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Los Angeles, July 16, 2014 – Apple Corps Ltd., White Horse Pictures and Imagine Entertainment have announced they will produce a new authorized documentary for Apple, based on the first part of The Beatles’ career -- the touring years. The film will be directed by Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard and will be produced with the full cooperation of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison. White Horse’s Grammy Award-winning Nigel Sinclair, Scott Pascucci and Academy Award winner and multiple nominee Brian Grazer of Imagine Entertainment will produce with Howard. Imagine’s Michael Rosenberg and White Horse’s Guy East will serve as executive producers.

Howard said, "I am excited and honored to be working with Apple and the White Horse team on this astounding story of these four young men who stormed the world in 1964. Their impact on popular culture and the human experience cannot be exaggerated."

This film will focus on The Beatles’ journey from the early days of the Cavern Club in Liverpool and engagements in Hamburg to their last public concert in Candlestick Park, San Francisco, in 1966.

The Beatles began touring Europe in late 1963, after an extraordinary arrival on the British scene in 1961 and ‘62. However, it was their much-heralded Ed Sullivan appearance on February 9, 1964 that caused The Beatles’ popularity to explode. By June, the band had commenced their first world tour, and continued on a relentless schedule for two subsequent years. By the time the band stopped touring in August of 1966, they had performed 166 concerts in 15 countries and 90 cities around the world. The cultural phenomenon their touring helped create, known as "Beatlemania," was something the world had never seen before and laid the foundation for the globalization of culture.

Beatlemania was not just a phenomenon. It was the catalyst for a cultural shift that would alter the way people around the world viewed and consumed popular culture. This film will seek to explain what it was about that particular moment in time that allowed this cultural pivot point to occur. It will examine the social and political context of the time, and reveal the unique conditions that caused technology and mass communication to collide. The film will also explore the incomparable electricity between performer and audience that turned the music into a movement – a common experience into something sublime.

Founded in London in 1968, Apple Corps Ltd. represents The Beatles. Under the direction of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison, the company administers The Beatles’ business interests, and it also develops new creative projects, making a significant contribution to the staging and safekeeping of The Beatles’ musical and cultural legacies. Jeff Jones and Jonathan Clyde will act as executive producers for Apple Corps.

Over the course of a near 30-year partnership, Howard and Grazer have produced a long list of successful and critically acclaimed films, including Apollo 13, Frost/Nixon, A Beautiful Mind – for which Howard won an Academy Award for Best Director and Grazer and Howard won Best Picture – and, most recently, Rush, and music-driven films like 8 Mile. This will be the second documentary for Howard -- the first being 2013's Made in America.

Sinclair’s long association with documentaries has resulted in a string of award-winning films, including Martin Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World, which won two Emmy Awards and was nominated for a BAFTA, and No Direction Home: Bob Dylan, for which Sinclair won a Grammy Award, Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who, The Last Play At Shea, 1, and both the Academy Award-winning Undefeated and the Grammy Award-winning Foo Fighters: Back and Forth.

Pascucci, Managing Director of Concord Music Group and former head of Warner’s Rhino Entertainment, was an executive producer on George Harrison, and has recently been associated with Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival: 2013 and Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin’.

This project was originally brought to Apple Corps by One Voice One World, which has conducted extensive research around the globe, including inviting Beatles fans to send in clips of home movies and photos that they acquired during this extraordinary period. OVOW’s Matthew White, Stuart Samuels, and Bruce Higham will form part of the production team as co-producers.

Acclaimed and award winning editor Paul Crowder will serve as editor. Crowder directed and edited the Grammy-nominated Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who, The Last Play at Shea and the Formula One documentary, 1. Crowder’s long-time collaborator, Mark Monroe, will serve as writer. In addition to the aforementioned films, Monroe’s credits include Sound City, Chasing Ice, and the Academy Award-winning, The Cove. Marc Ambrose (Bhutto) will serve as supervising producer.

Nicholas Ferrall will be the executive in charge of production for White Horse Pictures, assisted by executives Jeanne Elfant Festa and Cassidy Hartmann. The Beatles documentary is one of the first projects under Nigel Sinclair’s new White Horse Pictures banner, which he founded in 2014 with long-time business partner Guy East.

Sinclair said, "The way The Beatles burst onto the scene in Britain was an overwhelming social, cultural and musical phenomenon, but was even then eclipsed by that extraordinary explosion on the American scene and then the world. I was lucky enough to see The Beatles perform in Glasgow in 1964, shortly after their Ed Sullivan appearance. It is an honor to work on this project for The Beatles, and to be collaborating again with the extraordinary Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, and my good friend Scott Pascucci."

Source: http://www.thebeatlesliveproject.com/#project_synopsis





Starting to circulate among collectors is a new, free 24 disc set of Beatles material from BBC Radio. The set is designed to accompany Kevin Howlett's book The Beatles: The BBC Archives 1962-1970. Each disc can be stored in a separate case, or they can be placed in slim cases and housed in the box intended for the book. They will fit in the UK box, not in the US one, because that box was a bit smaller.

In the book box
The set includes every known surviving BBC radio music and interview appearance from 1962-1970, plus guest appearances by other acts, and (as bonus items) interviews with those involved in the sessions.

The sessions are arranged chronologically, with several Special Editions including the complete 5th birthdaySaturday Club, The Beatles Abroad, all of the group's appearances on the Top Of The Pops radio series up to 1970, the BBC Beatles Night in December 1963, and even a DVD of their surviving BBC TV appearances.

All tracks have been pulled from the best possible sources including original transcription discs and tapes. Dropouts, mains hum and other annoyances have been carefully removed. Noise reduction has not been used, however it is present on some of the tracks, because noise reduction was used on the releases they are sourced from. Early fades have all been fixed where possible. This has been a huge undertaking, and I am sure the people behind it have spent years of research and audio enhancement work to accomplish such a comprehensive set. These are probably the dedicated and knowledgable fans who should have been trusted to master the Beatles' own official BBC recordings albums... A number of upgrades are included, plus some previously unheard guest appearances. And as a special bonus, a selection of never before heard continuity from the Light Program and Home Service is included, giving a bird's eye view into the hilariously stuffy state of British radio in the early 1960s.

The makers of this amazing collection are not doing it for profit, but because they feel all of The Beatles BBC material should be out there for fans to enjoy and historians to scrutinise. In fact, the set is distributed as free download links, and the people behind it are is are encouraging the fans to continue to distribute this set freely before it gets picked up and distributed for profit by the real bootleggers. They are also encouraging everyone to buy Kevin Howlett's book, not only to get the box to house the collection, but also because it's a vital piece of the BBC puzzle and will enable everyone to put the audio discs into context.  They are also asking people to support the artist and buy the official BBC albums. As they say: This is a fan project, not a bootleg. Don't charge money for copies.

If you have any of the previous releases of the material, like the one from Purple Chick (an earlier non-profit Beatles BBC project), this is a huge update, both regarding upgrades of songs, chat, intros and outtros as well as newly unearthed material. And if you have managed to get hold of the 2010 "Unsurpassed Broadcasts" series, this one surpasses it, both in volume and because it contains material that has been found since then. The set covers the same period that Howlett's book covers, so it goes all the way to 1970, whereas older BBC sets come to a halt after The Beatles' final original music performances in 1965. Doug Sulpy calls this set "core" in his latest issue of The 910, in fact he even hints that it may be too comprehensive! The one thing is, if you want discs, you have to burn them yourself, and the same goes for the artwork, you'll have to print it out.

Volume 1





You won't get this set from my blog, but look around the neighbourhood blogs, and I'm sure you'll stumble over it somewhere.

Source: http://wogew.blogspot.com/2015/01/comprehensive-bbc-set-starts-circulating.html

The Beatles - The BBC Archives 1962-1970 [5 Volumes] (2013) Lossless

Track Listing Details:
Artist: The Beatles
Title Of Album: The BBC Archives 1962-1970
Year Of Release: 2013
Label: 20th Century
Genre: Pop, Rock
Quality: Flac (tracks,cue)
Bitrate: Lossless
Total Time: 5 Vol's
Total Size: 1,34 Gb
WebSitethemortonreport

Tracklist:

Vol.1
1. BBC News March 1962 (2:38)
2. Ray Peters (0:07)
3. Dream Baby (1:48)
4. Ray Peters (0:05)
5. Memphis Tennessee (2:14)
6. Ray Peters (0:09)
7. Please Mr Postman (2:07)
8. Ray Peters (0:06)
9. Ask Me Why (2:17)
10. Ray Peters (0:07)
11. Besame Mucho (2:28)
12. Ray Peters (0:11)
13. A Picture of You (2:18)
14. Interview With Monty Lister (7:23)
15. Chains (1:38)
16. Please Please Me (1:37)
17. Ask Me Why (2:15)
18. Some Other Guy (2:06)
19. Presenter (0:18)
20. Love Me Do (2:16)
21. Keep Your Hands off My Baby (2:29)
22. Beautiful Dreamer (1:53)
23. Ask Me Why (2:21)
24. Ray Peters (0:18)
25. Misery (1:48)
26. Ray Peters (0:12)
27. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:52)
28. Ray Peters (0:22)
29. Please Please Me (1:57)
30. Warmed Over Kisses (Ben Richmond) (2:28)
31. I Saw Her Standing There (2:35)
32. Chat (0:44)
33. Misery (1:49)
34. Too Much Monkey Business (1:50)
35. I'm Talking About You (1:52)
36. Chat (0:52)
37. Please Please Me (1:52)
38. The Hippy Hippy Shake (1:43)
39. Gerry Marsden And Brian Matthew (0:40)
40. From Me To You (1:54)
41. Going Up (1:55)
42. Peter Pilbeam Talks About The Beatles Radio Debut (2:17)
43. Bernie Andrews & Brian Matthew Recall Saturday Club (2:33)
44. Brian Matthew Talks About The Live Saturday Club (0:53)
45. Keep Your Hands Off My Baby (Alternate Source) (2:28)
46. Beautiful Dreamer (Alternate Source) (1:22)
47. Closedown (1:57)

