwise, YD's release is a little distorted.


April 4th, 1963
SIDE BY SIDE
BBC Paris Theatre, London

RECORDED: 04 April, 1963, 11:00 a.m - 2:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 24 June, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: John Dunn
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. SIDE BY SIDE BBC.22.01
2. TOO MUCH MONKEY BUSINESS BBC.22.02
3. LOVE ME DO
4. BOYS BBC.22.04
5. I'LL BE ON MY WAY BBC.22.05
6. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.22.06

THE SONGS

5. "I'll Be On My Way". This is the most fascinating item of the programme, and for sure one of the highlights of the Beatles' entire BBC career. It is a Lennon-McCartney song which the Beatles gave to Billy J. Kramer and never recorded for EMI. Billy J.'s recording at EMI took place the same day as the Beatles' BBC session (April 4, 1963), so it seems likely that the group tried out the song at the BBC before giving it to the performer. When more than two months later the programme was broadcast, Billy J. Kramer had already scored number one in the charts! 'Love Me Do' apparently has not been preserved.

THE SOUND

Becase of Yellow Dog's glitch, the theme song is taken from a combination of Silent Sea and BBC Trailer (Trailer silenced out the gap in the tape, but sounded better, SS kept the tape hiss - we merged them). Otherwise Yellow Dog is the best source.


June 17th, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 4
Studio Number 5, BBC Maida Vale, Delaware Road, London W9

RECORDED: 17 June, 1963, 10:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 25 June, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Lee Peters
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: The Bachelors

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. ANNA (GO TO HIM) BBC.23.01
3. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.23.02
4. BOYS BBC.23.03
5. CHAINS BBC.23.04
6. P.S. I LOVE YOU BBC.23.05
7. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.23.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES
9. A TASTE OF HONEY (recorded but not broadcast)

somewhat less interesting programme, where the Beatles only played already released material. This was to be the last programme of the series, but with the tremendous success it had, 11 more programmes were scheduled for the following months.

THE SOUND

The majority of this show was taken from Yellow Dog, which sounds better. However YD simply copies the Masterfraction versions of track 6 while Great Dane's tape is longer at the end of each.


June 24th, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 24 June, 1963, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 29 June, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. I GOT TO FIND MY BABY BBC.24.01
2. MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE BBC.24.02
3. MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) BBC.24.03
4. TILL THERE WAS YOU BBC.24.04
5. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.24.05
6. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN BBC.24.06

A session mainly devoted to Chuck Berry, with three of his songs, all unreleased when the show was aired (as was also "Money").

THE SOUND
Yellow Dog's version sounds better, but the beginning of "Till There Was You" is clipped, so that was restored from Great Dane


July 3rd, 1963
THE BEAT SHOW
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

RECORDED: 03 July, 1963, 8:00 - 9:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 04 July, 1963, 1:00 - 1:30 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Gay Byrne
PRODUCER: Geoff Lawrence

1. FROM ME TO YOU
2. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.25.02
3. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.25.03

Recorded before a live audience.Track 1 is not currently available to collectors,tracks 2 and 3 only survived on a tape of inferior quality.

THE SOUND

The original Purple Chick presentation remains the best - a combination of Great Dane and an unbooted tape.


July 2nd, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 5
Number 5 Studio, BBC Maida Vale, London

RECORDED: 02 July, 1963, 6:30 - 9:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 16 July, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: Duffy Power and The Graham Bond Quartet

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. THAT'S ALL RIGHT (MAMA) BBC.26.01
3. THERE'S A PLACE BBC.26.02
4. CAROL BBC.26.03
5. SOLDIER OF LOVE BBC.26.04
6. LEND ME YOUR COMB BBC.26.05
7. CLARABELLA BBC.26.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES
9. THREE COOL CATS (not broadcast)
10. SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN (not broadcast)
11. ASK ME WHY (not broadcast)

The best of the BBC Beatles performances! Of the nine songs recorded for this show, seven were never to appear on a Beatles disc; five of these have been transmitted (luckily those which were not taped on other BBC sessions), while "Sweet Little Sixteen" was re-recorded for the next programme of the series. "Three Cool Cats" had an unfortunate fate at the BBC: it was taped twice (the first time during the recording session for Here We Go, January 25, 1963) but never broadcast; we only know it from the Decca session.

THE SONGS

2. "That's All Right" was Elvis Presley's first single, released back in 1954. As with the other classics broadcast in this programme, this is the only BBC version ever taped by the Beatles. Lead vocalist, much in Presley's style, is Paul.

4. "Carol". A rock'n'roll song written by Chuck Berry and released in 1958. As is often the case with Berry's repertoire, the group adheres closely to the original while John sings a very spirited vocal.

5. "Soldier Of Love". An intriguing song by Arthur Alexander, released in 1962, and a powerful interpretation by John. Also excellent is Ringo's drumming.

6. "Lend Me Your Comb". A Carl Perkins tune released in the U.K. in 1958 and also included on the Hamburg December 31, 1962 tape. Lead vocal is shared by John & Paul.

7. "Clarabella". This song was released by the Jodimars in 1956, but failed to have any particular success on either side of the ocean. It is thus somewhat surprising that the Beatles played their own version of this number which was probably completely unknown to their audience. Nevertheless, it's a great performance by Paul.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog is horribly distorted throughout so we stuck with Great Dane for the most part - which sounds great.


July 17th, 1963
EASY BEAT
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 17 July, 1963, 08:45 - 09:45 p.m.
TRANSMITTED.: 21 July, 1963, 10:31 - 11:30 a.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Ron Belchier

1. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.27.01
2. A SHOT OF RHYTHM AND BLUES BBC.27.02
3. THERE'S A PLACE BBC.27.03
4. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.27.04

The second of the three BBC performances of track 2 and the only one in front of a live audience.

THE SOUND

There's really not much in it, but we went with Yellow Dog.


July 10th, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 6 + BBC POP GO THE BEATLES 7
Number 2 Studio, BBC Aeolian Hall

PGTB #6

RECORDED: 10 July, 1963, 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED.: 23 July, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: Carter Lewis and the Southerners

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN BBC.28.01
3. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.28.02
4. NOTHIN' SHAKIN' BBC.28.03
5. LOVE ME DO BBC.28.04
6. LONESOME TEARS IN MY EYES BBC.28.05
7. SO HOW COME (NO ONE LOVES ME) BBC.28.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

Again a great show: three songs were only taped on this occasion during the Beatles' BBC career, and also the re-recording of "Sweet Little Sixteen". rack three was thought to have been lost, but eventually surfaced on 'The Beatles Live At The BBC' CD.

THE SONGS

2. "Sweet Little Sixteen". One of the most famous (and covered) Berry songs, originally released in 1958. It was a mainstay in the Beatles repertoire and was also recorded at the Star Club, Hamburg. Lead vocalist is John, who gives a great performance.

4. "Nothin' Shakin' ". A rockabilly number sung by George, who obviously liked this style. It was originally recorded by Eddie Fontaine in 1958.

6. "Lonesome Tears In My Eyes" is a Johnny Burnette Trio number released in November 1956. Lead vocalist is John.

7. "So How Come (No One Loves Me)". This Everly Brothers song enjoyed success in the USA in late 1960. Lead vocalist: George

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog generally sounds better and has a new segment.

PGTB #7

RECORDED: 10.07.1963, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 30.07.1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: The Searchers

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE BBC.29.01
3. DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET BBC.29.02
4. TILL THERE WAS YOU BBC.29.03
5. MATCHBOX BBC.29.04
6. PLEASE MR. POSTMAN BBC.29.05
7. THE HIPPY HIPPY SHAKE BBC.29.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

NOTES
This programme was recorded the same day as PGBT (6). At the time of this broadcast tracks 5 and 6 were unreleased, while tracks 2 and 7 never made it onto record.

THE SONGS

5. "Matchbox". Although credited to Carl Perkins, this is in fact an old blues song recorded by Blind Lemon Jefferson in 1927. Perkins' version, from which the Beatles derived their cover, was released in 1957. This take predates the officially released version by nearly one year and is slightly different in lyrics and arrangement. Lead vocalist: Ringo

THE SOUND

For the most part, Yellow Dog sounds better - it also has a new segment - except for the tracks included on the Masterfraction release. Even for those YD has slightly longer fades, so we edited them back in. The old vinyl release Broadcasts has a version of "Til There Was You" without the wow and flutter caused by tape drag that is evident on other releases, so we used that here, editing on the clipped beginning and end from Yellow Dog.


July 16th, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 8 +

POP GO THE BEATLES 9 +

POP GO THE BEATLES 10
BBC Paris Theatre, London

PGTB #8

RECORDED: 16 July 1963, 3:00 - 5:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 06 August,1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: The Swinging Blue Jeans

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. I'M GONNA SIT RIGHT DOWN AND CRY BBC.30.01
3. CRYING, WAITING, HOPING BBC.30.02
4. KANSAS CITY/HEY!-HEY!-HEY!-HEY! BBC.30.03
5. TO KNOW HER IS TO LOVE HER BBC.30.04
6. THE HONEYMOON SONG BBC.30.05
7. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.30.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

Together with Pop Go The Beatles (5), this is the most important BBC programme ever taped by the Beatles. In August 1963, only track 7 was known to the audience, and track 4 would be released on disc only more than one year later. All the other songs were played at the BBC only on this occasion.

THE SONGS

2. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You)" was first recorded by Roy Hamilton in 1954 and also released by Elvis Presley in 1956. The Beatles covered this second version. Lead vocalist: Paul.

3. "Crying Waiting Hoping". Another highlight from the unreleased BBC takes. This song was recorded by Buddy Holly just a few weeks before his tragical death in the plane crash of February 2, 1959. A backing track was added to his home-recorded voice and guitar, and the disc was released in June 1959. The Beatles were great fans of Buddy Holly and recorded this song both at the Decca audition and for this programme, this version being by far better. Lead vocalist: George.