Vol.2
1. Tonight On The Light (0:38)
2. Twist And Shout (2:08)
3. From Me To You (2:22)
4. Chat (1:15)
5. Chat (0:21)
6. Long Tall Sally (1:49)
7. Chat (0:22)
8. A Taste of Honey (2:05)
9. Chains (2:25)
10. Chat (0:22)
11. Thankyou Girl (2:02)
12. Chat (0:12)
13. Boys (1:54)
14. Side By Side (The Beatles And The Karl Denver Trio) (0:51)
15. John Dunn (0:04)
16. Too Much Monkey Business (2:08)
17. Chat (0:15)
18. Boys (2:31)
19. When Day Is Done (The Karl Denver Trio) (2:57)
20. Chat (0:31)
21. I'll Be On My Way (2:07)
22. From Me To You (1:56)
23. Brian Matthew (0:04)
24. I Saw Her Standing There (2:53)
25. Chat (0:25)
26. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:48)
27. Boys (2:32)
28. Chat (0:18)
29. Long Tall Sally (1:45)
30. Chat (0:12)
31. From Me To You (1:52)
32. Money (2:14)
33. Please Please Me (1:59)
34. I Saw Her Standing There (2:58)
35. Lee Peters (0:04)
36. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby (2:02)
37. Chat (0:17)
38. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:47)
39. Chat (0:22)
40. You Really Got A Hold On Me (2:53)
41. Misery (1:44)
42. Chat (0:19)
43. The Hippy Hippy Shake (1:43)
44. Terry Henebery Talks About Pop Go The Beatles (3:54)
45. George Talks About Terry Henebery (0:35)
46. George Talks About BBC Sessions (1:47)
47. Goodnight (0:20)

Vol.3
1. For The Girl Back Home (0:21)
2. Too Much Monkey Business (1:47)
3. Chat (0:29)
4. I Got To Find My Baby (2:00)
5. Lee Peters (0:22)
6. Youngblood (1:58)
7. Lee Peters (0:10)
8. Till There Was You (2:12)
9. Chat (0:28)
10. Baby It's You (2:48)
11. Who Is Harry (0:23)
12. Lee Peters (0:09)
13. Love Me Do (2:21)
14. Pop Go The Beatles (long vsn) (1:11)
15. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:20)
16. Lee Peters (0:21)
17. A Shot of Rhythm And Blues (2:04)
18. Chat (0:45)
19. Memphis Tennessee (2:17)
20. Chat (0:44)
21. A Taste of Honey (1:54)
22. Lee Peters (0:10)
23. Sure To Fall (2:11)
24. Greenback Dollar (Carter Lewis And The Southerners) (0:58)
25. Lee Peters (0:08)
26. Money (2:45)
27. Chat (0:10)
28. From Me To You (1:51)
29. Some Other Guy (2:01)
30. Chat (0:30)
31. A Taste of Honey (2:00)
32. Thankyou Girl (2:08)
33. Brian Matthew (0:26)
34. From Me To You (1:59)
35. I Saw Her Standing There (2:58)
36. Chat (0:21)
37. Anna (3:00)
38. Chat (0:30)
39. Chat (0:36)
40. Boys (2:28)
41. Chat (0:27)
42. Chains (2:15)
43. Lee Peters (0:07)
44. Faraway Places (The Bachelors) (2:27)
45. Chat (The Bachelors) (0:25)
46. Jailor Bring Some Water (The Bachelors) (2:06)
47. Chat (0:14)
48. Ps I Love You (2:01)
49. Chat (0:40)
50. Twist And Shout (2:24)
51. Lee Peters (0:10)
52. Pop Go The Beatles (long vsn) (1:10)
53. A Taste of Honey (1:53)
54. Twist And Shout (2:27)
55. Keith Bateson Talks About Pop Go The Beatles (1:08)
56. Memphis Tennessee (Incomplete Alt Source) (0:48)
57. The End of The Day (2:07)

Vol.4
1. Music And Fun (0:14)
2. I Got To Find My Baby (1:57)
3. Chat (0:36)
4. Memphis Tennessee (2:19)
5. Money (2:30)
6. Till There Was You (2:13)
7. Chat (0:28)
8. From Me To You (1:52)
9. Roll Over Beethoven (2:29)
10. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:18)
11. Rodney Burke (0:13)
12. That's All Right Mama (2:56)
13. Chat (0:53)
14. There's A Place (1:52)
15. Rodney Burke (0:11)
16. I Got A Woman (Graham Bond) (2:39)
17. Cabbage Greens (Graham Bond) (2:31)
18. Rodney Burke (0:11)
19. Carol (2:35)
20. Chat (0:30)
21. Soldiers of Love (2:02)
22. Rodney Burke (0:09)
23. I Saw Her Standing There (Graham Bond) (2:24)
24. Spanish Blues (Graham Bond) (2:56)
25. Rodney Burke (0:10)
26. Lend Me Your Comb (1:48)
27. Chat (0:31)
28. Clarabella (2:48)
29. I Saw Her Standing There (2:40)
30. A Shot of Rhythm And Blues (2:12)
31. There's A Place (1:51)
32. Twist And Shout (2:28)
33. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:18)
34. Chat (0:20)
35. Sweet Little Sixteen (2:24)
36. Chat (0:10)
37. A Taste of Honey (1:59)
38. Rodney Burke (0:04)
39. Nothin' Shakin' (3:01)
40. Rodney Burke (0:19)
41. Love Me Do (2:30)
42. Chat (0:10)
43. Lonesome Tears In My Eyes (2:35)
44. Rodney Burke (0:05)
45. Mad Mad World (Carter Lewis) (1:57)
46. Chat (0:08)
47. So How Come No One Loves Me (1:54)
48. Chat (0:10)
49. Pop Go The Beatles (long vsn) (1:10)
50. Paul Reminisces (5:05)
51. Ringo Reminisces (1:21)
52. Review of The Week (0:31)

Vol.5
1. Right now... (0:06)
2. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:18)
3. Rodney Burke (0:12)
4. Memphis Tennessee (2:17)
5. Chat (0:37)
6. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:47)
7. Rodney Burke (0:11)
8. Sweets For My Sweet (The Searchers) (2:21)
9. Chat (0:43)
10. Till There Was You (2:16)
11. Chat (0:27)
12. Matchbox (1:59)
13. Rodney Burke (0:28)
14. Please Mr Postman (2:16)
15. Rodney Burke (0:05)
16. Da Doo Run Run (The Searchers) (2:23)
17. Rodney Burke (0:06)
18. The Hippy Hippy Shake (1:50)
19. Rodney Burke (0:16)
20. Pop Go The Beatles (Long vsn) (0:24)
21. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:18)
22. Rodney Burke (0:13)
23. I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You) (2:07)
24. Chat (0:32)
25. Crying, Waiting, Hoping (2:12)
26. Kansas City (2:39)
27. Rodney Burke (0:04)
28. To Know Her Is To Love Her (2:56)
29. Chat (Swinging Blue Jeans) (0:36)
30. It's Too Late Now (Swinging Blue Jeans) (1:45)
31. Chat (0:50)
32. The Honeymoon Song (1:41)
33. Twist And Shout (2:27)
34. Rodney Burke (0:10)
35. Pop Go The Beatles (Long vsn) (0:24)
36. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:18)
37. Rodney Burke (0:14)
38. Long Tall Sally (2:01)
39. Rodney Burke (0:16)
40. Please Please Me (1:56)
41. Rodney Burke (0:39)
42. She Loves You (2:19)
43. Rodney Burke (0:23)
44. You Really Got A Hold On Me (3:00)
45. Rodney Burke (0:06)
46. Searchin' (The Hollies) (2:19)
47. Rodney Burke (0:10)
48. I'll Get You (2:02)
49. I Got A Woman (2:48)
50. Rodney Burke (0:14)
51. Pop Go The Beatles (Long vsn) (0:24)
52. She Loves You (2:19)
53. Rodney Burke (0:26)
54. Words of Love (1:59)
55. Rodney Burke (0:08)
56. My Whole World Is Falling Down (Russ Sainty) (1:51)
57. Wipeout (Russ Sainty) (2:20)
58. Rodney Burke (0:05)
59. Glad All Over (1:52)
60. Rodney Burke (0:17)
61. I Just Don't Understand (2:55)
62. Rodney Burke (0:20)
63. Devil In Her Heart (2:22)
64. Rodney Burke (0:14)
65. Slow Down (2:40)
66. Sing Something Simple (0:29)
67. Unforgettable Love (Russ Sainty) (2:32)
68. Walkin' Tall (Russ Sainty) (2:08)
69. Da Doo Run Run (Russ Sainty) (2:21)



The Beatles - The BBC Archives 1962-1970 [5 Volumes] (2013) Lossless



Book Review: "The Beatles: The BBC Archives" by Kevin Howlett



It comes in a box


In this multi-platform, multi-device, thousand-channel age we live in, it must seem almost unbelievable to imagine an era when a national broadcasting system consisted of just three radio channels and two TV stations. But that was the set-up in Britain in 1962, when The Beatles made their first appearance on BBC Radio. By 1946 the British Broadcasting Corporation (the "Beeb") had reconfigured its radio operations into three nationwide stations: the Home Service (set up in 1939 as the channel focused on news, information, talk programmes, drama, and educational programmes for schools); the Light Programme (established in 1945 as the home for popular music and light entertainment); and the Third Programme (set up in 1946 as the purveyor of classical music and "high-brow" culture). 