4. "Kansas City/ Hey!-Hey!-Hey!-Hey!". Little Richard recorded his own composition "Hey!-Hey!-Hey!-Hey! (Goin' Back To Birmingham) in 1958. In 1959 he rerecorded it in a medley with "Kansas City", which was a number one single in the USA for Wilbert Harrison in May 1959. The Beatles included this medley in their repertoire from the beginning. Paul, who was particularly fond of Little Richard's songs, takes the lead vocal.

5. "To Know Her Is To Love Her". This is the Beatles' cover version (with "him" changed to "her") of the Teddy Bears' number from 1958, with a noticeably different arrangement (the Teddy Bears were Phil Spector, who would produce the "Let It Be" album at the end of the Beatles' career, with Annette Kleinbard and Marshall Leib). It was also played by the Fab Four in Hamburg. Lead vocalist: John

6. "The Honeymoon Song". The title song from the 1959 film "Honeymoon" was first performed by Manuel and the Music of the Mountains. In June 1959 Marino Marini and his Quartet released a vocal version. Although not typical of the Beatles' style, Paul seems to have liked this song a lot since he not only sang it at the BBC but also produced a version for Mary Hopkin in 1969.

THE SOUND

For the most part Yellow Dog sounds better and has a longer outro to "To Know Her Is To Love Her". The exception are the songs which appear on Masterfraction, which sound better, but have the longer endings from Yellow Dog restored.

PGTB #9

RECORDED: 16 July, 1963, 6:00 - 8:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 13 August, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery & Ian Grant
GUEST GROUP: The Hollies

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. LONG TALL SALLY BBC.31.01
3. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.31.02
4. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.31.03
5. YOU REALLY GOT A HOLD ON ME BBC.31.04
6. I'LL GET YOU BBC.31.05
7. I GOT A WOMAN BBC.31.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

This programme was taped the same day as PGTB (8) and PGTB (10), a real marathon in the BBC studio. Only three items were unreleased when broadcast (2, 5 and 7), and only track 7 has not been released by the Beatles; however, "She Loves You" and "I'll Get You" make their debut here (they would be released as a single on August 23). John and Paul make a little mistake with the lyrics of "She Loves You".

THE SONGS

7. "I Got A Woman". A hit by Ray Charles in 1954, covered by Elvis Presley in 1956. The group played Elvis' version twice at the BBC. Both these takes are powerful, although quite different from each other. Another unforgettable performance.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog generally sounds better. However "I Got A Woman" is superior on Masterfraction, but again the longer Yellow Dog ending is Yellow Dog restored.

PGTB #10

RECORDED: 16 July, 1963, 8:45 - 10:50 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 20 August, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Terry Henebery
GUEST GROUP: Russ Sainty and the Nu Notes

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.31.03 (repeated from PGTB #9)
3. WORDS OF LOVE BBC.32.01
4. GLAD ALL OVER BBC.32.02
5. I JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND BBC.32.03
6. DEVIL IN HER HEART BBC.32.04
7. SLOW DOWN BBC.32.05
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

The third programme recorded on July 16. Track 2 is the same version broadcast on August 13 and was the only song performedin this show to be known by the audience in August 1963. Track 6 only appeared on disc in November 1963, track 7 in June 1964, and track 3 in December 1964.

THE SONGS

3. "Words Of Love". Another Buddy Holly number, originally released in 1957. This and the next song have great rockabilly guitar by George. John and Paul share the vocal leads.

4. "Glad All Over". A Carl Perkins song released in December 1957 in the USA. As with most of Perkins' numbers in the Beatles repertoire, it was sung by George.

5. "I Just Don't Understand". Another song not typical of the Beatles' style, originally performed by actress Ann-Margret in 1961. John took lead vocals. It's the only known version by the group.

6. "Devil In Her Heart" was recorded by the girl-group the Donays in 1962. The Beatles slightly changed the title ("his" was replaced by "her") and covered it twice at the BBC in a version very similar to that released on their second LP.

7. "Slow Down". An old blues song in a rock 'n' roll version credited to Larry Williams, who released it in 1958. The Beatles included it on the "Beatles for Sale" LP, and played it only once at the BBC, this version being noticeably different from the 1964 release.

THE SOUND

Again, Yellow Dog is the best choice for the majority of this show. This time, the tracks taken from Masterfraction don't need to have their endings edited back. The beeb vinyl series has a couple of extra words at the end which we restored.


July 30th, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 30 July, 1963, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 24 August, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. LONG TALL SALLY BBC.33.01
2. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.33.02
3. GLAD ALL OVER BBC.33.03
4. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.33.04
5. YOU REALLY GOT A HOLD ON ME BBC.33.05
6. I'LL GET YOU BBC.33.06

The fifth appearance on Saturday Club. The Beatles promoted their latest single and played three then-unreleased songs. "Long Tall Sally" is probably better here than on the officially released record.

THE SOUND

Perhaps it's the glitch, but Yellow Dog's "Long Tall Sally" seems inferior to Purple Chick's unbotted tape. Conversely, YD's "She Loves You" wins over PC. The intro of "Glad All Over" (with voiceover) has been edited back onto the YD version, which omits it.


August 1st, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 11 +

POP GO THE BEATLES 12
The Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

PGTB #11

RECORDED: 01 August, 1963, 1:30 - 4:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 27 August, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Ian Grant
GUEST GROUP: The Cyril Davis Rhythm and Blues All Stars with Long John Baldry


1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. OOH! MY SOUL BBC.34.01
3. DON'T EVER CHANGE BBC.34.02
4. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.34.03
5. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.34.04
6. ANNA (GO TO HIM) BBC.34.05
7. A SHOT OF RHYTHM AND BLUES BBC.34.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

This programme includes two songs only recorded once (tracks 2 and 3) and the last appearance of track 7.

THE SONGS

2. "Ooh! My Soul". Another Little Richard number, originally released in May 1958; as usual with his material, Paul offers a powerful rendition.

3. "Don't Ever Change" was first released by The Crickets in 1962; John and Paul share the vocals in the Beatles cover.

THE SOUND

"She Loves You" is new to Yellow Dog, which also has two new segments and sounds better than Great Dane's version. Even so, Masterfraction is still the best source for some tracks.

PGTB #12

RECORDED: 01 August, 1963, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED.: 03 September, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Ian Grant
GUEST GROUP: Brian Poole and the Tremeloes

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.35.01
3. I'LL GET YOU BBC.35.02
4. MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) BBC.35.03
5. THERE'S A PLACE BBC.35.04
6. HONEY DON'T BBC.35.05
7. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN BBC.35.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES
9. LUCILLE (not broadcast)
10. BABY IT'S YOU (not broadcast)

Tracks 5, 6 and 7 were then-unreleased.According to some sources, the Beatles also taped a version of "She Loves You" which was not broadcast. Probably this refers to the take which was broadcast on August 27, as often they did not record the songs twice that were scheduled for two different programmes when these were taped in the same session. "Lucille", not broadcast on this occasion, was performed on two later BBC shows.

THE SONGS

6. "Honey Don't". Originally released by Carl Perkins in December 1955 and covered by Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks (later The Band) in 1960. The Beatles played it on four BBC programmes and later released it on,disc with Ringo on vocals. The first two BBC recordings feature John on the vocals, and this one in particular is an absolutely terrific performance.

THE SOUND

"From Me To You" - Yellow Dog's tape is better, but runs too fast, which we fixed.
"I'll Get You" - Purple Chick - the original appearance of this track - is still the best, and the same is true for PC's unbooted "There's A Place."
"Money" has a new intro on Yellow Dog, which also has two segments which are longer than before.


September 3rd, 1963
POP GO THE BEATLES 13 +

POP GO THE BEATLES 14 +

POP GO THE BEATLES 15
Number 2 Studio, BBC Aeolian Hall, London

PGTB #13

RECORDED: 03 September, 1963, 2:00 - 4:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 10 September, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Ian Grant
GUEST GROUP: Johnny Kidd and the Pirates


1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. TOO MUCH MONKEY BUSINESS BBC.36.01
3. LOVE ME DO BBC.36.02
4. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.36.03
5. I'LL GET YOU BBC.36.04
6. A TASTE OF HONEY BBC.36.05
7. THE HIPPY HIPPY SHAKE BBC.36.06
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

After track 2 Paul announces "Till There Was You", and it is also listed in the BBC archives. But in fact "Too Much Monkey Business" is followed by "Love Me Do", and this really seems to be the way the programme ran (no edit is apparently present on the original tape). Also, track 6 is not indicated in the BBC archives. It is very likely that some mistake occurred at the BBC during the preparation of this and the two following transmissions, which were all recorded the same day. This show features the last appearance of track 2, which was played four times at the BBC.

THE SOUND

Again, Yellow Dog is the best sounding, except for "Too Much Monkey Business" Masterfraction (which has YD's longer ending appended here).Unfortunately I'll Get You suffers from a mastering glitch, so we used Great Dane instead - although there really wasn't too much in it.

PGTB #14

RECORDED: 03 September,1963, 5:00 - 7:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 17 September, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Ian Grant
GUEST GROUP: The Marauders

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. CHAINS BBC.37.02
3. YOU REALLY GOT A HOLD ON ME BBC.37.02
4. MISERY BBC.37.02
5. LUCILLE BBC.37.02
6. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.37.02
7. BOYS BBC.37.02
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

Apart from the unreleased "Lucille",this show is notable for the performance of "Chains", which is quite different from the released version and closely matches the Cookies' original.

THE SONGS
5. "Lucille" was another classic by Little Richard released in March 1957. It must surely be one of Paul's favourites, as he continued singing it even in the nineties, thirty years after these performances (although, quite obviously, the powerful interpretation at the BBC cannot be matched nowadays!). This song was taped three times during the BBC programmes, and broadcast twice.

THE SOUND

Yellow dog for all this show.