  
BBC Radio recording studio at Paris Theatre in Lower Regent Street


The BBC - a non-commercial public broadcaster - had been granted total control of the radio airwaves in Britain by a Royal Charter on January 1st., 1927. Its mandate - according to the first managing director, John Reith - was to "inform, educate and entertain". Up until the late fifties, popular music on the radio (the "wireless" as it was called back then) was dominated by crooners and dance-bands. Most of this middle-of-the-road pop music was heard on the Light Programme. Rock 'n' Roll music was almost completely absent from the airwaves. Part of the problem was "needle time" - an agreement between the BBC and both the Musicians' Union and Phonographic Performance Limited (a performance-rights organization and music-licensing company set up in the UK by EMI and Decca in 1934). The agreement struck between them stipulated that the BBC could only play up to five hours of commercial gramophone records during each broadcast day. This meant that a lot of popular songs and pieces that had been released on records were heard on the BBC not in their original form, but interpreted by one of several in-house orchestras and bands - like the BBC Radio Orchestra and the Northern Dance Orchestra, based in Manchester. Middle-of-the-roads-ville!


The BBC Northern Dance Orchestra (based in Manchester) - rock 'n' roll it ain't!


So it was hard to get access to rock 'n' roll music back then. You might get to listen to new records at friends' houses; or people would bring their collection to a party; or you could listen to discs in the "browseries" at record shops - like Brian Epstein's NEMS record shop in Liverpool; or listen to them on a coffee shop jukebox; or blasting from a tinny loudspeaker at a seaside fairground.
It wasn't until the late fifties that the national broadcaster began to consider the kind of pop music that excited the kids. On weekdays in 1962 there was just one thirty-minute radio programme devoted to the rock 'n' roll sounds the teenagers were desperate to hear. These programmes - broadcast at 5 p.m. (soon after the kids were home from school) - were known collectively as Teenagers Turn. Each day's programme had a different title: the Thursday edition, for example, was known as Here We Go - recorded at the Playhouse Theatre in Manchester, under the production of Peter Pilbeam. It was on this programme that The Beatles made their radio debut on March 8th., 1962.


Lee Peters hosting Pop Go The Beatles - summer of 1963

The only ways for The Beatles to develop their popularity across the nation then - they still hadn't secured a recording contract - were through live stage performances and appearances on radio and television. The media work began slowly in 1962 - they did four radio shows that year - but by the time they had released their second hit single, in early 1963, they were in constant demand. And by the end of that year that had made almost 50 appearances on BBC radio. Once they hit their peak of this early fame - which the press soon dubbed Beatlemania - they were given their own radio series. Through the summer of 1963 they hosted Pop Go The Beatles, a fifteen-week run of thirty-minute programmes for which they would have to provide six songs per show. Of the 56 different songs they performed on Pop Go The Beatles, 26 of them were never released during their career. And so it went throughout their time on "the wireless". Between March 1962 and June 1965 they played 88 different songs on 53 radio programmes - a total of 275 musical performances. 36 of those songs were never released on record. But they are of tremendous interest, because many of them were staples of their live performances - cover versions which reveal some of the main influences on their style and repertoire. 


Chuck Berry was their favourite. They did nine of his songs. And - except for "Roll Over Beethoven", which featured George - John took lead vocals on all of them. They did six covers of Carl Perkins on Pop Go The Beatles. Perkins was one of George's favourites. They did four each of Elvis and Little Richard - interesting, because they recorded all of those Little Richard songs, but never covered Elvis on disc. They loved his early phase, but seemed to have become disenchanted with the post-army Elvis.



The legacy that The Beatles left to the BBC only really began to get its due in 1982. To honour the twentieth anniversary of the band's first radio broadcast (March 8, 1962), BBC producers Jeff Griffin and Kevin Howlett put together a special programme called The Beatles at the Beeb. They managed to dig up from various different sources tapes and records (from BBC Transcription recordings released to radio stations around the World) that included songs and voice-only interludes featuring the Fab Four in playful conversation with various well-known BBC "comperes" (hosts) of the period. The response to this one-off special was so favourable that Howlett returned to the source material in 1988 - by then a lot more material was unearthed - and produced a series of 14 half-hour shows called The Beeb's Lost Beatles Tapes. And then in November 1994 a double-CD collection titled "The Beatles - Live at the BBC" was released. It contained 56 of the BBC sessions from the 60s, and sold five million copies in just six weeks.

Howlett's first book about the Fab Four at the BBC (radio only)

After the success of the first radio special - The Beatles at the Beeb - Kevin Howlett prepared a modest book to accompany the programme. Published by the BBC in 1982, the book - also called The Beatles at the Beeb - tells "the story of their radio career 1962-65". The first section of the book describes their radio work at the BBC during those four frenetic years. The second section provides information and commentaries about the 88 songs they performed on radio - the most important part of the book for serious fans. And the final part charts the dates and details of the individual programmes. I picked up a copy of The Beatles at the Beeb when it was first released. It's a small, 128-page paperback, but packed with precious and little-known - at that time - details about a very important element of the band's career.

 From 1982 we flash forward to November, 2013 - a second double-CD of Beatles radio recordings was released, called On Air - Live at the BBC, Volume Two. But more importantly, the CD release was coordinated with the publication of a new book by Kevin Howlett. This one is titled The Beatles: The BBC Archives 1962-1970, a lavishly-illustrated, 336-page hardcover published by Harper Design. In addition to fleshing out the material covered in his first book, in this volume Howlett documents their performances on BBC-TV and the non-performing appearances - mostly interviews - on both radio and TV in the late 60s. It's a comprehensive and detailed account - clearly the definitive treatment of the subject.

The Beatles with BBC Radio producer Bernie Andrews


Any fan of The Beatles who grew up through the 1960s listening to BBC Radio, and recognizes the names of programmes like Saturday Club625 SpecialTop of the Pops, and recalls the names of hosts like Brian Matthew, Alan Freeman, Rodney Burke, Lee Peters, and David Jacobs will get a lot of pleasure out of this book. Newcomers to this aspect of the Fab Four's career might also find this day-by-day, week-by-week story of their work on BBC  Radio and TV of interest. 


The main body of the text consists of nine chapters - one for each year running between 1962 and 1970. Each chapter begins with an introductory essay that summarizes the main social and political events of the year; that's followed by a full account of how The Beatles and the Beeb interacted that year; and the chapter concludes with precise details about each radio or TV programme they appeared on (date of recording, date and time of broadcast and rebroadcast, and channel of transmission). It's a complete inventory.

BBC Radio audition in Manchester (Stuart Sutcliffe on bass; Pete Best on drums)


How did it all begin? The Beatles travelled to Manchester for their first audition with BBC Radio on February 12, 1962. They performed McCartney's "Like Dreamers Do", Lennon's "Hello Little Girl", and covers of "Memphis, Tennessee" and "'Til There Was You". Producer Peter Pilbeam wrote this astute comment about the band on the official BBC audition form: "an unusual group, not as "Rocky" as most, more C&W, with a tendency to play music." About the relative merits of the prime vocalists, he wrote: "John Lennon - Yes; Paul McCartney - No."


Having passed that formal appraisal from Mr. Pilbeam, The Beatles returned to Manchester on March 7th., 1962 and were recorded live in front of a studio audience at the Playhouse Theatre. They wore their new suits for the first time. John did "Memphis, Tennessee" again, and The Marvelettes' "Please Mr. Postman"; Paul did Roy Orbison's "Dream Baby". The performance went well and was broadcast the next day. Pilbeam booked them for two more shows in 1962 - broadcast on June 15th. and October 26th. By the time of that last appearance in Manchester, they had a new single to promote ("Love Me Do") and a new drummer, replacing Pete Best.


"Some Other Guy" - The Beatles filmed by Granada TV at The Cavern


The Beatles' first performance in front of TV cameras happened at The Cavern in Liverpool on August 22nd., 1962. But it wasn't filmed by the Beeb. Granada Television, the regional station in north-west England that was affiliated with ITV (Independent Television - a commercial alternative to the BBC), recorded the lunchtime show on Mathew Street. The footage showed the band doing one of their standout songs - "Some Other Guy", with John and Paul doing a dual lead-vocal throughout. The performance was good, but the quality of the picture was not. Granada decided not to broadcast it at the time, but they unearthed the footage much later, after the band had made it very big - airing it first on November 6th., 1963. 
  


The Beatles did their first audition with BBC-TV on November 23rd., 1962. They passed the audition with no problem, but they were so busy now, and the options for performances on BBC-TV were less numerous and more competitive than for the radio, that the band had already done 11 shows for ITV before they put in their first BBC appearance on the 625 Special on April 16, 1963. This discrepancy between the two TV systems continued throughout 1963: only 9 of their 36 TV appearances that year were on the Beeb's television channel.


Weekly guide to BBC Radio and TV


The Beatles started to make regular appearances in BBC's RadioTimes - the Beeb's weekly programming guide - on the cover and inside. The cover of one edition in December, 1963, promoted their appearance on the TV programme Juke Box Jury. It was their most significant TV gig for BBC-TV that year. Juke Box Jury was a very popular staple of Saturday-evening viewing. By 1963 it averaged about 10 million viewers per episode. Each week a new panel of four celebrities - usually from the world of entertainment - would hear excerpts from brand new 45 rpm records ("singles"). Each would then be asked to make a brief comment and vote on whether they thought the disc would be a "Hit" or a "Miss". Lennon had actually been on the programme before - without his bandmates - on June 29th. The jury was usually an eclectic mix of personalities; so it was a groundbreaking event to have all four members of the same pop group serving at the same time.



Posing as Juke Box Jury with host David Jacobs (7 December 1963)

Juke Box Jury was normally recorded in London at the BBC-TV Theatre in Shepherd's Bush Green, hosted by David Jacobs. For the special Beatles edition on December 7th., 1963, the programme was filmed at the Empire Theatre in Liverpool in front of an invited audience - members of The Beatles' Northern Area Fan Club. The show was a huge success - drawing an incredible viewership of 23 million - including me (11 yrs old)! Incredibly, in the early to mid-60s, the bulk of TV programmes filmed by the BBC, and most of the audio recordings done for the "wireless" were not saved. The film and tape were reused. The Beatles appearance on Juke Box Jury is gone - just a memory for people like me, who tuned in between 6:05 and 6:35 that early December evening.