PGTB #15

RECORDED: 03 September, 1963, 8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 24 September, 1963, 5:00 - 5:29 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rodney Burke
PRODUCER: Ian Grant
GUEST GROUP: Tony Rivers and the Castaways

1. POP GO THE BEATLES
2. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.36.03 (repeated from PGTB #13)
3. ASK ME WHY BBC.38.01
4. DEVIL IN HER HEART BBC.38.02
5. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.38.03
6. SURE TO FALL (IN LOVE WITH YOU) BBC.38.04
7. TWIST AND SHOUT BBC.38.05
8. POP GO THE BEATLES

The last programme in the fifteen-part series. For the last two programmes the Beatles reduced the unreleased material to two songs per programme (here, track 4, later to be released on disc, and track 6, one of their favourites). Track 2 is the same take broadcast on PGTB (13).

THE SOUND

Great Dane was used to fix a tape flaw in "I Saw Her Standing There," otherwise it's Yellow Dog all the way - it even has a slightly longer outro.


September 7th, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 07 September, 1963, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 05 October, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews


1. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.39.01
2. MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE BBC.39.02
3. HAPPY BIRTHDAY SATURDAY CLUB BBC.39.03
4. I'LL GET YOU BBC.39.04
5. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.39.05
6. LUCILLE BBC.39.06

This session was inserted into the Fifth Birthday Anniversary edition of Saturday Club, and the Beatles performed a special rendition of "Happy Birthday" with amended lyrics. This show also features the last of the five appearances of "Memphis, Tennessee" and the last of the two of "Lucille". Track 5 was rebroadcast on Saturday Club December 21.

THE SOUND
Yellow Dog is better for the first half, whilst Great Dane sounds best for the second. There's really not much in it though.


October 16th, 1963
EASY BEAT
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 16 October, 1963, 9:00 - 10:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 20 October, 1963, 10:31 - 11:30 a.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Ron Belchier

1. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.40.01
2. LOVE ME DO BBC.40.02
3. PLEASE PLEASE ME BBC.40.03
4. FROM ME TO YOU BBC.40.04
5. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.40.05

Recorded in front of a live audience. Although there are no unreleased tracks, this session features one of the most exciting performances of "I Saw Her Standing There" that the Beatles ever played. Tracks 2 and 3 are performed at the BBC for the last time.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog's tape is much better, although there's a glitch in the first track, so we used BBC Trailer to patch it.


October 9th, 1963
THE KEN DODD SHOW
BBC Paris Theatre, London

RECORDED: 09 October, 1963, 10:00 - 11:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED:03 November, 1963, 2:30 - 3:00 - 8:00 - 8:30 pm.
PRODUCER: Bill Worsley

1. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.41.01

This show was part of the series starring the Liverpudlian comedian Ken Dodd. It was recorded before a live audience, and in this edition the musical interlude featured the Beatles. There is no absolute certainty that the version of "She Loves You" here included is the one broadcast on The Ken Dodd Show. This is how this performance has been traded among collectors, and indeed it is different from all the other "live" performances of known origin. If from a radio programme, then it is surely the Ken Dodd Show. Alternatively (and perhaps more likely), it could be from a TV show, and in this case there are good chances that it is from "Sunday Night At The London Palladium", October 13, 1963 ("Twist and Shout" recently surfaced from this show). It is not from the October 1963 Sweedish TV programme "Drop In" (as was previously thought). In spite of its uncertain attribution, we preferred to include this item: after all, it could be the Ken Dodd show.

THE SOUND

Missing entirely from Yellow Dog, we stuck with Purple Chick's unbooted upgrade.


December 17th, 1963
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 17 December 1963, 3:00 - 6:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 21 December, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS
2. ALL MY LOVING
3. THIS BOY BBC.42.01
4. I WANT TO HOLD YOU HAND BBC.42.02
5. TILL THERE WAS YOU BBC.42.03
6. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN BBC.42.04
7. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.42.05
8. SHAZAM 'CRIMBLE MEDLEY' BBC.42.06

A special Christmas edition of Saturday Club, with the Beatles playing a few traditionals and the "Chrimble Medley" in which John sings snatches of their five hits ("Love Me Do", "Please Please Me", "FromMe To You", "She Loves You", and "I Want To Hold Your Hand") and "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer". Announcer Brian Matthews describes it as a "muddley . . . I'm sorry . . . a medley". The linking riff played on guitar and bass is from Duane Eddy's "Shazam!". By now, with more singles and the second LP released, the group had a larger repertoire to promote, and the unreleased tunes became rare. Track 2 has not been preserved (there is only Paul's intro to it).

THE SOUND

We went mostly with Yellow Dog for this show. They moved the intro and placed itbefore "I Want To Hold Your Hand" if you disagree, you can move it back! "Til There Was You" sounds best on Yellow Dog, but is clipped at either end. We restored the beginning with Great Dane and the end with Beeb.

Also, for what it's worth, "what will they do without amplifiers" is longer on YD whilst "I like it" is two words shorter.


December 18th, 1963
FROM US TO YOU
BBC Paris Theatre, London

RECORDED: 18 December, 1963, 7:00 - 10:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 26 December, 1963, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Rolf Harris
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. FROM US TO YOU BBC.43.01
2. SHE LOVES YOU BBC.43.02
3. ALL MY LOVING BBC.43.03
4. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN BBC.43.04
5. TILL THERE WAS YOU BBC.43.05
6. BOYS BBC.43.06
7. MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) BBC.43.07
8. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.43.08
9. TIE ME KANGAROO DOWN, SPORT BBC.43.09
10. I WANT TO HOLD YOU HAND BBC.43.10
11. FROM US TO YOU BBC.43.11

The first of five specials held on a Bank Holiday, four of which were titled From Us To You. This one was presented by the Australian singer Rolf Harris, who had a smash hit (number 3) in the USA then with "Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport". He performed together with the Beatles for a hilarious version with parody lyrics. The opening and closing themes are a variation of the hit "From Me To You", with "I"/"Me" replaced by "We"/"Us".

THE SOUND

The first two bars of "From Us To You" are missing on Yellow Dog's presentation of this show, so they had to be patched in with Great Dane's. Otherwise, YD is definitely better sounding and complete apart from Purple Chick's unbooted "blue skies by jeannie lamb" intro.


January 7th, 1964
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 07 January, 1964, 2:30 - 4:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 15 February, 1964, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. ALL MY LOVING BBC.44.01
2. MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) BBC.44.02
3. THE HIPPY HIPPY SHAKE BBC.44.03
4. I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND BBC.42.02
5. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN BBC.44.04
6. JOHNNY B. GOODE BBC.44.05
7. I WANNA BE YOUR MAN BBC.44.06

An interesting session, which features the last of the five appearances of track 3 and the only known recording of track 6. Track 4 is the same take recorded for the previous Saturday Club (recorded 21.12.1963).

THE SONGS
6. "Johnny B. Goode" is probably the best-known song by Chuck Berry, originally released in 1958. It was (and still is) in the repertoire of nearly every rock band. The Beatles' version is somewhat different from the original but not particularly remarkable. Lead vocalist is John.

THE SOUND
Yellow dog almost all the way, including a new intro. Alas the "and it was old ringo" outro is missing entirely as is the very end of "I Wanna Be Your Man" so these were taken from Great Dane.

February 28th, 1964
FROM US TO YOU
Number 1 Studio, BBC Piccadilly Theatre, London

RECORDED: 28 February, 1964, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 30 March, 1964, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Alan Freeman
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. FROM US TO YOU BBC.45.01
2. YOU CAN'T DO THAT BBC.45.02
3. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN BBC.45.03
4. TILL THERE WAS YOU BBC.45.04
5. I WANNA BE YOUR MAN BBC.45.05
6. PLEASE MR. POSTMAN BBC.45.06
7. ALL MY LOVING BBC.45.07
8. THIS BOY BBC.45.08
9. CAN'T BUY ME LOVEBBC.45.09
10. FROM US TO YOU BBC.45.01

A session devoted to the promotion of their records, without unreleased tracks. This show is probably more interesting for the Beatles' chats than for the music.

THE SOUND

Once more a good combination of Yellow Dog and Masterfraction gives the best presentation of this show.


March 31st, 1964
SATURDAY CLUB
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 31 March, 1964, 7:00 - 10:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 04 April, 1964, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Bernie Andrews

1. EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY BBC.46.01
2. I CALL YOUR NAME BBC.46.02
3. I GOT A WOMAN BBC.46.03
4. YOU CAN'T DO THAT BBC.46.04
5. CAN'T BUY ME LOVE BBC.46.05
6. SURE TO FALL (IN LOVE WITH YOU) BBC.46.06
7. LONG TALL SALLY BBC.46.07

Track 2 was performed only on this show.Apart from promoting their new EP "Long Tall Sally", this is an important show for the terrific performance of track 3, in its second appearance at the BBC. This take is much different from the previous one, and is among the best BBC unreleased tracks. John's vocals are double tracked, a rare occurrence at the BBC. The performance of "Sure To Fall" is excellent, too. It seems as if the group tested some covers for further release in these early 1964 sessions. Of the three then-unreleased songs (tracks 1, 3 and 6), only the first one - probably the weakest - made it onto disc.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog mostly. The end of Long Tall Sally is more complete on Great Dane and also contains the outro, which YD does not. However the vinyl "Broadcasts" has a better quality tape altogether (the start and end of which is slightly clipped) so we used that and fixed the clipping.

The original Beeb vinyl has an extra word on one of the other outros, whilst the YD "was that request really from your mother" is missing some segments that are on filler beebs and the beeb vinyl(!)
Also, Beeb has an extra word at the start of "I Got A Woman"


May 1st, 1964
FROM US TO YOU
BBC Paris Theatre, London

RECORDED: 01 May, 1964, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 18 May, 1964, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Alan Freeman
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. FROM US TO YOU BBC.47.01
2. I SAW HER STANDING THERE BBC.47.02
3. KANSAS CITY/ HEY!-HEY!-HEY!-HEY! BBC.47.03
4. WHIT MONDAY TO YOU (HAPPY BIRTHDAY)
5. I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET BBC.47.04
6. YOU CAN'T DO THAT BBC.47.05
7. SURE TO FALL (IN LOVE WITH YOU) BBC.47.06
8. CAN'T BUY ME LOVE BBC.47.07
9. MATCHBOX BBC.47.08
10. HONEY DON'T BBC.47.09
11. FROM US TO YOU BBC.47.01

The most interesting From Us To You session, which presented four songs as yet unreleased when broadcast (tracks 3, 5, 7 and 10). Tracks 5 and 7 were never commercially released, while the other two items were included on the "Beatles For Sale" LP. This is the last BBC programme where the Beatles performed songs which did not make it onto disc. John Lennon again takes the vocal lead on "Honey Don't".