"All You Need is Love" - and satellite transmission (25 June 1967)
Another memorable Beatles' event on BBC-TV was their appearance on the special "One World" telecast. It was the first TV programme to link five continents live via satellite. The two-hour programme was to contain short features from 14 contributing countries around the globe. The BBC wrote to Brian Epstein in February, 1967 explaining an idea that they had come up with for the British feature: "We would like to offer from Britain the subject of The Beatles at work ... in a recording studio making a disc." The band agreed. An remote broadcast was organised from EMI's Abbey Road - Studio One. Lennon wrote (or finished, perhaps) a song just for the occasion - "All You Need Is Love". The band prepared a basic rhythm track; for the broadcast Lennon sang the lead vocal live (nonchalantly chewing gum at the same time) to the pre-recorded track, and the group was accompanied by a symphony orchestra. The historic broadcast took place on June 25th., 1967 - at the height of the "summer of love". An estimated global audience of 500 million people watched this first significant use of satellite broadcasting.


The Beatles with ubiquitous BBC Radio host Brian Matthew


By 1964 BBC Radio was being hard-pressed by the "pirate stations" - commercial radio enterprises that were set up on boats in the North Sea and English Channel, just beyond the territorial limits and the control of the British government. Radio Caroline was the first, but lots more floating stations followed. BBC executives realized that they had to respond to the demographic shift. They could not continue to limit "pop groups" (rock 'n' roll bands) to a few brief radio programmes, and the occasional spin of a hit record on Childrens' Favourites (with Uncle Mac), Housewives' Choice, and Two-Way Family Favourites. Bernie Andrews, one of the Beeb's more forward-thinking radio producers of pop music programming, had been pushing for a late-night pop show. He was finally recruited to establish such a show. It was called Top Gearand it would be hosted by the affable and ubiquitous Brian Matthew. The programme featured straight rock music, not a bland middle-of-the-road mixture of "light entertainment". The Beatles appeared on the very first edition of Top Gear on July 16th., 1964. They engaged in some typical repartee with the host. One of the topics of discussion was the band's songwriting. And it came up that Ringo was now attempting to pen a song - at which point Paul breaks into the opening lyric of "Don't Pass Me By", a country-flavoured ditty not recorded by the band until four years later for the "White Album". Another interesting titbit from Top Gear (this from November, 1964) reveals a never-to-be broken policy of the band to keep singles and albums as separate entities. Brian Matthew muses about the group releasing tracks from an album as singles. John quickly corrects him: "You can't release singles off an LP after the LP has been out." Brian responds: "A lot of people do." But not The Beatles. It did become de rigueur in the 70s, however, to exploit a hugely successful album by releasing three or four of the tracks later as singles.


A vinyl LP from the BBC Transcription Service
 Amongst the many radio and TV interviews transcribed for this book, there are four that Matthew did for the BBC Transcription Service. This division of the Corporation was set up in the mid-1930s in order to distribute British culture to the Empire and, later, the Commonwealth. BBC offices were set up in countries all around the World. Radio stations in those countries could buy the rights to broadcast BBC Radio programmes (music, comedy, current affairs, drama, etc.) twice within a limited period. These programmes were shipped to the interested stations on discs - shellac 78s in the early days, and then vinyl LPs. In the mid-60s Brian Matthew began interviewing rock stars for the Transcription Service. They were given the old-fashioned name of Pop Profiles. He talked to John and George in November, 1965, and then did the same with Paul and Ringo in May, 1966. These interviews have recently been released in their entirety on the double-CD BBC release On Air - Live at the BBC, Volume Two.

One interesting, and amusing, feature that runs through this book are samples provided of detailed Audience Research Reports. After most significant programmes - on both the Radio and TV services - a department at the Beeb would do comprehensive research about the audience's reaction. This research was not restricted to the demographic that one might expect that programme to be aimed at. Media back then were not "narrow-casting"; they were doing true broadcasting. All sorts of age-groups and many different social types would be listening to what the BBC was offering.


Here's a choice example. The Beatles made their 53rd. and final musical broadcast for BBC Radio on May 26th., 1965. It was heard later on June 7th., Whit Monday - a Bank Holiday - on a show called The Beatles Invite You to Take a Ticket to Ride. Did everyone by now just love the Fab Four? About 25% of the audience were characterized as negatively disposed to the entertainment on offer. They described pop music, in general, as "ghastly", "insane", and "jungle music". The Beatles tracks, in particular, were dismissed as "monotonous bangings". As one listener expostulated: "Oh, the deadly monotony of this kind of music!"

The affable Brian Matthew again - host of Easy BeatSaturday ClubTop Gear


The interviews - both individual and group - featured in this book show a steady change in tone and content. In the early days the band were playful, cheeky, and irreverent. The between-song banter with the radio hosts was full of laughs and send-ups. This was new, at the time, and very refreshing. Most of the interview snippets heard on the two double-CD sets of BBC radio performances are of this type (except thePop Profiles material I mentioned earlier). But as time went on, especially after the band stopped touring and stopped performing live on radio and TV, the interviews (more often done as solo conversations with individual Beatles) became more thoughtful, decidedly serious - and sometimes, even, a bit weary. Two interesting examples of this tendency stand out for me in this book.


Victor Spinetti discussing The Lennon Play:In His Own Write
There is a fascinating dual interview done by Peter Lewis with John Lennon and Victor Spinetti for the BBC2 TV programme Release. Spinetti has the distinction of appearing as an actor in all three Beatles' films - A Hard Day's NightHelp! andMagical Mystery Tour. Amazing, really! He was also involved with a 1968 National Theatre production called The Lennon Play: In His Own Write, a dramatized version of material from Lennon's two books of surreal and absurdist writings called In His Own Write and A Spaniard in the Works. The interview revolves around John's fascination with how well the dramatization catches the mood and meaning of his acerbic work. With his typical lack of restraint, Lennon declares at one point: "I think our society is run by insane people for insane objectives."


And then there are excerpts from a BBC Radio 1 programme called Scene and Heard, hosted by David Wigg. Ten of its editions in 1969 featured Wigg in conversations with each of the individual Beatles. The talk is relaxed and each of the soon-to-be-ex-Beatles is candid about their current opinions, and the state of their relationships with each other. The best of this material was released on vinyl in 1976 by Polydor Records as The Beatles Tapes - a double album sporting an all-black cover with sparse white lettering. It could be called "The Black Album"! Of course, I bought it back then, as soon as it came out - adding it to my quickly-expanding Beatles collection of recordings, movies and books.

They were even on Grandstand!

Here are a few other things covered in the book that I found of interest. When The Beatles made their historic first visit to the U.S. - primarily to appear on the Ed Sullivan Show - Brian Matthew phoned them soon after their arrival in New York City on February 8th., 1964.. The interview - done via the trans-Atlantic telephone cable - was aired on Saturday Club.  The band returned to the U.K. on February 22nd. It happened to be early on a Saturday morning. For BBC-TV, Saturday afternoons were devoted to sports programming; from 1:00 - 5:15 they would broadcast Grandstand, hosted by the versatile David Coleman. On that particular Saturday, Coleman had been dispatched to Heathrow airport at 7:00 a.m., in order to greet the band and interview them exclusively for BBC-TV. So there they were, at the beginning of that week's Grandstand broadcast talking to a sports journalist about their triumphant visit to The States. In the midst of this exuberant interview, Coleman asked the lads if they supported Liverpool Football Club (what about Everton, David?). Paul - on behalf of "plastic fans" everywhere - declared: "We support whoever's winning all the time." Speaking of sports, The Beatles concert at Shea Stadium, in Queens, New York City, on August 15th., 1965, was eventually broadcast on BBC-TV 1 on March 1st., 1966. The production team cheated with the sound - bringing in the band to CTS Studios in London, in order to do some post-production overdubs.

First and last appearance on Top of the Pops - miming to "Paperback Writer" and "Rain"
BBC-TV's flagship pop-music programme was the weekly Top of the Pops. It had been running every Thursday evening since January 1st., 1964. The Beatles had never appeared live on the show - for their most-recent singles they had supplied the programme with filmed performances. But finally they did do the show - miming to both sides on their new "Paperback Writer / Rain" single. Coincidentally, it was not only their first live appearance, it was also their last; in fact, it turned out to be their last "performance" on a TV pop programme.


"I Am the Walrus" from Magical Mystery Tour

The Beatles ran afoul of the BBC censors twice during their career. The first time was when the track "A Day in the Life" (from Sgt. Pepper) was banned from airplay because of the refrain "I'd love to turn you on." There was an interesting exchange of letters between the "brass" at the Beeb and Sir Joseph Lockwood, the Chairman of EMI Records - the company that owned Parlophone, The Beatles recording label. [The only other track banned outright during the 60s was "We Love the Pirates" by The Roaring 60s. It was a single released in 1966 as a protest against government plans to outlaw pirate radio stations broadcasting into Britain from outside its territorial waters. It was the popularity of the pirate stations, by the way, which led to the establishment in September, 1967 of BBC Radio 1 - a channel devoted, unlike the Light Programme, almost entirely to pop music]  The ban against "A Day in the Life" continued into the early 70s. The other Beatles track banned by the BBC Controller was "I Am the Walrus". He thought that the line "Boy, you been a naughty girl, you let your knickers down" was unacceptable. The song was recorded for The Beatles self-produced film Magical Mystery Tour in late-1967. Interestingly enough, it was that same BBC Controller who negotiated with Paul McCartney (in the absence of the late-Brian Epstein) the rights to broadcast the film on BBC-TV 1 on Boxing Day, 1967. Despite some good music featured in it, the rather experimental and surrealistic film did not meet the "light entertainment" expectation for early-evening Boxing Day viewing.  The programme got a critical drubbing - probably the worst reception ever given to a major project undertaken by the band. The fact that the psychedelically-charged film was shown on BBC 1 in black-and-white probably didn't help. It was rebroadcast on BBC 2 in colour ten days later - not that that did much to improve the majority opinion. The Beeb's Audience Research Report said that 75% of people had a negative reaction. A typical quote from the report: "It was a complete jumble, with no shape or meaning."


In addition to the main text, The Beatles: The BBC Archives (1962-1970) is appended with a 10-page detailed section of broadcast information and commentaries on all the songs performed by The Beatles on BBC Radio or TV. This section includes five pages of pictures of LP and single covers by the artists who did the original recordings.

Detailed info in the book about all the songs the band performed on BBC Radio and TV
There is also a brief, but important, essay at the back of the book which outlines how the producers and engineers recorded The Beatles for radio broadcast - and how their methods differed from the way things were done at EMI's Abbey Road studios. When The Beatles were recording for the BBC, for example, they didn't have a lot of time. EMI gave them three hours to do two songs. At the BBC it was six songs in as little as ninety minutes. There was no multi-tracking at the BBC, which used mono tape recorders. They could do occasional overdubs - or "cut in" an instrumental solo that was impossible to do live (George Martin's keyboard solo in "A Hard Day's Night", for example). And they often spliced together the best sections of different takes - so a song might be made up of three different takes of a  song. This sort of editing was a specialty of Bernie Andrews. Most recordings, though, were done live - direct to tape. And, occasionally, the band was forced to perform live to air - which never seemed to bother them. 

Bernie Andrews manipulating tape in the BBC Radio production studio




A lot of experimenting was done with microphone placement. The drums were recorded with ribbon mics. Sometimes the ribbons would break when the sounds got excessively loud. They put a 4033 mic - dubbed the "gin bottle" - right inside the bass drum. To get vocals from Ringo they had to suspend a cylindrical, silver-coloured C12 microphone (12" long, 2" in diameter) from elastic strings - they didn't have the modern steel booms to hold mics suspended over large distances. For vocals and guitars they generally used condenser mics, in order to get a fresh, bright sound. Guitar amps had microphones dangled in front of the speaker cabinets - attached from the amps' handles! They experimented with reverb, and were able to exploit the natural echo generated inside the cavernous Paris Theatre in Lower Regent Street. Whatever it took to improve the sound, and obtain some interesting effects - Bernie Andrews was willing to give it a try.


The complete package: book, glossy photo and facsimile documents






 The Beatles: The BBC Archives (1962-1970) by Kevin Howlett is published by Harper Design (2013). It contains 32 years of history into the BBC Beatles' broadcasts. The 336-page, hardcover book comes in a box cover shaped like a film canister. The pages have a 10" x 10" design. The book is lavishly illustrated with wonderful photographs of the band at the Beeb with the likes of Brian Matthew, Bernie Andrews, Alan Freeman, and David Jacobs. Included in the box, with the book, is a beautiful 9" x 9" glossy black-and-white photograph of the band, suitable for framing. There are also facsimiles of key documents related to the band's BBC career:

·        a 4-page audition report for BBC Manchester by Peter Pilbeam
·        a two-page Audience Research Report from 1964
·        It's The Beatles! programme sheet
·     a note from John about hearsay he had heard that the TV show Release, featuring interviews with him and Victor Spinetti, had been cut
·    the letter to Sir Joseph Lockwood at EMI from BBC brass about their decision to ban "A Day in the Life" because of the drug reference
·        a two-page Audience Research Report from December, 1967 about Magical Mystery Tour


The Beatles: The BBC Archives (1962-1970) is a unique and definitive work. Much of the material found here has been released before in other formats - but this project collects all of this related stuff together in a well-organized and beautifully-illustrated book. It fills a particular niche - probably of more real interest to Beatles' fans who grew up during the 60s in the grip of the Beeb and all her multifarious works. It would be a fascinating eye-opener, though, for those new to the scene, who would like to explore what it's like to live in a more closed and conservative society - in which the media are limited, very tightly controlled, and, therefore, of enormous influence. The Beatles not only took advantage of this narrow and concentrated scene to advance their career; they also helped to loosen its rigid and autocratic grip.  




In the BBC Radio studio - pointing at the BBC logo

Source: http://clive-w.blogspot.com/2014/10/book-review-beatles-bbc-archives-by.html



Posted on November 10, 2013

Our resident Beatles BBC tracks expert, Tom Frangione, offers this look at what’s still missing …

While the majority of the Beatles-reading world is savoring the long awaited first installment of Mark Lewisohn’s trilogy, avid students of the group are pulling double-duty thanks to Kevin Howlett’s remarkable book “The Beatles: The BBC Archives.”

Appearing almost simultaneously with the arrival of the second legally sanctioned collection of the Beatles’ historic radio performances, “On Air: Live at the BBC – Volume 2,” it makes for a fitting opportunity to examine the treasure trove of tracks that comprise this vital component of the band’s recording and performance legacy.

Beyond the two double-disc releases from Apple, there’s a wealth of material that’s circulated among collectors (including John Lennon) for over four decades. The most celebrated collection of these releases, “The Complete BBC Sessions,” appeared in 1993 on the European label Great Dane. The nine-disc set was lavishly packaged and collected all of the known circulating BBC recordings made by the group. While these had been scattered and largely misidentified over the years, scholarly research by Lewisohn, Howlett and others led to the production of radio specials in the early 1980s to commemorate the then-20th anniversary of The Beatles’ first appearances at the Beeb (as the British lovingly refer to their native radio service). This led to renewed interest among collectors and the emergence of additional tapes (many of substantially improved fidelity) and the ensuing proliferation of bootleg releases and vastly expanded radio productions.

The appearance of the Great Dane set drew notice outside of Beatles and record collecting circles, and was even reviewed in the New York Times. There’s little debate this helped nudge Apple/EMI to issue their own authorized selection of these performances in 1994.

Examining the track list of the Great Dane set, only 43 of the 275 songs performed by The Beatles on BBC radio went unrepresented, the recordings presumably lost to the ages. But the story doesn’t end there.

In the wake of the renewed interest in the BBC archives, a 10th bonus disc appeared, containing a previously uncirculated recording of the April 12, 1963, program “Here We Go,” featuring high-fidelity versions of the band’s complete three-song performance. Subsequent “upgraded” collections, most notably on the Purple Chick and Yellow Dog labels, provided over a dozen more, bringing the list of those “missing in action to just 27 songs. For fans and collectors, it’s no small relief that none of the 27 are titles that are otherwise unavailable, but rather are additional performances of songs already released or otherwise circulating.

“Unsurpassed Broadcasts,” the newest such collection of the “complete” BBC canon, collects all but the missing 27, together with some interviews, in-studio sessions and other BBC programming on 13 CDs. A parallel box set, “Live at the BBC 1962-1968,” mirrors the 13-disc set and adds two bonus DVDs of BBC-related material. For now, that’s as good as it’s going to get.


So, to help you keep tabs of all this, the right-hand column of the above chart indicates the ones that got away. (Click on the chart to make it bigger.)

As we’ve seen over the past 20 years, the list of missing performances was cut from 43 to 27, so there’s always hope. Where certain “full shows” are unrepresented in any form (the earliest 1962 broadcasts and peculiarly 4/22/63, for example), it’s less likely that tapes will surface. But, interestingly, many of the missing songs emanate from shows for which recordings do indeed exist. Check out 1/29/63 and 3/28/63 for example, where parts of the missing reels have turned up. An even more compelling case can be made for hopes that several of the songs that appear as one-offs on the list might one day come to light, as most come from shows where The Beatles performed up to a half dozen songs!

Twenty seven more to go. Since they pretty much run two to two and a half minutes, we’re less than a full CD away. Keep the faith!

And, by all means, share ’em if you got ’em!

— Tom Frangione

Source: https://beatlefansomethingnew.wordpress.com/2013/11/10/the-beatles-at-the-beeb-by-the-numbers/




This has always been a favorite concert of mine due to the amount of energy in their performance. The evening concert in Paris took place on the same day as the previous post: January 16 1964. The Beatles would play several concerts as the touring years continued. The venue in question for this particular performance is at the Olympia Theatre, Paris, France.

This performance included an audience of the so-called "upper class" (in those days) and so the reception for the band is not as enthusiastic as would appear in the afternoon show in front of students. The show was recorded and edited for radio broadcast three days later. The radio show was entitled "Musicorama" and the radio personnel were from Europe 1.
The tunes that we hear on the bootlegs start with the first version of the single "From Me To You" followed by a rendition of the current (for then) B-side of the latest single "This Boy". After the B-side is performed, the A-side follows in the form of "I Want To Hold Your Hand"; John singing the B-side and shared vocals between John and Paul for the A-side. The previous single is performed in the form of "She Loves You".  The Beatles then play the cover tune from the first LP "Twist And Shout" before reprising "From Me To You" once again.

An upgraded tape of the show includes the Paul vocal for the Little Richard cover "Long Tall Sally" and finally the show ends with an instrumental version of "From Me To You" (odd that this was played three times during a concert). There you have it.

You can find this show on bootleg LP with the title "A Paris". It's quite a nice package with a gatefold cover and a mini booklet inside. There is also a CD version of the show entitled "Live In Paris 1964 And In San Francisco 1966". Both of these boots include the show up to the second reprise of "From Me to You".