THE SONGS
5. "I Forgot To Remember To Forget" was released by Elvis Presley in 1955. The Beatles' cover version is sung by George.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog all the way, baby.


July 14th, 1964
TOP GEAR
Studio 2, Broadcasting House, London

RECORDED: 14 July, 1964, 7:00 - 11:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 16 July, 1964, 10:00 - 11:55 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Bernie Andrews

1. LONG TALL SALLY BBC.48.01
2. THINGS WE SAID TODAY BBC.48.02
3. A HARD DAY'S NIGHTBBC.48.03
4. AND I LOVE HER BBC.48.04
5. I SHOULD HAVE KNOWN BETTER BBC.48.05
6. IF I FELL BBC.48.06
7. YOU CAN'T DO THAT BBC.48.07

A promotional session for their third LP. Track 1 features another terrific performance by Paul! Track 5 is the commercially released version. Selected parts of this show were broadcast in the USA.

THE SOUND

Although Yellow Dog has a superior tape, we have to go to Masterfraction for some better-sounding tracks. "Things We Said Today" is mainly taken from there, but YD takes over at the beginning (no voice over) and end (much longer). YD is also missing a few parts of the "lots more from the unruly four" segment.

Why there are three different versions of "hold it" will probably remain a mystery...


July 17th, 1964
FROM US TO YOU
BBC Paris Theatre, London

RECORDED: 17 July, 1964, 2:15 - 6:15 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 03 August, 1964, 10:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Don Wardell
PRODUCER: Bryant Marriott

1. FROM US TO YOU BBC.49.01
2. LONG TALL SALLYBBC.49.02
3. IF I FELLBBC.49.03
4. I'M HAPPY JUST TO DANCE WITH YOUBBC.49.04
5. THINGS WE SAID TODAYBBC.49.05
6. I SHOULD HAVE KNOWN BETTERBBC.49.06
7. BOYSBBC.49.07
8. KANSAS CITY/ HEY!-HEY!-HEY!-HEY!BBC.49.08
9. A HARD DAY'S NIGHTBBC.49.09
10. FROM US TO YOUBBC.49.01

The only live performance of track 4. The Beatles now had less time to spend on the BBC sessions, and three months passed before their next programme.

Part of the recording session is also included here. The first take of "From Us To You" has bad lyrics ("me" instead of "us" at the end), the second is the complete theme, without the announcer's voice. The first "I'm Happy Just To Dance With You" is the backing track before the overdubbed vocals. "I Should Have Known Better" has a false start, the next version lacks the harmonica, which was later overdubbed for the broadcast version.

THE SOUND

Yellow Dog is the winner for this one, and also for the recording session, although PC does have its good points.


November 17th, 1964
TOP GEAR
The Playhouse Theatre, London

RECORDED: 17 November, 1964, 7:30 - 11:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 26 November, 1964, 10:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCER: Bernie Andrews

1. I'M A LOSERBBC.50.01
2. HONEY DON'T BBC.50.02
3. SHE'S A WOMANBBC.50.03
4. EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY BBC.50.04
5. I'LL FOLLOW THE SUN BBC.50.05
6. I FEEL FINE BBC.50.06

A session devoted to the promotion of their new single and LP releases. The recording for tracks 1, 3, 4 and 6 was used again for Saturday Club of December 26, 1964. This is the only BBC recording of track 5. This time "Honey Don't" is sung by Ringo.

THE SOUND

We used Yellow Dog for most of this, although it's missing some parts of the "few, hard facts" segment. Also, they completely screw up "Honey Don't" by repeating a solo and chorus. Naturally we fixed it.


November 25th, 1964
SATURDAY CLUB
Number 2 Studio, BBC Aeolian Hall, London

RECORDED: 25 November, 1964, 7:00 - 10:30 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 26 December, 1964, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Brian Matthew
PRODUCERS: Jimmy Grant & Brian Willey

1. ROCK AND ROLL MUSIC BBC.51.01
2. I'M A LOSER
3. EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY
4. I FEEL FINE
5. KANSAS CITY/ HEY!-HEY!-HEY!-HEY! BBC.51.02
6. SHE'S A WOMAN

A session notable for the great performance by John on "Rock And Roll Music", which is better here than on its commercially released counterpart. As mentioned before, the recordings for tracks 2, 3, 4 and 6 are the same as broadcast on Top Gear of November 26, 1964. The recordings for these two programmes were mixed together for a broadcast on the Top Of The Pops series in the USA, aired in early 1965. Chats from both Top Gearand Saturday Club were edited in various pieces for the USA rebroadcast, with new Brian Matthew parts. In some cases the songs fade out earlier in the US rebroadcasts to allow a new voice-over by Matthew.