Tracklist
Live At Palais Des Sports, Paris, 1.8.1965 (Afternoon Show)
1     Twist And Shout
2     She's A Woman
3     Can't Buy Me Love
4     I'm A Loser
5     I Wanna Be Your Man
6     A Hard Day's Night
7     Baby's In Black
8     Rock And Roll Music
9     Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby
10     I Feel Fine
11     Ticket To Ride
12     Long Tall Sally
   
Live At Palais Des Sports, Paris, 1.8.1965 (Evening Show)
13     Twist And Shout
14     She's A Woman
15     I'm A Loser
16     Can't Buy Me Love
17     Baby's In Black
18     I Wanna Be Your Man
19     A Hard Day's Night
20     Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby
21     Rock And Roll Music
22     I Feel Fine
23     Ticket To Ride
24     Long Tall Sally



You can find more information here;
http://octaner.blogspot.com/2014/11/live-in-paris-1964-in-san-francisco-1966.html
and
http://vivalesbootlegs.blogspot.com/2010/01/beatles-live-in-paris-1965-palais-des.html

You can listen to the whole 57 minute concert here:
http://www.mixcloud.com/sinlopez/the-beatles-1965-06-20-palais-des-sports-paris-france-two-shows/







As a special treat for Christmas, I've posted the Beatles Christmas Messages recordings. 
Below are details on each of the recordings and their audio to enjoy. These bring back fond memories.



Each year from 1963 through 1969, the Beatles recorded a special Christmas greeting for their fans. The Official Beatles Fan Club in England sent flexi-discs containing the Christmas messages to its members each holiday season.The American fan club, Beatles (U.S.A.) Ltd., was established in 1964, and for their first Christmas, the American fan club sent fans the 1963 Christmas message on a soundcard, which is like a flexi-disc, but is "printed" on the post card that is mailed. No message was sent to the American fans in 1965 because the tape was not received on time.[Read more →] The Beatles Christmas flexis are very rare, and sell, in excellent condition, anywhere from $200 to $500.


These recordings offer a unique time-capsule glimpse into the personalities and evolution of the Beatles from 1963 through 1969. In the early years, like their appearances in A Hard Day’s Night, even though these messages were scripted by “somebody’s bad hand-wroter” (their Press Agent Tony Barrow), the Beatle’s geniune wit and humor shines through, for example, in 1963, when as John mentions taking part in the Royal Variety show, the boys extemporaneously launch into a whistling version of God Save The Queen, or in 1964, when Paul mentions that they don’t really know where they’d be without the fans, John says, off-handedly, “In the Army, perhaps…”


For older Beatles fans who remember hearing these messages over the years, “these little bits of plastic” are a fond holiday tradition, while for younger Beatles fans they offer a whole new insight into a pop music phenomenon which might never be repeated.


We present the Beatles Christmas Records here as a Christmas present to you from the Internet Beatles Album. Happy Crimble!

1963-uk-cover.jpg 


1963
The Beatles Christmas Record
Released December 6, 1963
Recorded October 17, 1963
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Engineer: Norman Smith
Recorded after a session for I Want To Hold Your Hand and This Boy.
About 30,000 total copies were manufactured.
This recording was sent to US Fan Club members in 1964.









1964
Another Beatles Christmas Record
Released December 18, 1964
Recorded October 26, 1964
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Engineer: Norman Smith
The only Beatles Fan Club Christmas record that played at 45 RPM instead of 33 1/3 RPM.
Recorded on the same day that they recorded Honey Don’t for Beatles For Sale.
US Fan Club members received the 1963 Christmas message this year.








1965
The Beatles Third Christmas Record
Released December 17, 1965
Recorded November 8, 1965
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Engineer: Norman Smith
Recorded during the Rubber Soul sessions, on the same day they recorded Think For Yourself. Cover photo taken on November 1 during the taping of Granada-TV’s ‘The Music of Lennon and McCartney’.









1966
Pantomime (Everywhere It’s Christmas)
Released December 16, 1966
Recorded November 25, 1966
Recorded in the basement studio of Dick James Music in London
Mixed at Abbey Road, December 2, 1966. Produced by George Martin.
Cover designed by Paul.




Some of the historical info on this page is from the books The Beatles: A Day In The Life by Tom Schultheiss, The Beatles Day By Day by Mark Lewisohn and The Price Guide for the Beatles American Records by Perry Cox and Frank Daniels As the 60’s evolve, so do the Beatles, and so do their Christmas records.


The previous year, the Christmas message changed from scripted messages talking directly to the fans, to sketch comedy, mostly Paul’s idea, but enthusiastically joined in by the other three. 1967 brings a similar production, but as the members of the group start desiring to go their separate ways, this is also reflected in the Christmas records, as the final two years bring messages recorded in bits and pieces recorded separately by each Beatle and assembled together later.







1967
Christmas Time (Is Here Again)
Released December 15, 1967
Recorded November 28, 1967
EMI Abbey Road Studio 2
Produced by George Martin
Special guest: Victor Spinetti

The script was written earlier in the day by the band. Last Christmas record the Beatles recorded together as a group. Cover designed on November 29 by John and Ringo.

The song Christmas Time (Is Here Again) was later released on the Real Love single in 1995.







1968
Happy Christmas
Released December 20, 1968
Recorded in November, 1968 at John’s home in London, Paul’s home in London, in the back of Ringo’s van in Surrey, with George in America and at George’s house in Esher during rehearsals for the White Album.
Special guest: Tiny Tim.

Created by Radio 1 disc jockey Kenny Everett who edited together separately-recorded messages from John, Paul, George and Ringo, and inter-cut random fragments from the White Album.









1969
Happy Christmas 1969
Released December 19, 1969
Recorded in fall of 1969 at John and Yoko’s home in Ascot, Ringo’s home in Weybridge, Paul’s home in London, and the London offices of Apple.
Edited by Maurice Cole (Kenny Everett’s original name)
Cover designed by Ringo








Because the Beatles officially broke up in 1970, no Christmas message was prepared for that holiday season.



In early 1971, fan club members were sent an album on the Apple label containing all seven of the Christmas messages.
Pictured is the American version of the LP. The British LP entitled From Then To You included a reproduction of the cover of the 1963 Christmas record.



Along with Let It Be and Introducing The Beatles, this is one of the notoriously most heavily counterfeited of Beatles albums. Counterfeits can be identified by blurry cover photos and an indentation ring much larger than 1 1/2″.



Some of the historical info on this page is from the books The Beatles: A Day In The Life by Tom Schultheiss, The Beatles Day By Day by Mark Lewisohn and The Price Guide for the Beatles American Records by Perry Cox and Frank Daniels.


Thank you, Ringo. http://www.beatlesagain.com/




Source : http://www.ringofstars.ru/across/?p=2767





Below is my previous post of scans of the covers:
http://jfnmusicmemories.blogspot.com/2009/07/christmas-messages-covers.html

You can get the recordings here:

http://teenagedogsintrouble.blogspot.com/2009/12/very-merry-beatles-christmas.html





In November 1968, George Harrison released 'Wonderwall Music'. A soundtrack to an art film called 'Wonderwall' this predominantly Indian music collection was the first solo album to be released by a Beatle and also the first album on the newly formed Apple Records. George would continue to release albums on Apple (and EMI) through to 1975's soul-influenced 'Extra Texture (Read All About It)' touching on experimentalism with 'Electronic Sound', the magnificent triple album 'All Things Must Pass', the chart-topping 'Living In The Material World' and the, perhaps, less well-known 'Dark Horse'. This box brings all these eclectic albums together in one set that mirrors 2004's 'Dark Horse Years' box set and will contain a perfect bound book with a DVD. All albums have been remastered by Dhani Harrison and Paul Hicks and all will be packaged in high-quality card packs and all albums, apart from 'All Things Must Pass' and 'Living In The Material World' contain newly written notes by Kevin Howlett. The DVD contains a brand new, never before seen video which has been painstakingly overseen by Olivia Harrison and all packages contain new photos many never seen before.





George Harrison's first six solo albums are being reissued as a box set called George Harrison: The Apple Years 1968-75. Those albums, from his days on The Beatles' label Apple Records, were I think his strongest, most interesting records: Wonderwall Music, Electronic Sound, All Things Must Pass, Living in the Material World, Dark Horse and Extra Texture (Read All About It). Though I liked something about all the post-Beatles George Harrison records (there were 12), I found those first half-dozen records to be a window into a famous guitar player and songwriter we hardly knew.
Those first two albums, which he did while still a Beatle, were like very few albums out there in the world of pop in the late 1960s. Wonderwall, released in 1968, was a soundtrack album, the first album on Apple Records, and was a response to Harrison's time in Bombay. Electronic Sound was his explorations on a Moog synthesizer. All Things Must Pass is his masterpiece and highlighted Harrison as a prolific emotional songwriter.
His final three records on Apple were all strong. Today we have a bonus track from the reissue of Extra Texture (Read All About It), an alternate version of one of my favorite songs from that album, "This Guitar (Can't Keep from Crying)." The recording was done in 1992 as a demo for Eurythmics' Dave Stewart, who recorded electric guitar on it at the time. The song itself is a sequel of sorts to Harrison's masterful tune "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," a song recorded with The Beatles that featured a brilliant guitar solo from his buddy Eric Clapton. "This Guitar" is a reaction to poor and sometimes scathing reviews, including ones from Rolling Stone that Harrison received when he toured in 1974 ignoring his Beatles legacy in favor of Indian Classical music and his new music.
Learned to get up when I fall
Can even climb rolling stone walls
But this guitar can't keep from crying
This here guitar can feel quite sad
Can be high strung, sometimes get mad
Can't understand or deal with hate
Responds much better to love
For the reissue, this version of the song got overdubs from George's son Dhani Harrison on guitar, Ringo Starr on drums and Kara DioGuardi on vocals. Dhani Harrison also oversaw the reissues. All of the records have been remastered from the original analog tapes and feature bonus tracks, booklets and a DVD. The box set comes out on Sept. 23, but you can pre-order here.

Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/allsongs/2014/09/10/347156982/george-harrison-this-guitar-cant-keep-from-crying




San Francisco said goodbye on Thursday to Candlestick Park -- the stadium where the city's beloved Giants and 49ers celebrated some of their greatest triumphs.

The storied venue shut down after an evening concert by former Beatle Paul McCartney that finished around midnight. It will then be demolished to make way for a housing, retail and entertainment development.
The Stick, as it is known, opened more than 50 years ago and served as the home field for the 49ers and Giants. It hosted greats from both teams, including Joe Montana, Jerry Rice and Willie Mays, and was the site of The Catch -- Montana's touchdown pass to Dwight Clark to win the NFC championship game in January 1982 that sent the 49ers to their first Super Bowl.


The Giants played their last game at Candlestick in September 1999. The 49ers will play at a new stadium about 45 miles south starting this year.
Candlestick was also the site of a 1987 mass by Pope John Paul II and the Beatles' last live concert in 1966.

"Anyone you talk to about Candlestick Park is going to have mixed emotions about it: It's not a pleasant place physically. It gets windy and cold, but it's where the Giants and 49ers played for so many years," said Greg Breit, 50, before the concert's start. "There's so much history here. You can't deny it."
Fans savored the final event at The Stick by holding tailgate parties and taking snapshots of the stadium before the late-afternoon fog rolled in.


San Francisco police warned people attending Thursday's concert not to take any chairs or other mementos from the stadium, saying anyone caught with such items could face vandalism charges.


"We don't want people to be trying to take any pieces of Candlestick Park," officer Gordon Shyy told KGO-TV. "Just come enjoy the concert tonight and have a safe night."

Source: http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6221743/paul-mccartney-closes-san-franciscos-candlestick-park

You can hear this concert in full here:
http://tela.sugarmegs.org/MostListened.aspx


July 16, 2014 9:00 AM ET Ron Howard,Courtesy Imagine Entertainment When Ron Howard was 9 years old, he was already a national television star on The Andy Griffith Show – and there was only one thing he wanted for his next birthday. "The gift that I was begging for was a Beatle wig," he tells Rolling Stone with a laugh. "And on March 1st, 1964, that's what I got: the Beatle wig of my dreams."

Now the Academy Award-winning director is coming full circle with his Fab Four obsession, having signed on to direct and produce an authorized, as-yet-untitled documentary about the touring years of the band’s career (approx. 1960-1966), a period in which the Beatles crossed the globe, sparked Beatlemania and released several classic albums (including A Hard Day’s Night and Rubber Soul). For it, he will interview surviving members Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, as well as talk with Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison (wife of the late George Harrison).

"What's so compelling to me is the perspective that we have now, the chance to really understand the impact that they had on the world," Howard says. "That six-year period is such a dramatic transformation in terms of global culture and these remarkable four individuals, who were both geniuses and also entirely relatable. That duality is something that is going to be very interesting to explore."

Howard is joined by Nigel Sinclair, the Grammy-winning producer behind the documentaries George Harrison: Living in the Material World and No Direction Home: Bob Dylan, as well as the producers Brian Grazer (Apollo 13, Get on Up) and Scott Pascucci (George Harrison). They will have access to the vast archives of Apple Corps, the Beatles’ company, as well as incorporate fan-sourced amateur video footage to recreate previously unseen concerts. It's Howard’s second music documentary, following last year’s Jay-Z festival film Made in America.

"We are going to be able to take the Super 8 footage that we found, that was all shot silent. We'll not only be able to digitally repair a lot of that, but we've also been finding the original recordings," explains Howard. "We can now sync it up and create a concert experience so immersive and so engaging, I believe you're going to actually feel like you're somewhere in the Sixties, seeing what it was like to be there, feeling it and hearing it. And as a film director, that's a fantastic challenge."

Sinclair says the team has already unearthed some surprising footage from the Beatles’ final concert at San Francisco's Candlestick Park in 1966. "Their last concert in ’66, when they were probably the most famous people on the planet, [they] ended up carrying their own amps onstage. I think that’s almost emblematic of the charm of this story," he says. Also a longtime Beatles fan, he saw the band in Glasgow in 1964. "It was a memory to treasure."

The film will also explore the "multigenerational quality" of Beatles fandom, according to Howard. "I hope we find some of that in the footage," he says. "We may have a shot of a boy or a girl very early in their life at a concert, and then we may be able to find them today and talk to them, and talk to their grandchildren and see what their relationship is with the Beatles, and understand how multiple generations find tremendous value and relevance in their music."

The documentary is scheduled for a tentative late-2015 release, and Howard says he is eager to begin interviewing McCartney and Starr. Turns out, he has a history with his heroes; half of the band met him on the set of his hit 1970s sitcom Happy Days. "We got word that John Lennon wanted to come by and bring his son [Julian], and he was a big Fonzie fan. I managed to sneak in a picture," he recalls. "He was graciously cool, but mostly it was for his kid, which we all really appreciated."

Howard adds, chuckling, "A year or so later, Ringo and Keith Moon wandered by. I don't know what they were doing in the lot, and I'm not even sure they knew where they were, but they seemed happy to be there."

Source: Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ron-howard-directing-new-beatles-doc-focusing-on-bands-early-years-20140716#ixzz37w28bbfe
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook



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Los Angeles, July 16, 2014 – Apple Corps Ltd., White Horse Pictures and Imagine Entertainment have announced they will produce a new authorized documentary for Apple, based on the first part of The Beatles’ career -- the touring years. The film will be directed by Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard and will be produced with the full cooperation of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison. White Horse’s Grammy Award-winning Nigel Sinclair, Scott Pascucci and Academy Award winner and multiple nominee Brian Grazer of Imagine Entertainment will produce with Howard. Imagine’s Michael Rosenberg and White Horse’s Guy East will serve as executive producers.

Howard said, "I am excited and honored to be working with Apple and the White Horse team on this astounding story of these four young men who stormed the world in 1964. Their impact on popular culture and the human experience cannot be exaggerated."

This film will focus on The Beatles’ journey from the early days of the Cavern Club in Liverpool and engagements in Hamburg to their last public concert in Candlestick Park, San Francisco, in 1966.

The Beatles began touring Europe in late 1963, after an extraordinary arrival on the British scene in 1961 and ‘62. However, it was their much-heralded Ed Sullivan appearance on February 9, 1964 that caused The Beatles’ popularity to explode. By June, the band had commenced their first world tour, and continued on a relentless schedule for two subsequent years. By the time the band stopped touring in August of 1966, they had performed 166 concerts in 15 countries and 90 cities around the world. The cultural phenomenon their touring helped create, known as "Beatlemania," was something the world had never seen before and laid the foundation for the globalization of culture.

Beatlemania was not just a phenomenon. It was the catalyst for a cultural shift that would alter the way people around the world viewed and consumed popular culture. This film will seek to explain what it was about that particular moment in time that allowed this cultural pivot point to occur. It will examine the social and political context of the time, and reveal the unique conditions that caused technology and mass communication to collide. The film will also explore the incomparable electricity between performer and audience that turned the music into a movement – a common experience into something sublime.

Founded in London in 1968, Apple Corps Ltd. represents The Beatles. Under the direction of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison, the company administers The Beatles’ business interests, and it also develops new creative projects, making a significant contribution to the staging and safekeeping of The Beatles’ musical and cultural legacies. Jeff Jones and Jonathan Clyde will act as executive producers for Apple Corps.

Over the course of a near 30-year partnership, Howard and Grazer have produced a long list of successful and critically acclaimed films, including Apollo 13, Frost/Nixon, A Beautiful Mind – for which Howard won an Academy Award for Best Director and Grazer and Howard won Best Picture – and, most recently, Rush, and music-driven films like 8 Mile. This will be the second documentary for Howard -- the first being 2013's Made in America.

Sinclair’s long association with documentaries has resulted in a string of award-winning films, including Martin Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World, which won two Emmy Awards and was nominated for a BAFTA, and No Direction Home: Bob Dylan, for which Sinclair won a Grammy Award, Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who, The Last Play At Shea, 1, and both the Academy Award-winning Undefeated and the Grammy Award-winning Foo Fighters: Back and Forth.

Pascucci, Managing Director of Concord Music Group and former head of Warner’s Rhino Entertainment, was an executive producer on George Harrison, and has recently been associated with Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival: 2013 and Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin’.

This project was originally brought to Apple Corps by One Voice One World, which has conducted extensive research around the globe, including inviting Beatles fans to send in clips of home movies and photos that they acquired during this extraordinary period. OVOW’s Matthew White, Stuart Samuels, and Bruce Higham will form part of the production team as co-producers.

Acclaimed and award winning editor Paul Crowder will serve as editor. Crowder directed and edited the Grammy-nominated Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who, The Last Play at Shea and the Formula One documentary, 1. Crowder’s long-time collaborator, Mark Monroe, will serve as writer. In addition to the aforementioned films, Monroe’s credits include Sound City, Chasing Ice, and the Academy Award-winning, The Cove. Marc Ambrose (Bhutto) will serve as supervising producer.

Nicholas Ferrall will be the executive in charge of production for White Horse Pictures, assisted by executives Jeanne Elfant Festa and Cassidy Hartmann. The Beatles documentary is one of the first projects under Nigel Sinclair’s new White Horse Pictures banner, which he founded in 2014 with long-time business partner Guy East.

Sinclair said, "The way The Beatles burst onto the scene in Britain was an overwhelming social, cultural and musical phenomenon, but was even then eclipsed by that extraordinary explosion on the American scene and then the world. I was lucky enough to see The Beatles perform in Glasgow in 1964, shortly after their Ed Sullivan appearance. It is an honor to work on this project for The Beatles, and to be collaborating again with the extraordinary Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, and my good friend Scott Pascucci."

Source: http://www.thebeatlesliveproject.com/#project_synopsis





Starting to circulate among collectors is a new, free 24 disc set of Beatles material from BBC Radio. The set is designed to accompany Kevin Howlett's book The Beatles: The BBC Archives 1962-1970. Each disc can be stored in a separate case, or they can be placed in slim cases and housed in the box intended for the book. They will fit in the UK box, not in the US one, because that box was a bit smaller.