THE SOUND

Once more, Yellow Dog comes out the winner, with a few minor tweaks for parts it's missing.


May 26th, 1965
THE BEATLES INVITE YOU TO TAKE A TICKET TO RIDE
Number 1 Studio, BBC Piccadilly Theatre, London

RECORDED: 26 May, 1965, 2:30 - 6:00 p.m.
TRANSMITTED: 07 June, 1965, 10:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m.
ANNOUNCER: Denny Piercy
PRODUCER: Keith Bateson

1. TICKET TO RIDE (Lennon-McCartney) BBC.52.07
2. EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO BE MY BABY (Perkins) BBC.52.01
3. I'M A LOSER (Lennon-McCartney) BBC.52.02
4. THE NIGHT BEFORE (Lennon-McCartney) BBC.52.03
5. HONEY DON'T (Perkins) BBC.52.04
6. DIZZY MISS LIZZY (Williams) BBC.52.05
7. SHE'S A WOMAN (Lennon-McCartney) BBC.52.06
8. TICKET TO RIDE (Lennon-McCartney) BBC.52.07

The last Bank Holiday special, and the end of the Beatles' BBC radio performances.

THE SOUND

Apart from the two Masterfraction tracks, Yellow Dog is the best presentation of this show.


The Beatles: Complete BBC Sessions Upgraded for 2004

All tracks cleaned up and speed checked. Source as noted.

bbc trailer = The Beatles Broadcast Collection Trailer (Yellow Dog)
beeb = The Beatles At The BEEB (BEEB Transcription Records)
broadcasts = Broadcasts (Circuit Records)
deflating = Deflating The Mythology (no label)
filler beebs = Attack Of The Filler Beebs (Silent Sea)
great dane = The Complete BBC Sessions (Great Dane)
masterfraction = Radio Sessions 1962-65 (Masterfraction)
pyramid = The Beatles At The BEEB (Pyramid)
unbooted = unique (originally, at least) to Purple Chick
yellow dog = At The Beeb (Yellow Dog)


You can get it here:
http://octaner.blogspot.com/2007/07/complete-bbc-sessions-upgraded-for-2004.html



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Upcoming new release of the 1965 Shea Stadium material sounds promising. LP version depicted.




The word is out that the underground (= bootleg) label HMC (His Master's Choice) is due to release a number of interesting new Beatles products in the near future and that it will all start with a Shea Stadium film in the same quality as the few clips Apple let us see in their Anthology DVDs. We are talking about two different products here:
  • A "HMC Gazette" with a DVD + CD
  • A 12" Vinyl LP + CD package with a colour poster
Rumoured is that the DVD contains the unreleased 2005 stereo remaster of the film commissioned by Apple. The audio contents are not known at the time of writing. HMC (formerly known as Yellow Dog) is primarily known for audio only bootlegs, but they recently released their first DVD (the Delaney & Bonnie concert from Copenhagen), so this new Shea will be their second DVD release. Further DVD releases of rare Beatles stuff is expected from the company in the next few months.

Due to the fact that "The Beatles At Shea Stadium" never has been released in an official capacity except for a few clips from the film used in documentaries, the film keeps being exploited by various bootleggers as well as being traded among fans. The undoctored soundtrack was leaked to the Beatlesfan community a few years ago and has been frequently used as a secondary soundtrack to bootleg DVDs of the film.

Below is a clip of "Dizzy Miss Lizzy" was used to promote a collection of Capitol Albums in 2007.
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1 comment: Links to this post

Source: http://wogew.blogspot.com/2014/04/upcoming-new-underground-shea-releases.html

Bonus Clip: Beatles "Can't Buy Me Love" from Shea Stadium
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We thought we’d start the new year with something very special. Just before Christmas, Apple Corps/Universal Music invited SuperDeluxeEdition in to take an exclusive look at the forthcoming Beatles box set, The U.S. Albums.

As previously announced on this blog, this special collection is released on 20 January 2014 and contains 13 CDs; titles released by Capitol Records in the 1960s that, for the most part, were quite different from their UK counterparts (new titles, alternate track listing, occasional mix differences).

The U.S. Albums box (the individual titles are also being released separately) celebrates 50 years since The Beatles’ started the so-called ‘British Invasion’, when I Want To Hold Your Hand hit number one in AmericaHalf a century hasn’t diminished the scale of that achievement. I Want To Hold Your Hand spent seven weeks and the top of the US charts and went on to sell an incredible five million copies. It only relinquished the top-spot to She Loves You (which had by that point already spent five weeks waiting patiently at number two!) and during this time The Beatles made their historic appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. Beatlemania was in full swing and in April 1964 the band held the top five positions in Billboard’s Hot 100.


WORLD EXCLUSIVE: First Pictures / The Beatles U.S. Albums box set

front
 We thought we’d start the new year with something very special. Just before Christmas, Apple Corps/Universal Music invited S