In the book box
The set includes every known surviving BBC radio music and interview appearance from 1962-1970, plus guest appearances by other acts, and (as bonus items) interviews with those involved in the sessions.

The sessions are arranged chronologically, with several Special Editions including the complete 5th birthdaySaturday Club, The Beatles Abroad, all of the group's appearances on the Top Of The Pops radio series up to 1970, the BBC Beatles Night in December 1963, and even a DVD of their surviving BBC TV appearances.

All tracks have been pulled from the best possible sources including original transcription discs and tapes. Dropouts, mains hum and other annoyances have been carefully removed. Noise reduction has not been used, however it is present on some of the tracks, because noise reduction was used on the releases they are sourced from. Early fades have all been fixed where possible. This has been a huge undertaking, and I am sure the people behind it have spent years of research and audio enhancement work to accomplish such a comprehensive set. These are probably the dedicated and knowledgable fans who should have been trusted to master the Beatles' own official BBC recordings albums... A number of upgrades are included, plus some previously unheard guest appearances. And as a special bonus, a selection of never before heard continuity from the Light Program and Home Service is included, giving a bird's eye view into the hilariously stuffy state of British radio in the early 1960s.

The makers of this amazing collection are not doing it for profit, but because they feel all of The Beatles BBC material should be out there for fans to enjoy and historians to scrutinise. In fact, the set is distributed as free download links, and the people behind it are is are encouraging the fans to continue to distribute this set freely before it gets picked up and distributed for profit by the real bootleggers. They are also encouraging everyone to buy Kevin Howlett's book, not only to get the box to house the collection, but also because it's a vital piece of the BBC puzzle and will enable everyone to put the audio discs into context.  They are also asking people to support the artist and buy the official BBC albums. As they say: This is a fan project, not a bootleg. Don't charge money for copies.

If you have any of the previous releases of the material, like the one from Purple Chick (an earlier non-profit Beatles BBC project), this is a huge update, both regarding upgrades of songs, chat, intros and outtros as well as newly unearthed material. And if you have managed to get hold of the 2010 "Unsurpassed Broadcasts" series, this one surpasses it, both in volume and because it contains material that has been found since then. The set covers the same period that Howlett's book covers, so it goes all the way to 1970, whereas older BBC sets come to a halt after The Beatles' final original music performances in 1965. Doug Sulpy calls this set "core" in his latest issue of The 910, in fact he even hints that it may be too comprehensive! The one thing is, if you want discs, you have to burn them yourself, and the same goes for the artwork, you'll have to print it out.

Volume 1





You won't get this set from my blog, but look around the neighbourhood blogs, and I'm sure you'll stumble over it somewhere.

Source: http://wogew.blogspot.com/2015/01/comprehensive-bbc-set-starts-circulating.html

The Beatles - The BBC Archives 1962-1970 [5 Volumes] (2013) Lossless

Track Listing Details:
Artist: The Beatles
Title Of Album: The BBC Archives 1962-1970
Year Of Release: 2013
Label: 20th Century
Genre: Pop, Rock
Quality: Flac (tracks,cue)
Bitrate: Lossless
Total Time: 5 Vol's
Total Size: 1,34 Gb
WebSitethemortonreport

Tracklist:

Vol.1
1. BBC News March 1962 (2:38)
2. Ray Peters (0:07)
3. Dream Baby (1:48)
4. Ray Peters (0:05)
5. Memphis Tennessee (2:14)
6. Ray Peters (0:09)
7. Please Mr Postman (2:07)
8. Ray Peters (0:06)
9. Ask Me Why (2:17)
10. Ray Peters (0:07)
11. Besame Mucho (2:28)
12. Ray Peters (0:11)
13. A Picture of You (2:18)
14. Interview With Monty Lister (7:23)
15. Chains (1:38)
16. Please Please Me (1:37)
17. Ask Me Why (2:15)
18. Some Other Guy (2:06)
19. Presenter (0:18)
20. Love Me Do (2:16)
21. Keep Your Hands off My Baby (2:29)
22. Beautiful Dreamer (1:53)
23. Ask Me Why (2:21)
24. Ray Peters (0:18)
25. Misery (1:48)
26. Ray Peters (0:12)
27. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:52)
28. Ray Peters (0:22)
29. Please Please Me (1:57)
30. Warmed Over Kisses (Ben Richmond) (2:28)
31. I Saw Her Standing There (2:35)
32. Chat (0:44)
33. Misery (1:49)
34. Too Much Monkey Business (1:50)
35. I'm Talking About You (1:52)
36. Chat (0:52)
37. Please Please Me (1:52)
38. The Hippy Hippy Shake (1:43)
39. Gerry Marsden And Brian Matthew (0:40)
40. From Me To You (1:54)
41. Going Up (1:55)
42. Peter Pilbeam Talks About The Beatles Radio Debut (2:17)
43. Bernie Andrews & Brian Matthew Recall Saturday Club (2:33)
44. Brian Matthew Talks About The Live Saturday Club (0:53)
45. Keep Your Hands Off My Baby (Alternate Source) (2:28)
46. Beautiful Dreamer (Alternate Source) (1:22)
47. Closedown (1:57)

Vol.2
1. Tonight On The Light (0:38)
2. Twist And Shout (2:08)
3. From Me To You (2:22)
4. Chat (1:15)
5. Chat (0:21)
6. Long Tall Sally (1:49)
7. Chat (0:22)
8. A Taste of Honey (2:05)
9. Chains (2:25)
10. Chat (0:22)
11. Thankyou Girl (2:02)
12. Chat (0:12)
13. Boys (1:54)
14. Side By Side (The Beatles And The Karl Denver Trio) (0:51)
15. John Dunn (0:04)
16. Too Much Monkey Business (2:08)
17. Chat (0:15)
18. Boys (2:31)
19. When Day Is Done (The Karl Denver Trio) (2:57)
20. Chat (0:31)
21. I'll Be On My Way (2:07)
22. From Me To You (1:56)
23. Brian Matthew (0:04)
24. I Saw Her Standing There (2:53)
25. Chat (0:25)
26. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:48)
27. Boys (2:32)
28. Chat (0:18)
29. Long Tall Sally (1:45)
30. Chat (0:12)
31. From Me To You (1:52)
32. Money (2:14)
33. Please Please Me (1:59)
34. I Saw Her Standing There (2:58)
35. Lee Peters (0:04)
36. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby (2:02)
37. Chat (0:17)
38. Do You Want To Know A Secret (1:47)
39. Chat (0:22)
40. You Really Got A Hold On Me (2:53)
41. Misery (1:44)
42. Chat (0:19)
43. The Hippy Hippy Shake (1:43)
44. Terry Henebery Talks About Pop Go The Beatles (3:54)
45. George Talks About Terry Henebery (0:35)
46. George Talks About BBC Sessions (1:47)
47. Goodnight (0:20)

Vol.3
1. For The Girl Back Home (0:21)
2. Too Much Monkey Business (1:47)
3. Chat (0:29)
4. I Got To Find My Baby (2:00)
5. Lee Peters (0:22)
6. Youngblood (1:58)
7. Lee Peters (0:10)
8. Till There Was You (2:12)
9. Chat (0:28)
10. Baby It's You (2:48)
11. Who Is Harry (0:23)
12. Lee Peters (0:09)
13. Love Me Do (2:21)
14. Pop Go The Beatles (long vsn) (1:11)
15. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:20)
16. Lee Peters (0:21)
17. A Shot of Rhythm And Blues (2:04)
18. Chat (0:45)
19. Memphis Tennessee (2:17)
20. Chat (0:44)
21. A Taste of Honey (1:54)
22. Lee Peters (0:10)
23. Sure To Fall (2:11)
24. Greenback Dollar (Carter Lewis And The Southerners) (0:58)
25. Lee Peters (0:08)
26. Money (2:45)
27. Chat (0:10)
28. From Me To You (1:51)
29. Some Other Guy (2:01)
30. Chat (0:30)
31. A Taste of Honey (2:00)
32. Thankyou Girl (2:08)
33. Brian Matthew (0:26)
34. From Me To You (1:59)
35. I Saw Her Standing There (2:58)
36. Chat (0:21)
37. Anna (3:00)
38. Chat (0:30)
39. Chat (0:36)
40. Boys (2:28)
41. Chat (0:27)
42. Chains (2:15)
43. Lee Peters (0:07)
44. Faraway Places (The Bachelors) (2:27)
45. Chat (The Bachelors) (0:25)
46. Jailor Bring Some Water (The Bachelors) (2:06)
47. Chat (0:14)
48. Ps I Love You (2:01)
49. Chat (0:40)
50. Twist And Shout (2:24)
51. Lee Peters (0:10)
52. Pop Go The Beatles (long vsn) (1:10)
53. A Taste of Honey (1:53)
54. Twist And Shout (2:27)
55. Keith Bateson Talks About Pop Go The Beatles (1:08)
56. Memphis Tennessee (Incomplete Alt Source) (0:48)
57. The End of The Day (2:07)

Vol.4
1. Music And Fun (0:14)
2. I Got To Find My Baby (1:57)
3. Chat (0:36)
4. Memphis Tennessee (2:19)
5. Money (2:30)
6. Till There Was You (2:13)
7. Chat (0:28)
8. From Me To You (1:52)
9. Roll Over Beethoven (2:29)
10. Pop Go The Beatles (short vsn) (0:18)
11. Rodney Burke (0:13)
12. That's All Right Mama (2:56)
13. Chat (0:53)
14. There's A Place (1:52)
15. Rodney Burke (0:11)
16. I Got A Woman (Graham Bond) (2:39)
17. Cabbage Greens (Graham Bond) (2:31)
18. Rodney Burke (0:11)
19. Carol (2:35)
20. Chat (0:30)
21. Soldiers of Love (2:02)
22. Rodney Burke (0:09)